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Meet Our PEM-Electric Cars. Buy One Today. Make Fuel For It At Home.

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Our Strategic Innovation Team was the first to present, receive media coverage for, receive the U.S. Patent on and win Congressional funding for: The Electric Crash Resistant Low Cost Car.

Our PEM-Electric vehicle used novel foam and sintered pressure membrane structures to solve all of the last remaining problems for the electric vehicle market.

A PEM-Electric Car is just an Electric Car. Elon Musk has notoriously spent over a billion dollars sabotaging PEM-Electric cars because they obsolete his self-exploding, carcinogenically toxic, fetus-damaging, heavy, low-range, lithium ion batteries mined from war-torn nations. PEM-Electric cars are shipping today and they do not have the history of recalls, deaths, fires, crashes, fraud lawsuits, federal charges and labor disputes that Tesla or lithium ion cars have.

Our patent technology has been proven to refuel a PEM-Electric Car in 12 seconds and to extend the range on a Toyota, Honda and Hyundai PEM-Electric Car by hundreds of miles and to eliminate the need for buyers of Toyota, Honda and Hyundai PEM-Electric Car to worry about hunting for limited gas stations . That technology, it's patents, engineering and trade-secrets, backed by millions of dollars of federal funding, is available for sale today!

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) will catch up to electric vehicle (EV) sales because of the advantage of shorter refuel times and greater drive distances, according to a new report.

"Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, with a zero emission capability, represent future of the automobile," said Naqi Jaffery, the lead author of the report published by Information Trends, a Washington-based market research firm.

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The cars are here. They work perfectly. You can buy or lease them. Competing car lines spend billions nay-saying and running disinformation about them but the facts are: They work great and beat everything else!


The report, Global Market for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles, argues that by 2020, sufficient hydrogen filling infrastructure will be in place in several regions of the world, giving a boost to the market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

Worldwide, more than 20 million hydrogen fuel cell vehicles will be sold by 2032, and those sales will generate up to $1.2 trillion in revenue for the auto industry. By 2050, FCVs will be the "fastest growing segment of the auto market," according to Naqi Jaffery, the lead author of the report.

While fast charging and longer distances give FCVs a leg up on EVs, the biggest factor that will drive fuel cell vehicles, Jaffery said, is the commitment of the Japanese government and automakers.

"Both Toyota and Honda, as well as Korea's Hyundai, have largely stayed away from electric vehicles but are embracing fuel cell technology in a big way," Jeffery said in an email reply to Computerworld. "Both are providing funds for establishing hydrogen filling stations."

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Honda's Clarity FCV fuel-cell concept car at the Tokyo Motor Show on Oct. 28, 2015.

Audi has also announced an FCV -- the A7 Sportback h-tron quattro.

Japan will have a network of filling stations by 2020, in time for the Olympic games, Jaffery said. In Europe, Denmark is mostly covered, and both Germany and the U.K. are aggressively building hydrogen filling stations. "Similarly, California is actively involved in setting up filling stations," he added.

Several other major automakers are poised to enter the FCV market, and that will trigger "intense competition." In terms of unit sales, the U.S. will dominate the market compared to other countries, but the region to see the highest growth will be Asia-Pacific, Jaffrey said.

"Several governments are giving generous incentives to help propel the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle market, but Japan is the most bullish on this technology. The Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, envisions hydrogen fuel cell vehicles as part of a 'hydrogen society' where fuel cells will power buildings," the report said.

The report divides the timeline for FCV rollouts into three segments - 2015-2020, 2021-2026, and 2027-2032 - and provides forecasts for each of the three time periods. A companion report, Global Market for Hydrogen Fueling Stations, discusses in detail the infrastructure needed to drive the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle market.

 
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The Toyota Mirai FCV's fuel cell stack, which converts hydrogen and oxygen into electrical power for the engine.

 
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Honda's FCX Clarity fuel cell vehicle, which the company already leases in California.

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How a hydrogen fuel cell stack works.

Steam-methane reformation is most commonly used by oil refineries, which then use the remaining hydrogen to remove impurities such as sulfur from petroleum and diesel fuels.

While acknowledging that hydrogen fuel production today involves the petroleum industry, advances in clean hydrogen fuel production are under way involving water electrolysis technology. Toyota, Honda and other companies already sell devices to make your fuel for these cars at home. Electrolysis uses electricity and a catalyst to create a chemical reaction that separates the hydrogen molecules from oxygen in water. Clean energy sources, such as wind and solar power can be used as an electrical source in combination with water and a catalyst (typically a metal) to generate hydrogen fuel by splitting hydrogen molecules from oxygen. Most often, however, the catalysts are expensive metals, such as platinum (iridium).

We have had an H-Fuel production canister running non-stop making fuel for these cars in our lab for years. It is powered by a solar panel and an AGM battery and it never, ever stops making fuel, night-or-day. We only add water with a special salt compound to it once in awhile. It just sits there and bubbles fuel out of the water and into our storage cassette. Don't believe the lies that the competitors tell you when they say "You can't make it at home!" That is simply not true. YOU CAN! In fact, Honda and Toyota will now sell you a home fuel making system and our associates have a number of them working night and day in Japan at their homes!

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WANT ONE?

THE CARS ARE HERE NOW AND THEY ARE RUNNING GREAT!
JUST CALL YOU CAR DEALER AND SAY: "I WANT TO BUY A PEM FUEL CELL ELECTRIC CAR; WHEN CAN YOU HAVE SOME IN STOCK FOR ME TO TEST DRIVE?". OUR TECHNOLOGY CAN FUEL THEM ANYWHERE YOU ARE:

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Scott Invented the Pressure-Membrane Vehicle Structure

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Scott received the issued federal patent awards for the first pressure-membrane vehicles. His electric car system won Congressional commendation, multi-million dollar federal funding awards from the United States Congress, industry acclaim and a trove of customer letters-of-support.

Modern bumpers and auto dashboards are foam shrouded membranes because that is what is safest and lightest weight in order to achieve the best MPG and safety metrics. Scott’s cars use foam shrouded pressure membranes and NASA-class airbags around the entire vehicle to place the passengers inside the ultimate safety enclosure. Much of the membrane safety structure is hidden within the body of the vehicle in some designs and fully exposed, as a safety surface, in other designs.

Scott has built and delivered a huge number of automobiles and vehicle systems.

The technology he developed has the following advantages:

- The lowest selling-price electric vehicle (magnitudes lower cost than a Tesla or Fisker)
- The first “dent-proof” electric vehicle
- The first crash-resistant and crash dampening vehicle
- The safest vehicle - can withstand a 150 MPH crash & floats in a water emergency
- The best MPG and MPGe vehicle ratings in current markets
- 20X longer range than a Tesla
- The easiest-to-repair vehicle
- The best manufacturing BOM and the easiest to volume manufacture
- All fuel acquired from domestic sources
- 20X less explosive and less toxic fuel than a Tesla or Fisker
- The easiest volume factory build in any UAW facility
- Exceeded the comparative metrics of EVERY competing provider
- Presented the largest volume of customer letters-of-interest-to-purchase to Congress and U.S. DOE ever provided by an applicant
- The most 4WD and flood recovery capability vehicle

Most of the vehicles Scott developed used the following kind of engine (click the link to view video):

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Other vehicles and systems Scott and his Teams developed and built can be seen in this video (click the link to view video):

SCOTT-DOUGLAS-REDMOND-VEHICULAR-TECHNOLOGIES.m4v

 

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Scott was involved in NASA's effort to develop a landing system for Mars and suggested the air bag landing system to the head of the NASA Mars mission. His design was first rejected as "unfeasible" but later accepted as the final design that was actually used to land on Mars because no other system was found to have been capable of delivering the mission.

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Pressure membrane structures are now in use throughout auto development; proving that they work, they save money and they save lives:

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Scott has been awarded a number of federal patents after the U.S. Government examined the record and determined that Scott was the first inventor of the technology:

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The United States Congress has affirmed Scott's technologies:

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Scott received acclaim in Popular Science, Popular Mechanics, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, NPR and hundreds of other publications:

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Scott's vehicle designs received rave reviews from customers:

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SWHWORIG_404.jpgSWHWORIG_405.jpgScott has ground-up built or fully-rebuilt a large number of traditional vehicles and built hundreds of infltable and pressure membrane structures for corporate and government clients:

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Exotic Defense and Tactical Vehicle Prototypes included a flying vehicle and a folding vehicle that could be packed into a duffel bag and air-dropped to rescue teams:

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Here is one of the powerplants installed in Scott's own car and fully functional:

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For Scott's largest government project, he developed a partnership of over 100 car factories and development facilituies across the USA. This resulted in tremendous G&A cost reductions and a dramtic increase in development innovation:

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As of today, no vehicle developer in the world has beat the metrics of the MUV 1!

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Scott's Peer-To-Peer Mesh Network Is Working Today. Buy These Technologies To Expand Your Web...

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mesh network is a local network topology in which the infrastructure nodes (i.e. bridges, switches and other infrastructure devices) connect directly, dynamically and non-hierarchically to as many other nodes as possible and cooperate with one another to efficiently route data from/to clients. Mesh networks dynamically self-organize and self-configure, which can reduce installation overhead. The ability to self-configure enables dynamic distribution of workloads, particularly in the event that a few nodes should fail. This in turn contributes to fault-tolerance and reduced maintenance costs.

Mesh topology may be contrasted with conventional star/tree local network topologies in which the bridges/switches are directly linked to only a small subset of other bridges/switches, and the links between these infrastructure neighbours are hierarchical. While star-and-tree topologies are very well established, highly standardized and vendor-neutral, vendors of mesh network devices have not yet all agreed on common standards, and interoperability between devices from different vendors is not yet assured.

A few of Scott's issued federal patents confirming him as "first-to-invent" in P2P Mesh include:

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Advantages of the technology includes:

- Works anywhere
- No new infrastructure needed
- Can self-power and self-repair
- HD video has now been used across the system
- Saves billions of dollars in infrastructure costs
- Provides instant communications in a disaster zone
- Can operate with, or without, cell towers
- Very low cost

 

A few ways for you to try out the technology include:

http://www.beartooth.com

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http://www.tp-link.com/us/home-networking/deco/

https://eero.com/shop/home-wifi-system

http://www.open-mesh.com/products/access-points.html

https://www.ubnt.com/unifi/unifi-ap/

https://www.opengarden.com/firechat

https://www.engeniustech.com/engenius-products/enmesh-whole-home-wi-fi-system/

https://www.linksys.com/us/velop

https://www.zyxel.com/us/en/products_services/AC3000-Tri-Band-WiFi-System-Multy-X/

http://p2psipphone.sourceforge.net/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer-to-peer_SIP

https://puri.sm/shop/librem-5/

https://www.amazon.com/kisslink-NB7532MESH-Replacement-Coverage-Gigabit/dp/B07419N7FZ

One group is tossing solar powered Raspberry Pi mounted versions of these in bushes and on trees around San Francisco in order to grow a free mesh internet:

http://ayrstone.com/www/product/hub2n/

https://www.amazon.com/UCTRONICS-Internet-ESP8266-Development-Compatible/dp/B01N0QONLM/ref=sr_1_101?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1509376597&sr=1-101&keywords=mesh+network

https://meraki.cisco.com/lib/pdf/meraki_datasheet_MR72.pdf

http://www.tml.tkk.fi/Publications/C/18/raivio.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer-to-peer

http://p2p-internet.weebly.com

 

....and thousands more...

 

 

 

 

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The walk-in Reality Chamber, Also Known As "The Holodeck" on Star Trek and The SGI "CAVE" - invented by Scott

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You have seen Scott's invention on Star Trek, In Spectrum Holobyte's Star Trek Experience in Las Vegas, at SGI's and the University of Illinois CAVE and in many venues around the globe. Multiple seminal patents for this technology were issued to Scott by the U.S. Government after extensive federal research proved that he was the first-to-invent and build the technology.

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Scott's invention was acknowledged by The White House multiple times:

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Scott's system has been deployed, demonstrated, operated and delivered for clients and military operations around the world.

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AS SEEN IN STAR TREK'S VISUALIZATION OF THE TECHNOLOGY WHICH IS CALLED "THE HOLODECK" ON THE TV SERIES:

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SCOTT'S INVENTION WAS FEATURED IN OLIVER STONE'S PRODUCTION OF "WILD PALMS". IN THE FOLLOWING E! ENTERTAINMENT NETWORK BROADCAST, SCOTT DESCRIBES CONSULTING FOR OLIVER STONE'S PRODUCTION COMPANY:

CLICK THIS LINK TO WATCH THE TV SEGMENT:
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THE TECHNOLOGY IS NOW IN USE IN OVER 40 DEFENSE MISSION SIMULATORS AND TACTICAL TRAINING CENTERS AROUND THE GLOBE.

Read A few of Scott's issued patents, by the U.S. Government, for these inventions:

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The First “iPhone” and “SmartPhone”

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Scott Douglas Redmond built, showed, marketed, filed multiple patents on and received multiple U.S. Federal patent issuances for the device now known as “The iPhone” and the “Smartphone” prior to Apple or Sony announcing or showing a Clie or iPhone device.

Scott was the first to demonstrate, for Apple, products that Apple later released as “The iPhone”, “Quicktime VR”, the use of an iPhone as a virtual reality display, position sensing device and camera-to-computer augmented reality and a shape-shifting mobile phone surface.

No known records have been provided by Apple, per questions from the news media, that show any proof, by Apple, of work on the product until years after Scott first invented and patented the product.

In this patent, one of several, notice the date, which was many years before Apple first gave order’s to it’s internal development team to begin design on their iPhone:

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Previous patent filings, signed NDA’s, contracts, emails and industry records show even earlier invention proof dates.

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Per Wikipedia:

 

iPhone (/ˈaɪfoʊn/ EYE-fohn) is a line of smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. They run Apple's iOS mobile operating system. The first generation iPhone was released on June 29, 2007, and there have been multiple new hardware iterations with new iOS releases since.

The user interface is built around the device's multi-touch screen, including a virtual keyboard. The iPhone has Wi-Fi and can connect to cellular networks. An iPhone can shoot video (though this was not a standard feature until the iPhone 3GS), take photos, play music, send and receive email, browse the web, send and receive text messages, follow GPS navigation, record notes, perform mathematical calculations, and receive visual voicemail. Other functionality, such as video games, reference works, and social networking, can be enabled by downloading mobile apps. As of January 2017, Apple's App Store contained more than 2.2 million applications available for the iPhone.

Apple has released eleven generations of iPhone models, each accompanied by one of the eleven major releases of the iOS operating system. The original 1st-generation iPhone was a GSM phone and established design precedents, such as a button placement that has persisted throughout all releases and a screen size maintained for the next four iterations. The iPhone 3G added 3G network support, and was followed by the 3GS with improved hardware, the 4 with a metal chassis, higher display resolution and front-facing camera, and the 4S with improved hardware and the voice assistant Siri. The iPhone 5 featured a taller, 4-inch display and Apple's newly introduced Lightning connector. In 2013, Apple released the 5S with improved hardware and a fingerprint reader, and the lower-cost 5C, a version of the 5 with colored plastic casings instead of metal. They were followed by the larger iPhone 6, with models featuring 4.7 and 5.5-inch displays. The iPhone 6S was introduced the following year, which featured hardware upgrades and support for pressure-sensitive touch inputs, as well as the SE—which featured hardware from the 6S but the smaller form factor of the 5S. In 2016, Apple unveiled the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, which add water resistance, improved system and graphics performance, a new rear dual-camera setup on the Plus model, and new color options, while removing the 3.5 mm headphone jack found on previous models. The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus were released in 2017, adding a glass back and an improved screen and camera. The iPhone X was released alongside the 8 and 8 Plus, with its highlights being a near bezel-less design, an improved camera and a new facial recognition system, named Face ID, but having no home button, and therefore, no Touch ID.

The original iPhone was described as "revolutionary" and a "game-changer" for the mobile phone industry. Newer iterations have also garnered praise, and the iPhone's success has been credited with helping to make Apple one of the world's most valuable publicly traded companies.

Apple has filed more than 200 patent applications related to the technology behind the iPhone.[265][266]

LG Electronics claimed the design of the iPhone was copied from the LG Prada. Woo-Young Kwak, head of LG Mobile Handset R&D Center, said at a press conference: "we consider that Apple copied Prada phone after the design was unveiled when it was presented in the iF Design Award and won the prize in September 2006."[267]

On September 3, 1993, Infogear filed for the US trademark "I PHONE"[268] and on March 20, 1996, applied for the trademark "IPhone".[269] "I Phone" was registered in March 1998,[268] and "IPhone" was registered in 1999.[269] Since then, the I PHONE mark had been abandoned.[268] Infogear trademarks cover "communications terminals comprising computer hardware and software providing integrated telephone, data communications and personal computer functions" (1993 filing),[268] and "computer hardware and software for providing integrated telephone communication with computerized global information networks" (1996 filing).[270]

Infogear released a telephone with an integrated web browser under the name iPhone in 1998.[271] In 2000, Infogear won an infringement claim against the owners of the iphones.com domain name.[272] In June 2000, Cisco Systems acquired Infogear, including the iPhone trademark.[273] On December 18, 2006, they released a range of re-branded Voice over IP (VoIP) sets under the name iPhone.[274]

In October 2002, Apple applied for the "iPhone" trademark in the United Kingdom, Australia, Singapore, and the European Union. A Canadian application followed in October 2004, and a New Zealand application in September 2006. As of October 2006, only the Singapore and Australian applications had been granted.

In September 2006, a company called Ocean Telecom Services applied for an "iPhone" trademark in the United States, United Kingdom and Hong Kong, following a filing in Trinidad and Tobago.[275] As the Ocean Telecom trademark applications use exactly the same wording as the New Zealand application of Apple, it is assumed that Ocean Telecom is applying on behalf of Apple.[276] The Canadian application was opposed in August 2005, by a Canadian company called Comwave who themselves applied for the trademark three months later. Comwave has been selling VoIP devices called iPhone since 2004.[273]

Shortly after Steve Jobs' January 9, 2007 announcement that Apple would be selling a product called iPhone in June 2007, Cisco issued a statement that it had been negotiating trademark licensing with Apple and expected Apple to agree to the final documents that had been submitted the night before.[277] On January 10, 2007, Cisco announced it had filed a lawsuit against Apple over the infringement of the trademark iPhone, seeking an injunction in federal court to prohibit Apple from using the name.[278] In February 2007, Cisco claimed that the trademark lawsuit was a "minor skirmish" that was not about money, but about interoperability.[279]

On February 2, 2007, Apple and Cisco announced that they had agreed to temporarily suspend litigation while they held settlement talks,[280] and subsequently announced on February 20, 2007, that they had reached an agreement. Both companies will be allowed to use the "iPhone" name[281] in exchange for "exploring interoperability" between their security, consumer, and business communications products.[282]

The iPhone has also inspired several leading high-tech clones,[283] driving both the popularity of Apple and consumer willingness to upgrade iPhones quickly.[284]

On October 22, 2009, Nokia filed a lawsuit against Apple for infringement of its GSM, UMTS and WLAN patents. Nokia alleges that Apple has been violating ten Nokia patents since the iPhone initial release.[285]

In December 2010, Reuters reported that some iPhone and iPad users were suing Apple Inc. because some applications were passing user information to third-party advertisers without permission. Some makers of the applications such as Textplus4, Paper Toss, The Weather Channel, Dictionary.com, Talking Tom Cat and Pumpkin Maker have also been named as co-defendants in the lawsuit.[286]

In August 2012, Apple won a smartphone patent lawsuit in the U.S. against Samsung, the world's largest maker of smartphones;[287] however, on December 6, 2016, SCOTUS reversed the decision that awarded nearly $400 million to Apple and returned the case to Federal Circuit court to define the appropriate legal standard to define "article of manufacture" because it is not the smartphone itself but could be just the case and screen to which the design patents relate.[288]

Development of what was to become the iPhone began in 2004, when Apple started to gather a team of 1,000 employees to work on the highly confidential "Project Purple",[15] including Jonathan Ive, the designer behind the iMac and iPod.[16] Apple CEO Steve Jobs steered the original focus away from a tablet (which Apple eventually revisited in the form of the iPad) and towards a phone.[17] Apple created the device during a secretive collaboration with Cingular Wireless (now AT&T Mobility) at the time—at an estimated development cost of US$150 million over thirty months.[18]

Apple rejected the "design by committee" approach that had yielded the Motorola ROKR E1, a largely unsuccessful collaboration with Motorola. Among other deficiencies, the ROKR E1's firmware limited storage to only 100 iTunes songs to avoid competing with Apple's iPod nano.[19][20]

Cingular gave Apple the liberty to develop the iPhone's hardware and software in-house[21][22] and even paid Apple a fraction of its monthly service revenue (until the iPhone 3G),[23] in exchange for four years of exclusive US sales, until 2011.[24]

Jobs unveiled the iPhone to the public on January 9, 2007, at the Macworld 2007 convention at the Moscone Center in San Francisco.[25] The two initial models, a 4 GB model priced at US$499 and an 8 GB model at US$599 (both requiring a 2-year contract), went on sale in the United States on June 29, 2007, at 6:00 pm local time, while hundreds of customers lined up outside the stores nationwide.[26] The passionate reaction to the launch of the iPhone resulted in sections of the media dubbing it the 'Jesus phone'.[27][28] Following this successful release in the US, the first generation iPhone was made available in the UK, France, and Germany in November 2007, and Ireland and Austria in the spring of 2008.

 

On July 11, 2008, Apple released the iPhone 3G in twenty-two countries, including the original six.[29] Apple released the iPhone 3G in upwards of eighty countries and territories.[30] Apple announced the iPhone 3GS on June 8, 2009, along with plans to release it later in June, July, and August, starting with the US, Canada and major European countries on June 19. Many would-be users objected to the iPhone's cost,[31] and 40% of users had household incomes over US$100,000.[32]

The back of the original first generation iPhone was made of aluminum with a black plastic accent. The iPhone 3G and 3GS feature a full plastic back to increase the strength of the GSM signal.[33] The iPhone 3G was available in an 8 GB black model, or a black or white option for the 16 GB model. The iPhone 3GS was available in both colors, regardless of storage capacity.

The iPhone 4 has an aluminosilicate glass front and back with a stainless steel edge that serves as the antennas. It was at first available in black; the white version was announced, but not released until April 2011, 10 months later.

Users of the iPhone 4 reported dropped/disconnected telephone calls when holding their phones in a certain way. This became known as antennagate.[34]

On January 11, 2011, Verizon announced during a media event that it had reached an agreement with Apple and would begin selling a CDMA iPhone 4. Verizon said it would be available for pre-order on February 3, with a release set for February 10.[35][36] In February 2011, the Verizon iPhone accounted for 4.5% of all iPhone ad impressions in the US on Millennial Media's mobile ad network.[37]

From 2007 to 2011, Apple spent $647 million on advertising for the iPhone in the US.[15]

On Tuesday, September 27, Apple sent invitations for a press event to be held October 4, 2011, at 10:00 am at the Cupertino Headquarters to announce details of the next generation iPhone, which turned out to be iPhone 4S. Over 1 million 4S models were sold in the first 24 hours after its release in October 2011.[38] Due to large volumes of the iPhone being manufactured and its high selling price, Apple became the largest mobile handset vendor in the world by revenue, in 2011, surpassing long-time leader Nokia.[39] American carrier C Spire Wireless announced that it would be carrying the iPhone 4S on October 19, 2011.[40]

In January 2012, Apple reported its best quarterly earnings ever, with 53% of its revenue coming from the sale of 37 million iPhones, at an average selling price of nearly $660. The average selling price has remained fairly constant for most of the phone's lifespan, hovering between $622 and $660.[41] The production price of the iPhone 4S was estimated by IHS iSuppli, in October 2011, to be $188, $207 and $245, for the 16 GB, 32 GB and 64 GB models, respectively.[42] Labor costs are estimated at between $12.50 and $30 per unit, with workers on the iPhone assembly line making $1.78 an hour.[43]

In February 2012, ComScore reported that 12.4% of US mobile subscribers used an iPhone.[44] Approximately 6.4 million iPhones are active in the US alone.[32]

On September 12, 2012, Apple announced the iPhone 5. It has a 4-inch display, up from its predecessors' 3.5-inch screen. The device comes with the same 326 pixels per inch found in the iPhone 4 and 4S. The iPhone 5 has the SoC A6 processor, the chip is 22% smaller than the iPhone 4S' A5 and is twice as fast, doubling the graphics performance of its predecessor. The device is 18% thinner than the iPhone 4S, measuring 7.6 millimetres (0.3 in), and is 20% lighter at 112 grams (4 oz).

On July 6, 2013, it was reported that Apple was in talks with Korean mobile carrier SK Telecom to release the next generation iPhone with LTE Advanced technology.[45]

On July 22, 2013, the company's suppliers said that Apple is testing out larger screens for the iPhone and iPad. "Apple has asked for prototype smartphone screens larger than 4 inches and has also asked for screen designs for a new tablet device measuring slightly less than 13 inches diagonally, they said."[46]

On September 10, 2013, Apple unveiled two new iPhone models during a highly anticipated press event in Cupertino. The iPhone 5C, a mid-range-priced version of the handset that is designed to increase accessibility due to its price is available in five colors (green, blue, yellow, pink, and white) and is made of plastic. The iPhone 5S comes in three colors (black, white, and gold) and the home button is replaced with a fingerprint scanner (Touch ID). Both phones shipped on September 20, 2013.[47]

On September 9, 2014, Apple revealed the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus at an event in Cupertino. Both devices had a larger screen than their predecessor, at 4.7 and 5.5 inches respectively.[48]

In 2016, Apple unveiled the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, which add water and dust resistance, improved system and graphics performance, a new dual-camera setup on the Plus model, new color options, and remove the 3.5 mm headphone jack.[49]

On September 12, 2017, Apple officially unveiled the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, which features a new glass design, camera improvements, a True Tone display, wireless charging and improved system performance. It also unveiled the iPhone X, which features a near-bezelless design, face recognition dubbed "Face ID" with facial tracking used for Animojis, an OLED screen with the highest pixel density on an iPhone, a new telephoto lens which works better in low light conditions, and improved cameras for AR.[50]

Sales and profits

Apple sold 6.1 million first generation iPhone units over five quarters.[51] Sales in the fourth quarter of 2008, temporarily surpassed those of Research In Motion's (RIM) BlackBerry sales of 5.2 million units, which briefly made Apple the third largest mobile phone manufacturer by revenue, after Nokia and Samsung[52] (However, some of this income is deferred[53]). Recorded sales grew steadily thereafter, and by the end of fiscal year 2010, a total of 73.5 million iPhones were sold.[54]

By 2010, the iPhone had a market share of barely 4% of all cellphones; however, Apple pulled in more than 50% of the total profit that global cellphone sales generate.[55] Apple sold 14.1 million iPhones in the third quarter of 2010, representing a 91% unit growth over the year-ago quarter, which was well ahead of IDC's latest published estimate of 64% growth for the global smartphone market in the September quarter. Apple's sales surpassed that of Research in Motion's 12.1 million BlackBerry units sold in their most recent quarter ended August 2010.[56] In the United States market alone for the third quarter of 2010, while there were 9.1 million Android-powered smartphones shipped for 43.6% of the market, Apple iOS was the number two phone operating system with 26.2% but the 5.5 million iPhones sold made it the most popular single device.[57]

On March 2, 2011, at the iPad 2 launch event, Apple announced that they had sold 100 million iPhones worldwide.[58] As a result of the success of the iPhone sales volume and high selling price, headlined by the iPhone 4S, Apple became the largest mobile handset vendor in the world by revenue in 2011, surpassing long-time leader Nokia.[39] While the Samsung Galaxy S II proved more popular than the iPhone 4S in parts of Europe, the iPhone 4S was dominant in the United States.[59]

In January 2012, Apple reported its best quarterly earnings ever, with 53% of its revenue coming from the sale of 37 million iPhones, at an average selling price of nearly $660. The average selling price has remained fairly constant for most of the phone's lifespan, hovering between $622 and $660.[41]

For the eight largest phone manufacturers in Q1 2012, according to Horace Dediu at Asymco, Apple and Samsung combined to take 99% of industry profits (HTC took the remaining 1%, while RIM, LG, Sony Ericsson, Motorola, and Nokia all suffered losses), with Apple earning 73 cents out of every dollar earned by the phone makers. As the industry profits grew from $5.3 billion in the first quarter of 2010 to $14.4 billion in the first quarter of 2012 (quadruple the profits in 2007),[60][61] Apple had managed to increase its share of these profits. This is due to increasing carrier subsidies and the high selling prices of the iPhone, which had a negative effect on the wireless carriers (AT&T Mobility, Verizon, and Sprint) who have seen their EBITDA service margins drop as they sold an increasing number of iPhones.[62][63][64] By the quarter ended March 31, 2012, Apple's sales from the iPhone alone (at $22.7 billion) exceeded the total of Microsoft from all of its businesses ($17.4 billion).[65]

In the fourth quarter of 2012, the iPhone 5 and iPhone 4S were the best-selling handsets with sales of 27.4 million (13% of smartphones worldwide) and 17.4 million units, respectively, with the Samsung Galaxy S III in third with 15.4 million. According to Strategy Analytics' data, this was "an impressive performance, given the iPhone portfolio’s premium pricing," adding that the Galaxy S III’s global popularity "appears to have peaked" (the Galaxy S III was touted as an iPhone-killer by some in the press when it was released[66][67]). While Samsung has led in worldwide sales of smartphones, Apple's iPhone line has still managed to top Samsung's smartphone offerings in the United States,[68] with 21.4% share and 37.8% in that market, respectively. iOS grew 3.5% to a 37.8%, while Android slid 1.3% to fall to a 52.3% share.[69]

The continued top popularity of the iPhone despite growing Android competition was also attributed to Apple being able to deliver iOS updates over the air, while Android updates are frequently impeded by carrier testing requirements and hardware tailoring, forcing consumers to purchase a new Android smartphone to get the latest version of that OS.[70] However, by 2013, Apple's market share had fallen to 13.1%, due to the surging popularity of the Android offerings.[71]

Apple announced on September 1, 2013, that its iPhone trade-in program would be implemented at all of its 250 specialty stores in the US. For the program to become available, customers must have a valid contract and must purchase a new phone, rather than simply receive credit to be used at a later date. A significant part of the program's goal is to increase the number of customers who purchase iPhones at Apple stores rather than carrier stores.[72]

On September 20, 2013, the sales date of the iPhone 5S and 5C models, the longest ever queue was observed at the New York City flagship Apple store, in addition to prominent queues in San Francisco, US and Canada; however, locations throughout the world were identified for the anticipation of corresponding consumers.[73] Apple also increased production of the gold-colored iPhone 5S by an additional one-third due to the particularly strong demand that emerged.[74] Apple had decided to introduce a gold model after finding that gold was seen as a popular sign of a luxury product among Chinese customers.[75]

Apple released its opening weekend sales results for the 5C and 5S models, showing an all-time high for the product's sales figures, with 9 million handsets sold—the previous record was set in 2012, when 5 million handsets were sold during the opening weekend of the 5 model. This was the first time that Apple has simultaneously launched two models and the inclusion of China in the list of markets contributed to the record sales result.[76] Apple also announced that, as of September 23, 2013, 200 million devices were running the iOS 7 update, making it the "fastest software upgrade in history."[77]

An Apple Store located at the Christiana Mall in Newark, Delaware, US claimed the highest iPhones sales figures in November 2013. The store's high sales results are due to the absence of a sales tax in the state of Delaware.[78]

The finalization of a deal between Apple and China Mobile, the world's largest mobile network, was announced in late December 2013. The multi-year agreement provides iPhone access to over 760 million China Mobile subscribers.[79]

In the first quarter of 2014, Apple reported that it had sold 51 million iPhones, an all-time quarterly record, compared to 47.8 million in the year-ago quarter.[80][81]

The Sony CLIÉ is a series of personal digital assistants running the Palm Operating System developed and marketed by Sony from 2000 to 2005. The devices introduced many new features to the PDA market, such as a jog-wheel interface, high-resolution displays, and Sony technologies like Memory Stick slots and ATRAC3 audio playback. Most models were designed and manufactured in Japan. The name is an acronym for creativity, lifestyle, innovation, emotion though formerly communication, link, information and entertainment. It was initially an attempt at a new coinage term, though it means "tool" in the Jèrriais language.

The CLIÉ handhelds were distinguished from other Palm OS models by their emphasis on multimedia capabilities, including photo, video, and audio playback, long before any other Palm OS PDAs had such capabilities. Later models have been credited with spurring competition in the previously stagnant Palm market, closing many of the gaps that existed between Palm OS PDAs and those powered by Microsoft's Windows Mobile operating system, particularly on the multimedia front, but also with Sony's proprietary application launcher interface.

Email to Scott from Sony’s head of mobile devices after Sony consulted with Scott. In this email the Sony boss says that Sony is not going to make a Clie...then they do make it:

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Scott’s team is the only non-Sony party mentioned (...and mention over-and-over) in Sony’s federal patent filings as the source of Sony’s technology:

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During the heyday of the iPhones, total profits for Apple for the iPhone are said, by Forbes, to be in the many billions of dollars.

 

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Litigation Funding Brings Balance to the David Against Goliath World of the Silicon Valley Tech Oligarchs

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What are the advantages of litigation funding?:

See: https://www.slideshare.net/Litigation-Fuding/the-advantages-of-third-party-funding-litigation

Also take a look at this article:

Evolving trends in litigation funding

 | LEGAL & REGULATORY  |  LITIGATION & DISPUTE RESOLUTION

Financier Worldwide Magazine


Third party litigation funding continues to grow and evolve. The basic business model – funding of all legal and other ancillary costs related to a claim in exchange for a share of the damages if the claim is successfully resolved – has withstood the test of time and is highly attractive for both claimants requiring funding as well as investors looking for above-average returns. There follows an overview of the major current trends that underpin the growth of this fast-moving and still relatively young industry.

Increase in volume of claims requiring funding

The industry has experienced a steady increase in the number of claims requiring third party funding. This increase can be attributed to a combination of factors such as the recognition that funding of claims ‘works’ and benefits all those involved (claimants, funders, professional advisers), an established track record of successfully funded claims by institutional funders and better promotion of the industry through marketing efforts by recognised players who are members of the Association of Litigation Funders of England and Wales.

Another explanation for the increase in the number of claims being presented for funding resides in the cost reforms introduced in England and Wales as of April 2013, also referred to as the ‘Jackson Reforms’. These reforms have altered the landscape of claimants litigating with the benefit of Conditional Fee Agreements (CFAs) and After the Event insurance (ATE).

Under a CFA, a solicitor or barrister in England and Wales will work for the claimant client with no payment during the course of the case and on the basis that he will receive nothing at all if the case is lost. The benefit for the lawyer is that he is rewarded for taking the risk of getting nothing by receiving a success fee if the case is won, which can amount to a maximum of 100 percent uplift on his normal hourly charges. Prior to April 2013, the cost of the success fee could be passed on to the defendant if the case was won.

Under the new regime, claimants can no longer recover success fees from defendants but all claimants’ lawyers are permitted to work on a ‘contingency fee’ basis and thus agree with their clients to structure fees as a proportion of damages awarded. These arrangements, also known as ‘damages based agreements’ or ‘DBAs’, were supposed to facilitate the funding of claims for the claimants by their lawyers. What we are finding is that, due to a total lack of clarity in the regulations governing them, lawyers are unwilling to enter into DBAs as they could win a case and then be deprived of their remuneration as a result of non-compliance with incomprehensible regulations. Lawyers prefer to continue to invoice their clients on an ongoing basis and are increasingly recommending third party funding as the ‘go to’ solution to clients instead of entering into CFAs or DBAs.

The new costs regime has also impacted claimants who chose to take up ATE cover and who are now looking to third party funders to cover the cost of such cover.

An ATE policy is a policy of insurance under which a party to litigation insures against the risk of losing his case and having to pay the opponent’s costs. As was the case with CFAs, prior to the Jackson Reforms a claimant could litigate with the benefit of an ATE policy and, if he won the action, pass the cost onto the losing defendant who had to pay the premium on the claimant’s insurance policy, which the claimant chose to take without consulting him. Since April 2013, claimants other than insolvency practitioners who take out an ATE policy must pay the premium out of their own pocket. The whole premium now comes out of the successful claimant’s damages. As of April 2015, insolvency practitioners will lose their special exemption and also have to absorb their ATE premiums. As some funders are prepared to offer claimants an indemnity to cover the defendant’s costs in case the claim is lost, claimants increasingly see the benefit of third party funding to secure such an indemnity as part of the funding package.

We are also noticing an increase in the volume of claims being presented for funding by insolvency practitioners. Third party funding is well known to them. Liquidators are very often in the position of ‘David’ having to face the ‘Goliath’ claimant whose only hope is that David will not be able to find the money to sue him. If the defendant happens to be a former director of the now insolvent company on whose behalf the liquidator is pursuing the claim, he most probably made sure before the liquidation that the company was thoroughly stripped of all cash and assets to leave the liquidator with little or no money to pursue any claim against him. Third party funding then becomes ‘the only game in town’ for any insolvency practitioner who lacks the funds to pursue the claim.

Higher quality of claims presented for funding

Third party funders have become accustomed to ‘bad claims’ being presented for funding. ‘Bad claims’ come in various forms and guises. First, there are always straightforward unmeritorious claims, often presented for funding directly by the claimant without any supporting documentation. Then, there are cases proposed for funding just before trial or when their limitation period is on the point of expiring. Again, these are usually presented by claimants themselves, either because they have run out of money to pay the lawyers or because they have tried to conduct the case on their own without legal representation. There are also cases that could have been fundable but have been destroyed by the claimants doing them ‘on the cheap’ until they realise that they have ruined their chances of success. They then turn to a funder in desperation, in the hope that the funder will finance a decent legal team to rescue the case. In those circumstances, funders can be forgiven for feeling that they are treated more as maritime salvage companies rather than investors. Finally, there are the cases that are supported by opinions from the legal team who have fallen in love with the case and become unable to spot obvious weaknesses.

Reviewing and rejecting bad claims is part and parcel of a funder’s job. What is reassuring and is evidenced by our more recent experience is that claims of a much higher quality are now being presented for funding.

‘Good claims’ in our industry means claims where the professional funder can clearly understand and evaluate duty, breach, causation and the damage suffered by the claimant. These are claims which are conducted by able legal teams who provide the funders with detailed legal analysis supported by a suitable bundle of relevant copy documentation, a realistic estimate of the quantum of the claim and a well-considered budget. These are what funders want and expect to see in order to offer terms.

New challenges and opportunities

The increased awareness of the availability of third party litigation funding creates both challenges and opportunities. We briefly focus on several opportunities available to the industry and on the main challenge flowing from these opportunities.

Claimants are aware that litigation funding is available and gives them the opportunity of avoiding the damage to their cash flow caused by having to pay monthly lawyers’ bills. Lawyers have accepted that they have to respond to that awareness and demand for alternative funding on the part of their clients by assisting them to approach third party funders. This is precisely the expansion of access to justice which the Jackson Reforms were intended to achieve. As a result, the volume of claims referred for funding is increasing rapidly and we expect this trend to continue.

Litigation funding is now an accepted, viable and alternative asset class for investors who wish to diversify their portfolio. The fundamentals of this asset class are compelling: reputable and institutional funders have an established and proven track record of above average returns, demand far outstrips supply and the asset class is not linked to economic cycles. Based on these highly attractive fundamentals, the industry has managed to attract hundreds of millions of dollars from investors, be they quoted funds on the London Stock Exchange, hedge funds, family offices or private individuals. We expect this trend to continue and believe that more money will become available for case funding over time.

With these opportunities comes an important challenge: namely, how to satisfy the demands of claimants and investors alike, while at the same time maintaining the high level of caution and professionalism required to ensure the industry’s continued growth and success.

As investors are attracted by the high returns offered by this asset class, they are prepared to invest more money but will insist on commensurate returns. The seduction of a much larger funding capacity and that of a potentially much higher personal compensation (often in the form of a management fee and a carry) can lead some funders to invest in claims that do not meet stringent due diligence requirements simply in order to deploy available capital. When a funded claim fails because a judge rules it spurious, everybody gets hurt: claimants, investors and the industry as a whole, because it is still too young to afford bad publicity.

It is the responsibility of each professional and reputable funder to ensure that it avoids the temptation of taking on excessively risky cases simply to deploy investors’ capital. The funders who belong to the Association of Litigation Funders of England and Wales have acquired a justified reputation for professionalism and probity and it is to be expected that they will hold fast to those standards in order to ensure their own and the industry’s continued success.

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Top performing litigation financier Bentham, provides these recommendations:

The Benefits of Using Litigation Funding Over Litigation Insurance

The Benefits of Using Litigation Funding Over Litigation Insurance
By: Allison Chock, Chief Investment Officer US

Litigation funding and litigation insurance are sometimes compared as ways to help litigants reduce their risk when bringing contingency fee-based claims. At first glance, funding and insurance may appear to be similar, however, they are distinct tools with substantially different methods and benefits. Litigation funding occurs when a third party provides non-recourse financing for all or a part of a claimant’s litigation costs while the case is pending in exchange for an agreed-upon share of the recovery. Litigation insurance also covers legal expenses, however, potential payment from the insurance company occurs once a matter has concluded.

While litigation funding and litigation insurance can be used by claimants with any socio-economic background, insurance tends to attract deep-pocketed claimants who can afford to fund expenses through a lengthy litigation process whereas funding appeals to claimants from both sides of the tracks. According to a recent report by The American Lawyer, a standard litigation insurance policy can cover litigation costs between 40 to 70% of attorney fees. Litigation insurance generally works “after the event.” The insurer covers the costs in the event of a loss. Policies also allow the insured to pay premiums when the case is successfully completed.  

Funding, on the other hand, covers costs as they are incurred, maximizes the value of claims, and, for corporate litigants, can improve the bottom line. Here are a few key points on how litigation funding differs from litigation insurance:

• Investment. The fundamental difference between litigation funding and litigation insurance is that funding provides up-front capital to help cover the costs of pursuing a claim. For law firms and companies, the cost of litigation can be prohibitive. Even when there are meritorious claims that could produce substantial returns, claimants are sometimes forced to settle for pennies on the dollar or abandon cases entirely because of the associated legal expense of continuing to a trial. Litigation funding solves this problem by financing cases and generating a return on its investment only if, and when, the matter is successfully resolved.

• Higher Stakes. To ensure that the claimant receives the lion’s share of a successful resolution, Bentham IMF funds only meritorious, high-stakes cases that are likely to generate substantial settlements or judgments and are supported by a strong legal team. While insurers sometimes offer policies on smaller cases, to be eligible for Bentham’s funding, litigants must request more than $1 million. In addition, the anticipated settlement or judgment must exceed $10 million (exclusive of punitive damages), the defendant must have a clear ability to pay, and the litigation must have strong prospects of success. Bentham also has the flexibility to fund a portfolio of cases, giving litigants the ability to finance a number of cases while spreading their potential risk across multiple claims.

Maximizing Value. With funding, litigants have unique opportunities to evaluate the viability of their claims and to maximize their potential value. Bentham does extensive due diligence into cases that it may fund, and in so doing, provides valuable insight for claimants about the strengths and weaknesses of their claims. If a case is funded, the money can be used to help hire the best possible counsel to effectively combat delay tactics by a well-funded opponent, and to allow the claimant to withstand low-ball settlement offers.

• Accounting Benefits. Litigation (including any associated insurance premiums) appears as an expense—a costly one—on corporate books, and a large piece of ongoing litigation can have a significant, negative impact on a profit and loss statement. On the other hand, litigation cannot be recognized as a potential asset, even in situations where the company may have a strong likelihood of a substantial recovery. The unfavorable accounting rules and the resulting drag on profits can sour companies on the prospect of pursuing litigation, even when it is meritorious and potentially lucrative. When funding is used to finance litigation, however, legal spending is removed from the books. The company’s bottom line brightens and executives may be more likely to pursue legal claims.

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HOW IT WORKS

We own the exclusive rights for certain high-ticket litigation opportunities

- Litigation funding is litigation finance

- In this option we deploy transactions where the asset value of our litigation claims is used to secure financing from outside investors

- Third-party investors provide funds for our cases on a non-recourse basis. This means that the return of capital is tied to a successful outcome in the litigation via settlement or court award

Litigation finance can be used by one company to sue another, so that the general counsel’s office can become a revenue generator instead of a cost center...” — Above the Law

Commercial litigation funding partnerships solve the following industry problems:

- Mitigating the existing costs of an existing ultra-expensive legal system

- Management problems with the hourly billing model

- Budget uncertainty for investment concerns. Back-up must be provided when the budget runs out

- Legal fee expenses on a corporate balance sheet are problematic

- Litigation for the smaller entity must become less risky

- The market demands a need for risk mitigation and risk/upside sharing

In a typical opportunity the court cost will be $2 to $7M or 2.5 to 4 years for an affirmative and elective litigation with targeted rewards of 4 to 7+ times the $2M to $7M investment.

This opportunity facilitates recovery of lost revenue and provides access to capital for meritorious claims. It provides risk-sharing and reduces budget uncertainty while delivering the resources to retain top tier counsel. In this process company and counsel interests are aligned while changing off-balance sheet legal items into profit centers.

The ways that Funders can invest in our litigation opportunities:

- Directly paying full hourly fees to approved law firms

- Risk Sharing

- Direct legal costs funding

- Working capital accounts and credit cards

- Appeals risk reduction support

- Risk Sharing with lawyers

Option #1 Risk Sharing: 50/50 (Full Contingency)

Invest 50% to 75% of Hourly Fees + discount and recover 20% to 35% of proceeds

Law firm invests discount on hourly fees and gets paid 50% to 75% of normal fee rate plus 10% to 15% success bonus from our cases

Option # 2 – Hybrid

Law firm produces fee budget and investors invest 50% of that fee budget in exchange for 20% recovery.

Law firm invests 50% of fee budget billings in exchange for 20% of recovery

Over 30 other risk sharing finance opportunity structures exist. Let’s discuss!

The investor/financier steps:

1. NDA execution

2. Drafting of a term sheet

3. Due diligence review and approval of law firm

4. Funding agreement production

5. Monitoring of the case

6. Resolution via settlement or court award

 

 

 

 

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Are Silicon Valley Tech Giants Robbing Start-ups Blind?

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Silicon Valley Oligarchs pretty much copy and steal anything they want to in Silicon Valley. Are you an entrepreneur who thought the “American Dream” of inventing a great product and becoming rich is still alive? Forget about it!

If you make something great, one of the bosses at Google or Twitter could steal it, copy it and never pay you a dime. The FTC, SEC and Congress have now been asked to take a look:

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As tech companies get richer, is it 'game over' for startups?

Young firms struggle to compete as deep-pocketed companies like Facebook and Amazon clone products and consolidate their power

The leading tech companies are making it harder for startups to attract investment. Photograph: Alvarez/Getty Images

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Olivia SolonTHE GUARDIAN

@oliviasolon

Facebook has been breathing down the neck of the group video-chat app Houseparty for over a year. The app, developed by the San Francisco startup Life On Air, has been a hit with teenagers – an audience Facebook is desperate to woo.

After months of sniffing around its tiny competitor and even inviting the team to its headquarters last summer, Facebook launched its own group video chat tool within Messenger in December 2016. In February, it invited teens to its headquarters to quiz them, in return for $275 Amazon cards, on how and why they used video-chat apps. By July, Facebook was demonstrating a Houseparty clone, Bonfire, to employees and by early September the app launched in Denmark.

They see we’re having traction,” Sima Sistani, co-founder of Houseparty, told the Wall Street Journal in August. “That’s why we’re pushing so hard.”

Pushing hard might not be enough when you’re going up against some of the world’s most powerful companies keen to cling to their empires.

Startups drive job creation and innovation, but the number of new business launches is at a 30-year low and some economists, investors and entrepreneurs are pointing their fingers at big tech.

For one thing, the deep pockets and resources of companies like Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple – with a combined value of almost $2.5tn – make it increasingly difficult for startups to compete or attract investment.

People are not getting funded because Amazon might one day compete with them,” said one founder, who wished to remain anonymous. “If it was startup versus startup, it would have been a fair fight, but startup versus Amazon and it’s game over.”

Even multibillion-dollar startups like Snap, Snapchat’s parent company, struggle to compete against these tech titans.

Like Houseparty, Snap was nipping at the heels of Facebook. At first, Facebook played nicely, making an offer to buy Snapchat – a strategy that worked with Instagram and WhatsApp. When that failed, Facebook cloned all of Snapchat’s features, awkwardly at first but relentlessly and with the resources of a $510bn company, until Snap’s potential slice of the advertising market shriveled to a sliver.

While there’s a clear correlation, it’s hard to say for sure whether concentration of money is the cause or effect of the startup decline. On one hand, the existence of fewer new startups makes it easier for incumbent firms to accumulate more power. However, as industries become more concentrated, it also raises the barriers to new entrepreneurship, choking off innovation elsewhere in the marketplace.

They are financing the next generation research at a scale that no one else can afford,” said Tomasz Tunguz, a venture capitalist, citing Google’s experimental projects Loon (balloon-powered internet), Fiber (high-speed internet) and Waymo (self-driving cars). “They are playing in big markets, making big bets. Historically, that’s been the domain of startups.”

As those companies get more powerful and staff salaries get higher, there’s even less of an incentive for workers to leave and set up on their own, which used to be a common pathway for entrepreneurs. If they do leave, the endgame is often to be acquired by their previous employer rather than grow large enough to compete with it.

If your strategy from the outset is to be acquired by Google, that’s just fueling consolidation,” said Ian Hathaway, an economist at the Brookings Institution.

Jonathan Frankel was thrilled when Amazon’s investment arm funneled $5.6m into his startup Nucleus after a year of discussions. He was less thrilled when, a year later, Amazon launched its latest voice-controlled device, the Echo Show: an almost perfect clone of the Nucleus product.

Nucleus was an Alexa-powered tablet computer that focused on video conferencing and communication, with a plan – that Amazon’s investment arm would have seen – to move into other areas. When the Echo Show launched, it too focused on communication, the core of Nucleus’s vision, instead of other key features like e-commerce or connected home elements.

Frankel, who declined to comment for this piece, was furious, telling Recode earlier this year: “Their thesis is what our thesis was: communication is that Trojan horse to get those devices throughout the home and throughout the extended family’s home.

The difference is, they want to sell more detergent; we actually want to help families communicate easier.”

These kinds of tactics have rattled investors, some founders said, making it harder for startups to raise money even if they’re in an adjacent market – particularly those skirting Amazon and Facebook.

A venture capitalist confirms this, describing Amazon’s launch of an almost identical product as a “very, very strange coincidence”.

At the end of the day, Amazon could be theoretically in nearly any consumer business in the world,” he said, adding that he was frequently in meetings where investment decisions are informed by the question: “Can Amazon do that?”

Amazon can do anything,” he noted.

'From heroes to villains': tech industry faces bipartisan backlash in Washington

It’s not just a problem within the tech industry. Since 1980, the share of companies less than a year old has almost halved – from 15% of companies to just 8.1%, according to Census Bureau data. The total number of startups formed in 2015 (the last year surveyed) was 414,000 – a huge drop from the pre-recession figure of 558,000 in 2006.

It’s been a persistent and fairly precipitous decline,” said John Dearie, the founder of the Center for American Entrepreneurship, an organization set up to address the decline. “The reason why this is so troubling is that new businesses account for virtually all new job creation and account disproportionately for disruptive innovations.”

It’s not a coincidence that at a time when the startup rate is in a long-term decline, the economy has not grown at 3% or better,” said Dearie. “We are in a growth emergency.”

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It gets worse, read this article >> : Inventors Who Changed the World and Got Screwed in Return 1.2.pdf

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Scott received issued U.S. patents and trade secret filing certs on a technology that uses ions to move vehicles and spacecraft and NASA has now proven that it works

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ION propulsion now works on Earth and in space!

This Overlooked Theory Could Be The Missing Piece That Explains How The EM Drive Works

What if it doesn't break the laws of physics?

FIONA MACDONALD

Ever since the EM drive first made headlines, science lovers have puzzled over how the propulsion system seems to produce thrust, despite the fact it's 'impossible' according to one of the most fundamental laws of physics - Newton's third law of motion.

Now a team of physicists have put forward an alternative explanation - it turns out the EM drive could actually work without breaking any scientific laws, if we factor in a weird and often overlooked idea in quantum physics - pilot wave theory.

For those who need a refresher, the crux of the problem here is that the EM, or electromagnetic, drive appears to produce thrust without any fuel or propellant.

That's awesome because it means we can get to space with way less pay load - it's proposed it could even get us to Mars within 72 days.

But it's also perplexing, because, according to Newton's third law, every action must have an equal and opposite reaction. So without pushing any propellant out one end, the drive shouldn't be able to produce thrust in the opposite direction.

Still, as a NASA peer-reviewed paper showed last year, the drive does produce thrust, at least as far as we can currently tell. And a relatively large amount of thrust at that. We just don't know how.

So either our understanding of physics isn't right, or we're missing a big piece of the puzzle when it comes to the EM drive.

A new paper published in The Journal of Applied Physical Science International makes the argument that what we're missing is pilot wave theory - a slightly controversial alternative interpretation of quantum mechanics.

Researchers José Croca and Paulo Castro from the Centre for Philosophy of Sciences of the University of Lisbon in Portugal suggest that not only could pilot wave theory explain the mysterious behaviour of the EM drive, it could help to make it even more powerful.

"We have found that applying a pilot wave theory to NASA's EM drive frustum [or cone], we could explain its thrust without involving any external action applied to the system, as Newton's third law would require," Castro told ScienceAlert via email.

So what is pilot wave theory? Currently, the majority of physicists subscribe to the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, which states that particles do not have defined locations until they are observed.

Pilot wave theory, on the other hand, suggests that particles do have precise positions at all times, but in order for this to be the case, the world must also be strange in other ways – which is why many physicists have dismissed the idea.

But in recent years, the pilot wave theory has been increasing in popularity. The team has shown in its latest paper this theory could be tweaked slightly to apply to something bigger. Say, the EM drive. And it could explain the results we've been seeing.

Basically, pilot wave theory says that an object radiates a wave field, and it is then pulled or attracted to regions of that field that have higher intensity or energy density. In that way, the wave field is actually 'piloting' the object, hence the name.

Through modelling, the team showed that a sufficiently strong and asymmetrical electromagnetic field could act as a pilot wave. And that's exactly what the EM drive generates.

Because the cone, or frustum, of the EM drive is asymmetrical, it would also generate an asymmetrical wave field. As a result, the walls of the EM drive would move towards the areas of higher intensity, creating thrust.

While that might sound pretty out there, this was also actually a possible solution put forward by the NASA Eagleworks researchers in their seminal paper last year where they first reported the thrust generated by their device:

"[The] supporting physics model used to derive a force based on operating conditions in the test article can be categorised as a nonlocal hidden-variable theory, or pilot-wave theory for short."

To be clear, the researchers from the University of Lisbon haven't tested their proposal in a real device as yet.

They've only shown that it's possible, from a modelling point of view, for a pilot wave to guide the EM drive. But they've also shown how the idea could actually be tested in future.

"At the moment the most stringent empirical evidence comes from the EM drive behaviour," Castro told ScienceAlert. "However, we have also devised an experiment to detect and modulate subquantum waves."

Importantly, if the hypothesis is confirmed, it would mean the EM drive would not have to break Newton's third law. And the team hopes this might result in the device being taken seriously and more widely tested.

"EM drive is the future of space propelling motors," they said. "[Although] it will perhaps find its initial application in nano satellites or nano drones, at least before the effect can be scaled up to heavier machines."

Importantly, if a pilot wave does explain the thrust behind the device, then it could also lead to a way to make the propulsion system even more powerful in future, and it's as simple as tweaking the shape.

"We have seen that the effect could be enhanced using a different shape for the frustum," said Castro. "In fact a trumpet exponential form is expected to increase the thrust."

The team is now considering building its own experimental set up to study the phenomena and has invited anyone interested in the project to get in touch.

In the meantime, the NASA Eagleworks team continues to test out its device. And there are also groups looking to test the EM drive in space - or according to some rumours, already doing so - which would really show once and for all whether it works.

There's a lot we have yet to learn about the mysterious EM drive and it's a topic that continues to divide the science world. But whether or not it ends up being the future of space travel, at least it's teaching us more about the physics that govern our world.

The new research has been published in The Journal of Applied Physical Science International.

 

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How My Science Teams Can See Everything: The Laser Raman Spectroscopic Study Device

Seeing The Invisible...

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How My Science Teams Can See Everything: The Laser Raman Spectroscopic Study Device

Want to know about every toxin in your home, food or air? Want to see what is in that beverage you are about to drink? You can look at any object and know what it is and what it is made of with our E-Glasses interface. You can tune your life like you tune your music. You can dial-out certain substances and dial-in others. Our trade secret and patent-pending protected technology is the i-Pod of personal science. While large systems in this field exist, there is nothing out there for "regular folks". As they say: "If you can't buy it at Walgreens or Rite Aid, who cares?..." The technology is 100% functional right now. Factory DFM and volume price-point reduction is the final challenge.

A new gadget we are working on will let you put a device in your pocket that can tell you about every substance you put inside your body. It uses solid state lasers and other interesting things. What is the science behind part of it? Let’s take a look:

Micro-Laser Raman Spectroscopy is a spectroscopic analysis technique used to observe vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes in a system.[1] Raman spectroscopy is commonly used in chemistry to provide a visual structure fingerprint by which molecules, and that which they make up, can be identified. It can see the particles that make up that which is around you by identifying their molucular components.

It relies on inelastic scattering, or Raman scattering, of monochromatic light, usually from a laser in the visible, near infrared, or near ultraviolet range. The laser light interacts with molecular vibrations, phonons, or other excitations in the system, resulting in the energy of the laser photons being shifted up or down. The shift in energy gives information about the vibrational modes in the system. Infrared spectroscopy yields similar, but complementary, information.

Typically, a sample is illuminated with a laser beam. Electromagnetic radiation from the illuminated spot is collected with a lens and sent through a monochromator. Elastic scattered radiation at the wavelength corresponding to the laser line (Rayleigh scattering) is filtered out by either a notch filter, edge pass filter, or a band pass filter, while the rest of the collected light is dispersed onto a detector.

Spontaneous Raman scattering is typically very weak, and as a result the main difficulty of Raman spectroscopy is separating the weak inelastically scattered light from the intense Rayleigh scattered laser light. Historically, Raman spectrometers used holographic gratings and multiple dispersion stages to achieve a high degree of laser rejection. In the past, photomultipliers were the detectors of choice for dispersive Raman setups, which resulted in long acquisition times. However, modern instrumentation almost universally employs notch or edge filters for laser rejection and spectrographs either axial transmissive (AT), Czerny–Turner (CT) monochromator, or FT (Fourier transform spectroscopy based), and CCD detectors.

The advanced types of Raman spectroscopy include surface-enhanced Raman, resonance Raman, tip-enhanced Raman, polarized Raman, stimulated Raman (analogous to stimulated emission), transmission Raman, spatially offset Raman, and hyper Raman.

The Raman effect occurs when electromagnetic radiation interacts with a solid, liquid, or gaseous molecule’s polarizable electron density and bonds. The spontaneous effect is a form of inelastic light scattering, where a photon excites the molecule in either the ground (lowest energy) or excited rovibronic state (a rotational and vibrational energy level within an electronic state). This excitation puts the molecule into a virtual energy state for a short time before the photon scatters inelastically. Inelastic scattering means that the scattered photon can be of either lower or higher energy than the incoming photon, compared to elastic, or Rayleigh, scattering where the scattered photon has the same energy as the incoming photon. After interacting with the photon, the molecule is in a different rotational or vibrational state. This change in energy between the initial and final rovibronic states causes the scattered photon's frequency to shift away from the excitation wavelength (that of the incoming photon), called the Rayleigh line.

For the total energy of the system to remain constant after the molecule moves to a new rovibronic state, the scattered photon shifts to a different energy, and therefore a different frequency. This energy difference is equal to that between the initial and final rovibronic states of the molecule. If the final state is higher in energy than the initial state, the scattered photon will be shifted to a lower frequency (lower energy) so that the total energy remains the same. This shift in frequency is called a Stokes shift, or downshift. If the final state is lower in energy, the scattered photon will be shifted to a higher frequency, which is called an anti-Stokes shift, or upshift.

For a molecule to exhibit a Raman effect, there must be a change in its electric dipole-electric dipole polarizability with respect to the vibrational coordinate corresponding to the rovibronic state. The intensity of the Raman scattering is proportional to this polarizability change. Therefore, the Raman spectrum, scattering intensity as a function of the frequency shifts, depends on the rovibronic states of the molecule.

The Raman effect is based on the interaction between the electron cloud of a sample and the external electrical field of the monochromatic light, which can create an induced dipole moment within the molecule based on its polarizability. Because the laser light does not excite the molecule there can be no real transition between energy levels.[2] The Raman effect should not be confused with emission (fluorescence or phosphorescence), where a molecule in an excited electronic state emits a photon and returns to the ground electronic state, in many cases to a vibrationally excited state on the ground electronic state potential energy surface. Raman scattering also contrasts with infrared (IR) absorption, where the energy of the absorbed photon matches the difference in energy between the initial and final rovibronic states. The dependence of Raman on the electric dipole-electric dipole polarizability derivative also differs from IR spectroscopy, which depends on the electric dipole moment derivative, the atomic polar tensor (APT). This contrasting feature allows rovibronic transitions that might not be active in IR to be analyzed using Raman spectroscopy, as exemplified by the rule of mutual exclusion in centrosymmetric molecules. Transitions which have large Raman intensities often have weak IR intensities and vice versa. A third vibrational spectroscopy technique, inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (IINS), can be used to determine the frequencies of vibrations in highly symmetric molecules that may be both IR and Raman inactive. The IINS selection rules, or allowed transitions, differ from those of IR and Raman, so the three techniques are complementary. They all give the same frequency for a given vibrational transition, but the relative intensities provide different information due to the different types of interaction between the molecule and the incoming particles, photons for IR and Raman, and neutrons for IINS.

Although the inelastic scattering of light was predicted by Adolf Smekal in 1923,[3] it was not observed in practice until 1928. The Raman effect was named after one of its discoverers, the Indian scientist Sir C. V. Raman, who observed the effect by means of sunlight (1928, together with K. S. Krishnan and independently by Grigory Landsberg and Leonid Mandelstam).[1] Raman won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1930 for this discovery accomplished using sunlight, a narrow-band photographic filter to create monochromatic light, and a "crossed filter" to block this monochromatic light. He found that a small amount of light had changed frequency and passed through the "crossed" filter.

Systematic pioneering theory of the Raman effect was developed by Czechoslovak physicist George Placzek between 1930 and 1934.[4] The mercury arc became the principal light source, first with photographic detection and then with spectrophotometric detection.

In the years following its discovery, Raman spectroscopy was used to provide the first catalog of molecular vibrational frequencies. Originally, heroic measures were required to obtain Raman spectra due to the low sensitivity of the technique. Typically, the sample was held in a long tube and illuminated along its length with a beam of filtered monochromatic light generated by a gas discharge lamp. The photons that were scattered by the sample were collected through an optical flat at the end of the tube. To maximize the sensitivity, the sample was highly concentrated (1 M or more) and relatively large volumes (5 mL or more) were used. Consequently, the use of Raman spectroscopy dwindled when commercial IR spectrophotometers became available in the 1940s. However, the advent of the laser in the 1960s resulted in simplified Raman spectroscopy instruments and also boosted the sensitivity of the technique. This has revived the use of Raman spectroscopy as a common analytical technique.

Raman shifts are typically reported in wavenumbers, which have units of inverse length, as this value is directly related to energy. In order to convert between spectral wavelength and wavenumbers of shift in the Raman spectrum.

Raman spectroscopy is used in chemistry to identify molecules and study chemical bonding. Because vibrational frequencies are specific to a molecule’s chemical bonds and symmetry (the fingerprint region of organic molecules is in the wavenumber range 500–1500 cm−1,[5] Raman provides a fingerprint to identify molecules. For instance, Raman and IR spectra were used to determine the vibrational frequencies of SiO, Si2O2, and Si3O3 on the basis of normal coordinate analyses.[6] Raman is also used to study the addition of a substrate to an enzyme.

In solid-state physics, Raman spectroscopy is used to characterize materials, measure temperature, and find the crystallographic orientation of a sample. As with single molecules, a solid material can be identified by characteristic phonon modes. Information on the population of a phonon mode is given by the ratio of the Stokes and anti-Stokes intensity of the spontaneous Raman signal. Raman spectroscopy can also be used to observe other low frequency excitations of a solid, such as plasmons, magnons, and superconducting gap excitations. Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) uses the Raman-shifted backscatter from laser pulses to determine the temperature along optical fibers. The orientation of an anisotropic crystal can be found from the polarization of Raman-scattered light with respect to the crystal and the polarization of the laser light, if the crystal structure’s point group is known.

In nanotechnology, a Raman microscope can be used to analyze nanowires to better understand their structures, and the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes is commonly used to evaluate their diameter.

Raman active fibers, such as aramid and carbon, have vibrational modes that show a shift in Raman frequency with applied stress. Polypropylene fibers exhibit similar shifts.

In solid state chemistry and the bio-pharmaceutical industry, Raman spectroscopy can be used to not only identify active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), but to identify their polymorphic forms, if more than one exist. For example, the drug Cayston (aztreonam), marketed by Gilead Sciences for cystic fibrosis,[7] can be identified and characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopy. Using the correct polymorphic form in bio-pharmaceutical formulations is critical, since different forms have different physical properties, like solubility and melting point.

Raman spectroscopy has a wide variety of applications in biology and medicine. It has helped confirm the existence of low-frequency phonons[8] in proteins and DNA,[9][10][11][12] promoting studies of low-frequency collective motion in proteins and DNA and their biological functions.[13][14] Raman reporter molecules with olefin or alkyne moieties are being developed for tissue imaging with SERS-labeled antibodies.[15] Raman spectroscopy has also been used as a noninvasive technique for real-time, in situ biochemical characterization of wounds. Multivariate analysis of Raman spectra has enabled development of a quantitative measure for wound healing progress.[16] Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), which is less sensitive to surface layers than conventional Raman, can be used to discover counterfeit drugs without opening their packaging, and to non-invasively study biological tissue.[17] A huge reason why Raman spectroscopy is so useful in biological applications is because its results often do not face interference from water molecules, due to the fact that they have permanent dipole moments, and as a result, the Raman scattering cannot be picked up on. This is a large advantage, specifically in biological applications.[18] Raman spectroscopy also has a wide usage for studying biominerals.[19] Lastly, Raman gas analyzers have many practical applications, including real-time monitoring of anesthetic and respiratory gas mixtures during surgery.

Raman spectroscopy is an efficient and non-destructive way to investigate works of art.[20] Identifying individual pigments in paintings and their degradation products provides insight into the working method of the artist. It also gives information about the original state of the painting in cases where the pigments degraded with age.[21] In addition to paintings, Raman spectroscopy can be used to investigate the chemical composition of historical documents (such as the Book of Kells), which can provide insight about the social and economic conditions when they were created.[22] It also offers a noninvasive way to determine the best method of preservation or conservation of such materials.

Raman spectroscopy has been used in several research projects as a means to detect explosives from a safe distance using laser beams.[23][24][25] Airports and transit areas in NY City and Paris now use laser explosive detection.

Raman Spectroscopy is being further developed so it could be used in the clinical setting. Raman4Clinic is a European organization that is working on incorporating Raman Spectroscopy techniques in the medical field. They are currently working on different projects, one of them being monitoring cancer using bodily fluids such as urine and blood samples which are easily accessible. This technique would be less stressful on the patients than constantly having to take biopsies which are not always risk free.[26]

Handheld spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) has just been developed for a novel application to food security, in this case counterfeiting/food fraud. The first time such a handheld device has been used in a food or beverage product, it was able to detect multiple chemical markers of counterfeit alcohol in extremely low concentrations. This included six denaturants and four additives commonly used by counterfeiters worldwide. This was achievable directly through the bottle without any contact with the sample and through multiple colours of commercial bottles of a variety of spirit drinks.[27]

 

 

Comparison of topographical (AFM, top) and Raman images of GaSe. Scale bar is 5 μm.[28]

Raman spectroscopy offers several advantages for microscopic analysis. Since it is a scattering technique, specimens do not need to be fixed or sectioned. Raman spectra can be collected from a very small volume (< 1 µm in diameter); these spectra allow the identification of species present in that volume. Water does not generally interfere with Raman spectral analysis. Thus, Raman spectroscopy is suitable for the microscopic examination of minerals, materials such as polymers and ceramics, cells, proteins and forensic trace evidence. A Raman microscope begins with a standard optical microscope, and adds an excitation laser, a monochromator, and a sensitive detector (such as a charge-coupled device (CCD), or photomultiplier tube (PMT)). FT-Raman has also been used with microscopes. Ultraviolet microscopes and UV enhanced optics must be used when a UV laser source is used for Raman microspectroscopy.

In direct imaging, the whole field of view is examined for scattering over a small range of wavenumbers (Raman shifts). For instance, a wavenumber characteristic for cholesterol could be used to record the distribution of cholesterol within a cell culture.

The other approach is hyperspectral imaging or chemical imaging, in which thousands of Raman spectra are acquired from all over the field of view. The data can then be used to generate images showing the location and amount of different components. Taking the cell culture example, a hyperspectral image could show the distribution of cholesterol, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, and fatty acids. Sophisticated signal- and image-processing techniques can be used to ignore the presence of water, culture media, buffers, and other interference.

Raman microscopy, and in particular confocal microscopy, has very high spatial resolution. For example, the lateral and depth resolutions were 250 nm and 1.7 µm, respectively, using a confocal Raman microspectrometer with the 632.8 nm line from a helium–neon laser with a pinhole of 100 µm diameter. Since the objective lenses of microscopes focus the laser beam to several micrometres in diameter, the resulting photon flux is much higher than achieved in conventional Raman setups. This has the added benefit of enhanced fluorescence quenching. However, the high photon flux can also cause sample degradation, and for this reason some setups require a thermally conducting substrate (which acts as a heat sink) in order to mitigate this process. Another approach called global Raman imaging[29] uses complete monochromatic images instead of reconstruction of images from acquired spectra. This technique is being used for the characterization of large scale devices, mapping of different compounds and dynamics study. It has already been use for the characterization of graphene layers,[30] J-aggregated dyes inside carbon nanotubes[31] and multiple other 2D materials such as MoS2 and WSe2. Since the excitation beam is dispersed over the whole field of view, those measurements can be done without damaging the sample.

By using Raman microspectroscopy, in vivo time- and space-resolved Raman spectra of microscopic regions of samples can be measured. As a result, the fluorescence of water, media, and buffers can be removed. Consequently, in vivo time- and space-resolved Raman spectroscopy is suitable to examine proteins, cells and organs.

Raman microscopy for biological and medical specimens generally uses near-infrared (NIR) lasers (785 nm diodes and 1064 nm Nd:YAG are especially common). The use of these lower energy wavelengths reduces the risk of damaging the specimen. However, the intensity of NIR Raman is low (owing to the ω4 dependence of Raman scattering intensity), and most detectors require very long collection times. Recently advances were made which had no destructive effect on mitochondria in the observation of changes in cytochrome c structure that occur in the process of electron transport and ATP synthesis.[32]

Sensitive detectors have become available, making the technique better suited to general use. Raman microscopy of inorganic specimens, such as rocks and ceramics and polymers, can use a broader range of excitation wavelengths.[33]

The polarization of the Raman scattered light also contains useful information. This property can be measured using (plane) polarized laser excitation and a polarization analyzer. Spectra acquired with the analyzer set at both perpendicular and parallel to the excitation plane can be used to calculate the depolarization ratio. Study of the technique is useful in teaching the connections between group theory, symmetry, Raman activity, and peaks in the corresponding Raman spectra.[34] Polarized light only gives access to some of the Raman active modes. By rotating the polarization you can gain access to the other modes. Each mode is separated according to its symmetry.[35]

The spectral information arising from this analysis gives insight into molecular orientation and vibrational symmetry. In essence, it allows the user to obtain valuable information relating to the molecular shape, for example in synthetic chemistry or polymorph analysis. It is often used to understand macromolecular orientation in crystal lattices, liquid crystals or polymer samples.[36]

It is convenient in polarised Raman spectroscopy to describe the propagation and polarisation directions using Porto's notation,[37] described by and named after Brazilian physicist Sergio Pereira da Silva Porto.

Variants

Several variations of Raman spectroscopy have been developed. The usual purpose is to enhance the sensitivity (e.g., surface-enhanced Raman), to improve the spatial resolution (Raman microscopy), or to acquire very specific information (resonance Raman).

  • Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy – Term used to describe Raman spectroscopy without enhancement of sensitivity.

  • Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) – Normally done in a silver or gold colloid or a substrate containing silver or gold. Surface plasmons of silver and gold are excited by the laser, resulting in an increase in the electric fields surrounding the metal. Given that Raman intensities are proportional to the electric field, there is large increase in the measured signal (by up to 1011). This effect was originally observed by Martin Fleischmann but the prevailing explanation was proposed by Van Duyne in 1977.[38] A comprehensive theory of the effect was given by Lombardi and Birke.[39]

  • Resonance Raman spectroscopy – The excitation wavelength is matched to an electronic transition of the molecule or crystal, so that vibrational modes associated with the excited electronic state are greatly enhanced. This is useful for studying large molecules such as polypeptides, which might show hundreds of bands in "conventional" Raman spectra. It is also useful for associating normal modes with their observed frequency shifts.[40]

  • Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) – A combination of SERS and resonance Raman spectroscopy that uses proximity to a surface to increase Raman intensity, and excitation wavelength matched to the maximum absorbance of the molecule being analysed.

  • Angle-resolved Raman spectroscopy – Not only are standard Raman results recorded but also the angle with respect to the incident laser. If the orientation of the sample is known then detailed information about the phonon dispersion relation can also be gleaned from a single test.[41]

  • Hyper Raman – A non-linear effect in which the vibrational modes interact with the second harmonic of the excitation beam. This requires very high power, but allows the observation of vibrational modes that are normally "silent". It frequently relies on SERS-type enhancement to boost the sensitivity.[42]

  • Optical tweezers Raman spectroscopy (OTRS) – Used to study individual particles, and even biochemical processes in single cells trapped by optical tweezers.

  • Stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) – A pump-probe technique, where a spatially coincident, two color pulse (with polarization either parallel or perpendicular) transfers the population from ground to a rovibrationally excited state. If the difference in energy corresponds to an allowed Raman transition, scattered light will correspond to loss or gain in the pump beam.

  • Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) – The Raman scattering beneath an obscuring surface is retrieved from a scaled subtraction of two spectra taken at two spatially offset points

  • Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) – Two laser beams are used to generate a coherent anti-Stokes frequency beam, which can be enhanced by resonance.

  • Raman optical activity (ROA) – Measures vibrational optical activity by means of a small difference in the intensity of Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized incident light or, equivalently, a small circularly polarized component in the scattered light.[43]

  • Transmission Raman – Allows probing of a significant bulk of a turbid material, such as powders, capsules, living tissue, etc. It was largely ignored following investigations in the late 1960s (Schrader and Bergmann, 1967)[44] but was rediscovered in 2006 as a means of rapid assay of pharmaceutical dosage forms.[45] There are medical diagnostic applications particularly in the detection of cancer.[25][46][47]

  • Inverse Raman spectroscopy.

  • Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) – Uses a metallic (usually silver-/gold-coated AFM or STM) tip to enhance the Raman signals of molecules situated in its vicinity. The spatial resolution is approximately the size of the tip apex (20–30 nm). TERS has been shown to have sensitivity down to the single molecule level and holds some promise for bioanalysis applications.[48]

  • Surface plasmon polariton enhanced Raman scattering (SPPERS) – This approach exploits apertureless metallic conical tips for near field excitation of molecules. This technique differs from the TERS approach due to its inherent capability of suppressing the background field. In fact, when an appropriate laser source impinges on the base of the cone, a TM0 mode[49] (polaritonic mode) can be locally created, namely far away from the excitation spot (apex of the tip). The mode can propagate along the tip without producing any radiation field up to the tip apex where it interacts with the molecule. In this way, the focal plane is separated from the excitation plane by a distance given by the tip length, and no background plays any role in the Raman excitation of the molecule.[50][51][52][53]

  • Micro-cavity substrates – A method that improves the detection limit of conventional Raman spectra using micro-Raman in a micro-cavity coated with reflective Au or Ag. The micro-cavity has a radius of several micrometers and enhances the entire Raman signal by providing multiple excitations of the sample and couples the forward-scattered Raman photons toward the collection optics in the back-scattered Raman geometry.[54]

  • Stand-off remote Raman. In standoff Raman, the sample is measured at a distance from the Raman spectrometer, usually by using a telescope for light collection. Remote Raman spectroscopy was proposed in the 1960s[55] and initially developed for the measurement of atmospheric gases.[56] The technique was extended In 1992 by Angel et al. for standoff Raman detection of hazardous inorganic and organic compounds.[57] Standoff Raman detection offers a fast-Raman mode of analyzing large areas such as a football field in minutes. A pulsed laser source and gated detector allow Raman spectra measurements in the daylight[58] and reduces the long-lived fluorescent background generated by transition ions and rare earth ions. Another way to avoid fluorescence, first demonstrated by Sandy Asher in 1984, is to use a UV laser probe beam. At wavelengths of 260 nm, there is effectively no fluorescence interference and the UV signal is inherently strong.[25][59][60] A 10X beam expander mounted in front of the laser allows focusing of the beam and a telescope is directly coupled through the camera lens for signal collection. With the system's time-gating capability it is possible to measure remote Raman of your distant target and the atmosphere between the laser and target.[25]

 

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SPONSOR, OR INVEST IN, A GREAT NEW TECHNOLOGY

Want To Invest In The Future And Make Money When We Make Money?

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CONTACT OUR TEAM TO FIND OUT ABOUT INVESTING IN, OR SPONSORING, THE FUTURE!

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INVENTIONS: A Nuclear Reactor In Your Pocket?

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Read article at this link: The BetaVolt Ion Battery Can Power Your Car For 50 Years Per Charge.pdf

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INFO: New Resume Site Upgrade Underway

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An updated version of this resume site is in-process. Check back in a few weeks for tons of new info...

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INFO: Robert Half Releases Audit On Technology Staff Compensation Industry Standards

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This fine report updates quantified metrics for technology industry compensation per current standards:

CLICK THIS LINK >>: 2018_salary_guide_NA_technology_1.pdf

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MEDIA: STAR RANGER - Award Winning Video. First 3D VR Theme Park Film Produced Entirely On PC's

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CLICK THIS LINK TO SEE THE VIDEO (Starts after 20 second delay) >> : STAR-RANGER Scott Douglas Redmond Producer Director.m4v

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"...in 1997, "Star Ranger" was considered to be a nearly impossible feat for a couple of simple PC computers to pull off. Up until that time, banks of Linux work-stations and warehouses full of programmers had been required to accomplish similar efforts..."

Scott Douglas Redmond was the Producer, Director and Writer for the project.

CLICK EACH THUMBNAIL, BELOW, FOR STAR RANGER PROJECT GALLERY:

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INFO: With Scott, You Are Only Limited By Your Imagination...

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ideas into tangible deliverables and assets!

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TEAM POSTS: Who Invented-It-First?

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There is always an interesting discussion under-way about who designed, engineered, launched, marketed, patented and deployed certain high technology products and services. This document highlights the key findings on a few of those items:

CLICK THIS LINK FOR DETAILS >> : PAST MILESTONES 1.5.pdf

Why is WHO-DID-IT-FIRST a big deal? Because of this >> :  THE SILICON VALLEY CONUNDRUM.pdf

The answer to that question holds billions of dollars in the balance!

 

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TEAM POSTS: The Silicon Valley Conundrum

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Is the Silicon Valley Cartel a tough bunch of guys? Sometimes...

READ THE BACKGROUNDER AT THIS LINK >> : THE SILICON VALLEY CONUNDRUM.pdf

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OPPORTUNITY: The Innovation Factory Redux

OPPORTUNITY: The Innovation Factory Redux

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OPPORTUNITY: The Innovation Factory Redux

You can invest in our growth. You finance one of these new facilities and you get a percentage of the profits.

Sponsor this auxiliary-expansion project and reap the rewards of a percentage of all of the IP profits from the facility that you sponsor. Be part of an actual "idea and product factory"!

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BE PART OF:

  • 50 engineers and development specialists
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  • At least one new invention filed with the U.S. Government every three days
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CONTACT US to inquire about co-sponsoring an Innovation Factory Redux

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SHOP SHOTS FROM SOME OF SCOTT'S SHOP SPACES:

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INFO: How Scott's Innovation Teams Work

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THE INNOVATION DREAM TEAM: OPPOSITES SUCCEED

Jeanne M. Liedtka and Randy Salzman 

As an increasingly popular approach to business innovation, the crux of design thinking is that it embraces both creativity and analytical thinking to solve problems; two sides of the design thinking coin, both are essential to the design thinking process.

As such, one key to design thinking is for designers to empathize with those who see the world through what Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck calls a “fixed mindset” — many of whom may be corporate or bureaucratic managers — and vice versa. Having learned at an early age that “life’s a test, try not to look stupid,” the fixed mindseter (whom we call “George”) usually digs deeply into a specialty and masters the intricacies of it, while designer-types, who usually enjoy what Dweck calls a “growth mindset,” see life as a journey of discovery and, therefore, have developed a more diverse repertoire.

A Potential Dream Team

There is a natural tension between these two mindsets, as one usually sticks to the same silo, mastering details and becoming reticent about disruptive change, and the other (whom we call “Geoffrey”) bounces in and out of silos, easily bored with those same intricacies and excited by the weird and the new. Like an exhilarating relationship, the smart Geoffrey and smart George become the “opposites who attract,” instead of the antithetical couples who get bogged down in their differences. Keeping the “creative types” and the “numbers people” on the same wavelength produces great ideas firmly anchored in the real world because Geoffreys have the propensity to embrace innovative ideas and Georges have the wisdom to devise tests for managing — not avoiding — any risks associated with Geoffreys’ imagined futures.

Geoffrey’s Turf vs. George’s Turf

The Geoffrey personality dominates in what we call the front end of design thinking, the What is and What if questions, and George’s natural home turf is in the back end, What wows and What works. If George withholds his natural skepticism until several of Geoffrey’s ideas are napkin pitched (when the organizational case for any new idea begins analysis), he is crucial for not allowing pie-in-the-sky ideas to overcome steely-eyed reality thinking. Too often, upper management can be easily awed by creative types and forget that the Geoffreys of the world, highly invested in their “brilliant” ideas, can become blind to any potential flaws. Identifying promising ideas is Geoffrey’s turf; ensuring that the promise is real is George’s.

Together, this is a formidable team. Opposed, this is no team at all. And design thinking, as practiced in the four-question, 15-step model, provides tools and methods for drawing the best of both personalities — whether that personality is literally two separate individuals or two aspects of the same human. One powerful tool is the methodology itself: When a George feels insecure during divergent “If anything were possible” thinking, he is still reassured he’s following a proven methodology and placated by checking off another box in that methodology. Other times, when the team needs to coalesce around design criteria, or assumption testing, or even very early in the process when teams decide whether design thinking is a solid approach for addressing their challenges, George’s attention to detail provides the foundation for Geoffrey’s creative thought.

Empathy Is Essential

Most design thinkers are Geoffreys and, like all humans, can face difficulty understanding others with different worldviews or mindsets. What seems simplicity itself to that Geoffrey personality might seem ridiculous to a George who may — because of his world view — rarely stick his hand up and chance being perceived stupid. The four-question methodology has Geoffreys all but begging Georges to expose flaws — at the right time and place, which is after What if creativity and before the expenditure of major dollars and resources when an organization pilots any new future.

A successful design thinker can use George and Geoffrey cooperation to truly empathize — different than sympathize or judge — with George. George is not stupid, or evil, or a “bean counter” who needs enlightened compassion, he’s rather essential to success because he helps Geoffrey recognize, and address, assumptions. He digs out the details that trip up even the best of ideas, and he does so after the ideas develop but while there is still time to solve those issues, not after Geoffrey has convinced the boss to turn over the checkbook — putting, of course, everyone’s necks on the line.

Jeanne M. Liedtka and Randy Salzman are authors of the upcoming book Design Thinking for the Greater Good: Innovation in the Social Sector (Columbia Business Press), a study of design-led innovation projects in government and social sectors.

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ENERGY: New catalyst found for clean energy fuel

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Scott's patents have a new opportunity...

New catalyst found for clean energy fuel

 by Colin Poitras
 
 
A team of UConn chemists led by professors Steven Suib and James Rusling has developed a new material that could make hydrogen capture more commercially viable and provide a key element for a new generation of cheaper, light-weight hydrogen fuel cells.
 

The new metal-free catalyst uses carbon graphene nanotubes infused with sulfur. Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe and a promising source for clean energy. But producing high-grade hydrogen is an expensive and energy-consuming process. Often, the energy spent extracting hydrogen is worth more than the it produces. Finding a cheaper and more efficient way of capturing hydrogen would go a long way toward the creation of a sustainable hydrogen economy, and would help reduce the world's reliance on fossil fuels.

"We've made a material that looks pretty good," says Suib, Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and director of UConn's Institute of Materials Science. "Our results show that this material is more than competitive with the state-of-the-art materials quoted in literature, and exceptionally good for the reactions we need." Current hydrogen production uses intense heat to separate hydrogen from hydrocarbons found in crude oil. But the resulting hydrogen isn't very pure, and byproducts must be scrubbed out. An alternate process, capturing hydrogen in water, is cleaner and more sustainable, but it too has limitations.

Electrocatalysts involved in this process are usually made of like platinum and iridium. But they are very expensive, making the commercialization of pure hydrogen fuels difficult. Finding a non-metal catalyst that has all of the electrochemical properties of the rare earth metals but can be made at a much reduced cost and still remain stable has been a goal of scientists for years. Suib and Rusling, an expert in electrochemistry, knew that sulfur-infused carbon graphene nanotubes were a potentially efficient non-metal catalyst for an . An oxygen reduction reaction, or ORR, happens when oxygen and are converted to water. The reaction is a key component of hydrogen-based fuel cells. Hydrogen gas used to power the cells passes through a catalyst, currently a corrosive-resistant metal like platinum, causing an oxygen reduction electrochemical reaction that creates energy and – as a byproduct – water.

 

But reversing that process – starting with water and extracting pure hydrogen from it, a procedure known as an oxygen evolution reaction – is much more of a challenge electrochemically. Suib and Rusling, working with a team of graduate students led by Ph.D. candidates Abdelhamid El-Sawy and Islam Mosa, decided to give it a shot.

The key, Suib says, was manipulating the sulfur and carbon atoms to create stable bonds and structures within the nanotubes, while also maintaining or improving the tubes' electrochemical potential so that it mirrored those found in the rare metals. "If you are going to make a hydrogen economy, you need to have new materials that do the same thing as the extremely expensive rare earth metals," says Suib. "But how do you get something that is cheap, durable, and stable enough to be scaled up to industry levels? That was our challenge."

The process developed in Suib's and Rusling's labs uses a dual doping procedure involving sulfur and benzyl disulfide treated at high heat. The researchers had to carefully add heteroatoms of sulfur at extremely low levels to strike the delicate balance needed to maintain usability and stability. Add too much sulfur and the sample would be unstable; not enough and it would be ineffective. Suib says the procedure for isolating hydrogen in water, in a very general way, is similar to trying to separate flour and sand after they've been mixed together thoroughly.

In the end, he says, the sulfur-doped nanotubes used much less energy in the chemical reaction process than other known processes, and were much more active and efficient catalysts than other known products. Most importantly, he points out, the sulfur-infused nanotubes are efficient for both separating from water and reducing oxygen into water. Materials with those dual properties are rare, he notes. "I was surprised, in the end, that it worked so well," Suib says, with a grin. "We thought it might work, but we didn't think it would work so well." Powerful transmission electron microscopes and scanning electron microscopes in UConn's Bioscience Electron Microscopy Lab, Institute of Materials Science, and new FEI Center for Advanced Microscopy and Materials Analysis were instrumental in helping researchers test and characterize the new material as it developed in the lab, Suib says.

Explore further: Inexpensive, efficient bi-metallic electrocatalysts may open floodgates for hydrogen fuel

More information: Abdelhamid M. El-Sawy et al. Controlling the Active Sites of Sulfur-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Nanolobes for Highly Efficient Oxygen Evolution and Reduction Catalysis, Advanced Energy Materials (2016). DOI: 10.1002/aenm.201501966

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-05-catalyst-energy-fuel.html#jCp

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INFO: The Very First "Google"?

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Who made the first "Google"? Let's Take A Look:

 

UNIFREE(TM) and TECH-Mate(TM) are said, by many legal experts, to have been the "very first Google" that Tom Perkins and Larry Page came and looked at before going off to launch their own version of a search engine that became a free-services aggregation provider...

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The original Unifree Search Engine and free-services online tool existed before Google was even created and offered 100% of the same services Google later offered:

UNIFREE

SEARCH: [_______________________________________________________________]


100% of the same services...years before Google existed...reviewed by the founders of Google...with NDA's, federal patent records, emails, videos and phone calls proving the "who-did-it-first" arguement

About:

TECHMATE and Unifree were created by Scott Douglas Redmond in San Francisco as an expansion of his work on virtual reality networks. His, and his Team’s, work has continued, and patents have continued to issue, up to today. UNIFREE was launched on the web and has always operated as an on-line search engine and search web services offering. Previously filed patents and federal records prove pre-existence of the technology, company and website prior to the existence of Google. Larry Page met Scott at Stanford University and in Bay Area technology club meetings. As the name implies, UNIFREE is a collection of UNIVERSALLY FREE on-line services such as mail, video, search, social networking, messaging, VOIP, etc., UNIVERSALLY available for the world population integrated across a common front end. Unifree is a web-site service offering based around a main launch-page which, exactly like the later “Google”, offers all of the free on-line services that Google offers today, with a particular emphasis on on-line media. The United States Patent Office Trademark filings and records describe the free UNIFREE online services center in a manner which many observers feel describes the LATER creation of Google.

The State of California confirms that UNIFREE LLC existed with a California Entity Number as of 11/12/1997 at Plaintiffs incubator address in San Francisco, CA. The public interest ranking algorithm that Plaintiffs created to automatically determine which links to services would be ranked above others on the home page was called “mombot” ™ . It was a robotic formula which acted as the internet mom for your web experiences, just as Google does today. Unifree was fully operational on the world wide web far earlier than Google existed. On February 4, 1998 Scott executed a Non-Disclosure Business Partnership development agreement with Yahoo, inc. for UNIFREE partnership and acquisition discussions, and engaged in numerous time-stamped email communications with funding inquiries and fishing expedition inquiries from Google venture capital investors.

Scott received White House commendation letters, on White House letterhead, for his work on these social networks.

Scott and UNIFREE were featured on a nationally broadcast hour long TV show on FOX discussing the technology. The name Google was formally incorporated on September 4, 1998 at girlfriend Susan Wojcicki‘s apartment in Menlo Park, California. The first patent filed under the name “Google Inc.” was filed on August 31, 1999. This patent, filed by Siu-Leong Iu, Malcom Davis, Hui Luo, Yun-Ting Lin, Guillaume Mercier, and Kobad Bugwadia, is titled “Watermarking System and Methodology for Digital Multimedia Content” and is the earliest patent filing under the assignee name “Google Inc.”12][13].

Our associate Rajeev Motwani worked with early Google staff on this watermarking technology which was a way to track users activities without their knowledge. The social media aspect of Plaintiff’s internet engine was deployed as the TECHMATE ™ social network long before the Google founders had even met each other. Techmate was advertised in Bay Area newspaper display advertising and certified by the State of California in filed public records with the Secretary of State on March 1, 1987. Did Scott and his team invent Google? Did the founders of Google simply copy something from Plaintiff and add a weird name to it?

SCREEN SHOT FROM 1996:

 

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Does Larry Page at Google Steal Technology For Google? The New York Times Thinks So:

 

How Larry Page’s Obsessions Became Google’s Business

한국어로 읽기 Read in Korean

By CONOR DOUGHERTY

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Credit Minh Uong/The New York Times

Three years ago, Charles Chase, an engineer who manages Lockheed Martin’s nuclear fusion program, was sitting on a white leather couch at Google’s Solve for X conference when a man he had never met knelt down to talk to him.

They spent 20 minutes discussing how much time, money and technology separated humanity from a sustainable fusion reaction — that is, how to produce clean energy by mimicking the sun’s power — before Mr. Chase thought to ask the man his name.

“I’m Larry Page,” the man said. He realized he had been talking to Google’s billionaire co-founder and chief executive.

“He didn’t have any sort of pretension like he shouldn’t be talking to me or ‘Don’t you know who you’re talking to?’” Mr. Chase said. “We just talked.”

Continue reading the main story

 

Larry Page is not a typical chief executive, and in many of the most visible ways, he is not a C.E.O. at all. Corporate leaders tend to spend a good deal of time talking at investor conferences or introducing new products on auditorium stages. Mr. Page, who is 42, has not been on an earnings call since 2013, and the best way to find him at Google I/O — an annual gathering where the company unveils new products — is to ignore the main stage and follow the scrum of fans and autograph seekers who mob him in the moments he steps outside closed doors.

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A prototype for a car Google is developing. Credit Google

But just because he has faded from public view does not mean he is a recluse. He is a regular at robotics conferences and intellectual gatherings like TED. Scientists say he is a good bet to attend Google’s various academic gatherings, like Solve for X and Sci Foo Camp, where he can be found having casual conversations about technology or giving advice to entrepreneurs.

Mr. Page is hardly the first Silicon Valley chief with a case of intellectual wanderlust, but unlike most of his peers, he has invested far beyond his company’s core business and in many ways has made it a reflection of his personal fascinations.

He intends to push even further with Alphabet, a holding company that separates Google’s various cash-rich advertising businesses from the list of speculative projects like self-driving cars that capture the imagination but do not make much money. Alphabet companies and investments span disciplines from biotechnology to energy generation to space travel to artificial intelligence to urban planning.

Investors will get a good look at the scope of those ambitions on Feb. 1, when the company, in its fourth-quarter earnings report, will disclose for the first time the costs and income of the collection of projects outside of Google’s core business.

As chief executive of Alphabet, Mr. Page is tasked with figuring how to spin Google’s billions in advertising profits into new companies and industries. When he announced the reorganization last summer, he said that he and Sergey Brin, Google’s other founder, would do this by finding new people and technologies to invest in, while at the same time slimming down Google — now called Google Inc., a subsidiary of Alphabet — so their leaders would have more autonomy.

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Sundar Pichai, chief of Google Inc. Credit Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

“In general, our model is to have a strong C.E.O. who runs each business, with Sergey and me in service to them as needed,” Mr. Page wrote in a letter to investors. He said that he and Mr. Brin would be responsible for picking those chief executives, monitoring their progress and determining their pay.

Google’s day-to-day management was left to Sundar Pichai, the company’s new chief executive. His job will not be about preventing cancer or launching rocket ships, but to keep Google’s advertising machine humming, to keep innovating in emerging areas like machine learning and virtual reality — all while steering the company through a thicket of regulatory troubles that could drag on for years.

Mr. Page’s new role is part talent scout and part technology visionary. He still has to find the chief executives of many of the other Alphabet businesses.

And he has said on several occasions that he spends a good deal of time researching new technologies, focusing on what kind of financial or logistic hurdles stand in the way of them being invented or carried out.

His presence at technology events, while just a sliver of his time, is indicative of a giant idea-scouting mission that has in some sense been going on for years but is now Mr. Page’s main job.

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Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google, wearing Google Glass. Credit Carlo Allegri/Reuters

In the investor letter, he put it this way: “Sergey and I are seriously in the business of starting new things.”

An Interest in Cool Things

Mr. Page has always had a wide range of interests. As an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, he worked on solar cars, music synthesizers and once proposed that the school build a tram through campus. He arrived at Stanford’s computer science doctorate program in 1995, and had a list of initial research ideas, including self-driving cars and using the web’s many hyperlinks to improve Internet search. His thesis adviser, Terry Winograd, steered him toward search.

“Even before he came to Stanford he was interested in cool technical things that could be done,” Mr. Winograd said. “What makes something interesting for him is a big technical challenge. It’s not so much where it’s headed but what the ride is like.”

Inside Google, Mr. Page is known for asking a lot of questions about how people do their jobs and challenging their assumptions about why things are as they are. In an interview at the Fortune Global Forum last year, Mr. Page said he enjoyed talking to people who ran the company’s data centers.

“I ask them, like, ‘How does the transformer work?’ ‘How does the power come in?’ ‘What do we pay for that?’” he said. “And I’m thinking about it kind of both as an entrepreneur and as a business person. And I’m thinking ‘What are those opportunities?’”

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LinkNYC Wi-Fi consoles, a product of Sidewalk Labs, a company owned by Google. Credit Cole Wilson for The New York Times

Another question he likes to ask: “Why can’t this be bigger?”

Mr. Page declined multiple requests for comment, and many of the people who spoke about him requested anonymity because they were not supposed to talk about internal company matters.

Many former Google employees who have worked directly with Mr. Page said his managerial modus operandi was to take new technologies or product ideas and generalize them to as many areas as possible. Why can’t Google Now, Google’s predictive search tool, be used to predict everything about a person’s life? Why create a portal to shop for insurance when you can create a portal to shop for every product in the world?

But corporate success means corporate sprawl, and recently Google has seen a number of engineers and others leave for younger rivals like Facebook and start-ups like Uber. Mr. Page has made personal appeals to some of them, and, at least in a few recent cases, has said he is worried that the company has become a difficult place for entrepreneurs, according to people who have met with him.

Part of Mr. Page’s pitch included emphasizing how dedicated he was to “moonshots” like interplanetary travel, or offering employees time and money to pursue new projects of their own. By breaking Google into Alphabet, Mr. Page is hoping to make it a more welcoming home for employees to build new businesses, as well as for potential acquisition targets.

It will also rid his office of the kind of dull-but-necessary annoyances of running a major corporation. Several recently departed Google staff members said that as chief executive of Google, Mr. Page had found himself in the middle of various turf wars, like how to integrate Google Plus, the company’s struggling social media effort, with other products like YouTube, or where to put Google Now, which resided in the Android team but was moved to the search group.

 
What Is Separated Under Alphabet?
  • Google: search, advertising, maps, YouTube and Android.
  • Calico, an anti-aging biotech company
  • Sidewalk, a company focused on smart cities
  • Nest, a maker of Internet-connected devices for the home
  • Fiber, high-speed Internet service in a number of American cities
  • Investment arms, such as Google Ventures and Google Capital
  • Incubator projects, such as Google X, which is developing self-driving cars and delivery drones

Such disputes are a big reason Mr. Page had been shedding managerial duties and delegating the bulk of his product oversight to Mr. Pichai, these people said. In a 2014 memo to the company announcing Mr. Pichai’s promotion to product chief, Mr. Page said the move would allow him to “focus on the bigger picture” at Google and have more time to get the company’s next generation of big bets off the ground.

People who have worked with Mr. Page say that he tries to guard his calendar, avoiding back-to-back meetings and leaving time to read, research and see new technologies that interest him.

Given that he is worth in the neighborhood of $40 billion and created the world’s most famous website, Mr. Page has the tendency to attract a crowd when he attends technology events. At last year’s Darpa Robotics Challenge, he was trailed closely by a handler who at times acted as a buffer between Mr. Page and would-be cellphone photographers. That commotion could annoy anyone, but it is particularly troubling for Mr. Page, who, because of damaged vocal cords, speaks just above a whisper and sometimes uses a microphone in small meetings.

At home in Palo Alto, Mr. Page tries to have the most normal life possible, driving his children to school or taking his family to local street fairs, according to people who know him or have seen him at such events.

And at Google, even events that are decidedly not normal aspire to a kind of casualness. Take the Camp, an exclusive and secretive event that Google holds at a resort in Sicily and where invitees have included Elon Musk, the chief executive of Tesla Motors and SpaceX, Lloyd C. Blankfein, the chief executive of Goldman Sachs, and Tory Burch, the fashion designer.

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A Project Loon balloon. Credit Google

One attendee, who asked to remain anonymous because guests were not supposed to discuss the gathering, recalls being surprised by how much time Mr. Page spent with his children.

In public remarks, Mr. Page has said how important his father, Carl V. Page, a computer science professor at Michigan State University who died in 1996, was to his choice of career.

“My dad was really interested in technology,” Mr. Page said at Google I/O in 2013, the last time he took the stage at the event. “He actually drove me and my family all the way across the country to go to a robotics conference. And then we got there and he thought it was so important that his young son go to the conference, one of the few times I’ve seen him really argue with someone to get in someone underage successfully into the conference, and that was me.”

People who work with Mr. Page or have spoken with him at conferences say he tries his best to blend in, and, for the most part, the smaller groups of handpicked attendees at Google’s academic and science gatherings, tend to treat him like a peer.

The scope of his curiosity was apparent at Sci Foo Camp, an annual invitation-only conference that is sponsored by Google, O’Reilly Media and Digital Science.

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A Nest thermostat.

The largely unstructured “unconference” begins when each of its attendees — an eclectic batch of astronomers, psychologists, physicists and others — write something that interests them on a small card and then paste it to a communal wall. Those notes become the basis for breakout talks on topics like scientific ethics or artificial intelligence.

The last conference was held during a weekend in June on Google’s Mountain View, Calif., campus, and Mr. Page was there for most of it. He did not host or give a speech, but mingled and went to talks, just like everyone else. That impressed investors and computer scientists who did not expect to see so much of him, but researchers who had come from outside Silicon Valley barely noticed.

“I have a vague memory that some founder type person was walking through the crowd,” said Josh Peek, an assistant astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore.

Another benefit of these gatherings for the reserved Mr. Page is that they are mostly closed to the news media.

A Forward Thinker

When Mr. Page does talk in public, he tends to focus on optimistic pronouncements about the future and Google’s desire to help humanity. Asked about current issues, like how mobile apps are challenging the web or how ad blockers are affecting Google’s business, he tends to dismiss it with something like, “People have been talking about that for a long time.”

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A contact lens with a wireless chip. Credit Google

Lately, he has talked more about his belief that for-profit companies can be a force for social good and change. During a 2014 interview with Charlie Rose, Mr. Page said that instead of a nonprofit or philanthropic organization, he would rather leave his money to an entrepreneur like Mr. Musk.

Larry Page: Where's Google going next? Video by TED

Of course, for every statement Mr. Page makes about Alphabet’s technocorporate benevolence, you can find many competitors and privacy advocates holding their noses in disgust. Technology companies like Yelp have accused the company of acting like a brutal monopolist that is using the dominance of its search engine to steer consumers toward Google services, even if that means giving the customers inferior information.

Financially speaking, Mr. Page is leaving his chief executive job at Google at a time when things could not be better. The company’s revenue continues to grow about 20 percent a year, an impressive figure for any business, but particularly so for one that is on pace to generate approximately $60 billion this year.

In fact, the company’s main business issue seems to be that it is doing too well. Google is facing antitrust charges in Europe, along with investigations in Europe and the United States. Those issues are now mostly Mr. Pichai’s to worry about, as Mr. Page is out looking for the next big thing.

It is hard to imagine how even the most ambitious person could hope to revolutionize so many industries. And Mr. Page, no matter how smart, cannot possibly be an expert in every area Alphabet wants to touch.

His method is not overly technical. Instead, he tends to focus on how to make a sizable business out of whatever problem this or that technology might solve. Leslie Dewan, a nuclear engineer who founded a company that is trying to generate cheap electricity from nuclear waste, also had a brief conversation with Mr. Page at the Solve For X conference.

She said he questioned her on things like modular manufacturing and how to find the right employees.

“He doesn’t have a nuclear background, but he knew the right questions to ask,” said Dr. Dewan, chief executive of Transatomic Power. “‘Have you thought about approaching the manufacturing in this way?’ ‘Have you thought about the vertical integration of the company in this way?’ ‘Have you thought about training the work force this way?’ They weren’t nuclear physics questions, but they were extremely thoughtful ways to think about how we could structure the business.”

Dr. Dewan said Mr. Page even gave her an idea for a new market opportunity that she had not thought of. Asked to be more specific, she refused. The idea was too good to share.

Doris Burke contributed reporting from New York.

Trying to interview Google’s chief executive can feel ... emasculating. Conor Dougherty provides a look in Times Insider at how he covers the company and its elusive chief, Larry Page.

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So...does Google steal much of it's technology?

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Kinda' looks like it. Google's attorney ran the patent office while Google controlled the White House in the Obama Administration and Google spent the largest amount of money in history to try to force laws into being to outlaw indiependent American inventors.

 

 

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MANAGEMENT: BAY TO BREAKERS "FOOTSTOCK" MULTI-YEAR MANAGEMENT PROJECT

As Producer Scott delivered an instant temporary city for 200,000+ people, year-after-year...

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Bay To Breakers “Footstock” Production

We created the first 200,000+ person post-race sports-city and ran logistics for that event for the “World’s Largest Sports Event, The Bay To Breakers.” as Producer; contracted for design, development and construction of a 1,200,000 square foot temporary “City”, with all of the functions required to keep people safe and functional, for hundreds of thousands of people.

     http://www.vimeo.com/125390567

 
GALLERY OF PROJECT IMAGES:
 

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TELECOM: American Innovator Scott Douglas Redmond Receives Key U.S. Federal Government Engineering Validation

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American Innovator Scott Douglas Redmond Receives Key U.S. Federal Government Engineering Validation

By Andrew Cohen New York -

When you want to move high quality movies, large X-Ray files and big data sets over the internet you need to break those files up into something the internet can handle. Imagine trying to shove a single 15,000 pound elephant through your front door! It isn’t going to work very well. Let’s say that the elephant represents a high definition movie. You could push and shove and bend the elephant to try to jam him through your door. You might have to break the elephant in the process. This will be bad for both you and the elephant. Now let’s say you had 15,000 pounds worth of kittens that also represented that exact same movie. All you would need to do is open your door, put some catnip on the other side of the door and watch the kitties pour through the door like liquid mercury. That is how Bittorrent, Akamai, Kontiki and all of world’s high quality peer-to-peer mesh media distribution works; with the kittens and not the elephant. That is what Redmond invented and the federal government has now issued a large number of patent awards to Redmond to confirm it. Peer-to-peer mesh media distribution is the version with the kittens and the catnip.

It saves billions of dollars, eliminates the buffering stalls and lags, and gives you your media in the highest possible quality. Redmond’s technology also has advanced versions which are “the most anti-theft media files around.” The United States Government was challenged with investigating the claim over who first designed, engineered, documented, launched and first sold peer-to-peer mesh networked media distribution. Brahm Cohen of Bittorrent and Scott have had an ongoing bet about who was first. Scott Douglas Redmond won the bet! The government, the document records and the NDAs proved that Redmond was up and running years before Bittorrent. In one of Redmond’s deployments known as CLICKMOVIE, which was the first Netflix or Youtube-type online video storefront (before either of those companies even existed), Redmond was already delivering all of the functionality of YouTube years before YouTube was even formed.

Now Redmond is offering his technology to the world and helping disaster-relief and democracy programs with information and communication resources globally. Redmond created the first Democracy emergency services App, launched with the help of Steve Jobs and the Apple App store, for the Japanese Tsunami and later, for global refugee regions. Working with Sony Pictures’ most senior level executives, Redmond developed Sony Pictures MovieLink and Sony Vue online video distribution system. Redmond’s team is the only outside entity mentioned in extensive references in Sony’s own federal government patent filings. Redmond is strongly opposed to the use of his technology for piracy. He says that he built the technology for “efficiency and infrastructure cost savings and not for copyright violators...” In line with Peter Thiel’s “payback-is-a-bitch” efforts, Redmond has also been assisting with tabloid publication ethics efforts and counter-measures. When I asked Scott Douglas Redmond what he attributes his career of top problem solving inventions to, he says that “Luck is when preparation meets with opportunity. Observe the world around you and society will always tell you what it needs next. Then build the thing that will solve a problem for the most people.”

Redmond has been awarded dozens of U.S. federal patents on products in use by millions of people around the globe. He has sold companies and technologies to top investment groups ranging from global developers to Microsoft staff to federal agencies. What is Redmond working on next? With a wink, he replies “Something big…!”

 

 

Tags: Scott Redmond, Scott Douglas Redmond, Brahm Cohen, Sony Pictures, Bittorrent, Akamai, Kontiki, Microsoft, Peter Thiel, Movielink, Sony Vue, Sony Morpheus, ClickMovie, clickmovie.com, dropbox, qualcomm, Flashlinq, Peer-to-peer, Mesh networks, P2P Mesh, Democri-C

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TELECOM: Peer-To-Peer Mesh Network Technologies

The network technology that self-heals, saves billions and works anywhere on Earth

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PEER-TO-PEER Network Technologies By Scott

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: A variety of projects which deploy collaborative device connection to support communications in challenged regions and disaster situations. Our teams have built, patented, deployed and delivered some of the first, and leading, peer to peer technology in the world. Some of our team technology has saved many, many lives. PHYSICS: Any device that can see an electromagnetic signal can often also send an electromagnetic signal. Many devices, today, can send and receive many types of electromagnetic signals, on the same device, some concurrently. This approach turns each device (ie: your smartphone or gamebox)  into its own broadcasting, reception and relay station. This technology needs no servers, towers or infrastructure to operate. Signals can range from audio, radio, light, IR, UV, vibration, laser, reflection, GPS interrupts, induction,  and other modifications of the I/O capabilities of the device. USES:  To support communications in challenged regions and disaster situations

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http://www.vimeo.com/125658259

http://www.vimeo.com/125390652

http://www.vimeo.com/125390151

http://www.vimeo.com/125390152

http://www.vimeo.com/126023660

Related Past Projects:

Our team developed, engineered, produced, patented and marketed the software suite that has become one of the leading solutions sets in the intelligence, defense and emergency services arenas globally with over $300 Million invested in it’s production and deployment. One of the packages was distributed by Apple Computer with marketing personally accelerated by Steve Jobs in support of the Tsunami disaster. Other versions of the software have been used in refugee zones globally. When an illegal copycat version of our software failed in one region (Putting lives at risk), our authorized version kept on working. Our architecture has been proven to be unstoppable – against all odds. The full version STILL has yet to be hacked, in the field, by any known technology. It is STILL the least network- congestive, lowest-cost infrastructure, most ultra-secure, network solution in the world! A copy of the Movie: BIRTH OF A NATION was placed in the network flow out on the open web, using the technology, with a phrase imprinted across the center of the image. A $250,000.00 reward was offered to anyone who could provide a fully reassembled copy of the film with the imprinted image and certification headers intact. To this day: Nobody has been able to acquire that film sample off of the web, and reassemble it; proving the strength of the technology.
 

EMERGENCY REFUGEE COMMUNICATIONS FOR DISASTERS AND WAR-ZONES:

The CIA's associated group: IN-Q-TEL, invited us to show our technology to them and then delivered it, via their sister organization: New America Foundation, under the names Serval, Commotion, and other identifiers. Federal accounting agencies report that over $200M has been spent, to date, via State Department budgets, to deliver the system globally. Peer-to-peer data relaying is now the #1 software solution for troubled regions and disaster zones. 

Scott’s Original “Internet in a Suitcase” - Multiple U.S. Patents issued as "First-To-Invent"

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When inferior copy-cat versions failed, costing lives, our original version kept on working.

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Using the technology, only 3 people's cell phones can cover San Francisco from ocean-to-bay, without the need for any servers.

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FIRECHAT and other P2P Emergency Communications Systems Are Changing The World:


GET IT ON IOS STORES and at  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.opengarden.firechat

The internet-free messaging app that’s sweeping the world

Apps use P2P combination of Bluetooth and WiFi

We already have Whatsapp, Facebook messenger, Snapchat etc, what makes FireChat different?
You can chat “off the grid”, even if there is no internet connection or mobile phone coverage. How is that possible? Instead of relying on a central server, it is based on peer-to-peer “mesh networking” and connects to nearby phones using Bluetooth and WiFi, with connectivity increasing as more people use it in an area. Firechat lets you talk anonymously Where might this be useful? According to FireChat, “on the beach or in the subway, at a big game or a trade show, camping in the wild or at a concert, or even travelling abroad, simply fire up the app with a friend or two and find out who else is there.” Seriously though. In Hong Kong mostly, where pro-democracy protesters are using it to communicate amid fears of network shutdowns. It’s also been used by Iraqis and Taiwanese students during their anti-Beijing Sunflower Movement. Aside from not being reliant on the internet (which some governments restrict), it is more clandestine and less traceable. You can also join group conversations How popular is FireChat? Over 100,000 people downloaded it in 24 hours in Hong Kong over the weekend, with the CEO saying that numbers are “booming” and up to 33,000 people were using the app at the same time.
CNN NEWS:

– Lasers, Video Projectors, Drones, P2P, coded-hashcodes, Mass-mouthing – GEEK VS. GEEK CYBERWAR! – Lasers write messages on buildings and project animations – Pocket video projectors show digital posters and movies on sides of buildings – Protestor’s drones monitor crowd safety – Entire New INTERNET, built by Democracy Protestors, does not use any corporate back-bone infrastructure. – Complex codes on Twitter and in TEXT messages have hidden meanings – Blinking laser dots on buildings use MORSE CODE – Arm Signals and hand signals use visual message relay – Hong Kong protesters in cyberwar

 

By Jeff Yang
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 A pro-democracy protester holds on to a barrier as he and others defend a barricade from attacks by rival protest groups in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong on Saturday, October 4.

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 Pro-democracy student protesters pin a man to the ground after an assault during a scuffle with local residents in Mong Kok, Hong Kong on October 4. Friction persisted between pro-democracy protesters and opponents of their weeklong occupation of major Hong Kong streets, and police denied they had any connection to criminal gangs suspected of inciting attacks on largely peaceful demonstrators.

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 Pro-democracy protesters raise their arms in a sign of nonviolence as they protect a barricade from rival protest groups in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong on October 4.
 
Students in the massive protests in Hong Kong want representative democracy
  • Jeff Yang: These protesters may be the most sophisticated and technologically savvy ever
  • He says Chinese authorities are blocking images and creating apps that trick protesters
  • Yang: Smartphone a great tool for populist empowerment but it can easily be used against us

Editor’s note: Jeff Yang is a columnist for The Wall Street Journal Online and can be heard frequently on radio as a contributor to shows such as PRI’s “The Takeaway” and WNYC’s “The Brian Lehrer Show.” He is the author of “I Am Jackie Chan: My Life in Action” and editor of the graphic novel anthologies “Secret Identities” and “Shattered.” The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

(CNN) — The massive protests in Hong Kong took an ugly turn on Friday when students pressing for representative democracy clashed with opponents, prompting a breakdown of talks aimed at defusing the crisis.

This negativity followed a week of remarkably peaceful civil disobedience in what has been dubbed the “Umbrella Revolution,” after the widely shared image of a man defiantly holding up an umbrella in a haze of police tear gas fired to disperse the tens of thousands of activists crowding the city’s main government and business thoroughfare, the region referred to as Central.

But protesters shrugged off the gas assault as if it had never happened. Behind the barricades, they studied for exams, coordinated the cleanup and recycling of trash generated by the crowd, and jerry-rigged guerrilla charging stations for the voluminous array of devices the demonstrators are using as part of the sophisticated war they’re waging on the virtual front, wielding the digital-age weapons of image feeds, live streaming video and ceaseless social media updates.

 
 
Jeff Yang

The Umbrella Revolution is hardly the first protest to harness the power of technology to coordinate activities and broadcast messages, but it’s almost certainly the most sophisticated.

Andrew Lih, a journalism professor at American University, discussed the infrastructure the activists have adopted in an article for Quartz, a system that incorporates fast wireless broadband, multimedia smartphones, aerial drones and mobile video projectors, cobbled together by pro-democracy geektivists like the ad-hoc hacker coalition Code4HK.

Given this remarkable show of force by the crowd under the Umbrella, it’s not surprising that Beijing has moved quickly to prevent transmissions from reaching the mainland, blocking Chinese access to Instagram, where images and videos from the demonstrations and police crackdowns are regularly being posted, and banning all posts on popular messaging sites like Weibo and WeChat carrying keywords that refer to the protests.

Activists have fought back by downloading the peer-to-peer “mesh messaging” app FireChat — which allows communication among nearby users even when centralized mobile services are unavailable by linking smartphones directly to one another via Bluetooth and wifi — in the hundreds of thousands, and by creating an elaborate system of numerical hashtags to stand in for forbidden terms.

For example, #689 is the codename for Hong Kong chief executive C.Y. Leung, referring to the number of votes he received in his selection as the region’s highest government representative, a scant majority of the 1,200 members of the the Communist Party-approved nominating committee. #8964 references Beijing’s brutal June 4, 1989, crackdown on student democracy activists in Tiananmen Square, which casts a looming shadow over the Occupy Central demonstrations.

These strategies seem to have prompted the Chinese authorities to resort to new and more insidious tactics. Links — seemingly posted by Code4HK — have begun popping up on social media, inviting users to download a new app that allows for secure coordination of protest activities.

Instead, clicking the link downloads a Trojan horse that gives its developers — presumed by some security experts to be “red hat’ hackers working with support from the Chinese government — open access to the messages, calls, contacts, location and even the bank information and passwords of those naive enough to download it.

That’s a harsh lesson not just for those living under authoritarian regimes, but for us citizens of nominally free and democratic societies as well.

The smartphone is by far the most formidable tool for populist empowerment ever invented, turning individual human beings into mobile broadcast platforms and decentralized mobs into self-organizing bodies. But it’s also jarringly easy for these devices to be used against us.

Here in the United States, revelations of the existence of massive government surveillance programs like the NSA’s PRISM have caused an uproar among digital libertarians. Likewise, criminal smartphone hacking and cloud cracking has led to the release of celebrity nude photos and sex videos, to the humiliation of those who thought them private.

The response from leading smartphone developers like Apple and Google has been to announce new methods of locking and encrypting information to make it harder for individuals, businesses or governments to gain access to our personal information.

But even as they add these fresh layers of security, they continue to extend the reach of these devices into our lives, with services that integrate frictionless financial transactions and home systems management into our smartphones, and wearable accessories that capture and transmit our very heartbeats.

Imagine how much control commercial exploiters, criminals — or overreaching law enforcement — might have if it gained access to all these features. The upshot is that we increasingly have to take matters into our own hands (and handsets), policing our online behavior and resisting the temptation to click on risky links.

It may be worth exploring innovative new tools that offer unblockable or truly secure alternatives to traditional communications, like the free VPN browser extension Hola, which evades global digital boundaries to Web access; open-source projects likeServal and Commotion, which are attempting to develop standards for mesh connectivity that route around the need for commercial mobile phone networks; and apps like RedPhone and Signal, which offer free, worldwide end-to-end encrypted voice conversations.

Most of these are works in progress. But as technology becomes ever more deeply embedded into our lifestyles, keeping our digital identities secure and private is becoming increasingly critical. And as the protests in Hong Kong have shown, the only solution may be to use technology to defend against technology — in other words, to fight fire with FireChat.

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EXAMPLES OF TECHNOLOGY:

 

HTTP://p2p-Internet.weebly.com

 

IEEE Communications Magazine Publishes InterDigital Paper on P2P Communications

written by sstocker
 
InterDigital’s M2M team was recently published in the prestigious IEEE Communications Magazine with their article, “CA-P2P: Context-Aware Proximity-Based Peer-to-Peer Wireless Communications.” The work was co-authored by Chonggang Wang, Qing Li, Hongkun Li, Paul Russell, Jr. and Zhuo Chen, all engineers at InterDigital. The authors argue that CA-P2P may be a viable solution to both existing and new proximity-based services, including commercial applications such as advertising as well as emergency/disaster relief, when centralized networks may become unavailable.  Taking various levels of context into account during the P2P connection results in quick, efficient peer discovery and peer association. This will become increasingly important in the emerging fifth generation, with growing numbers of small cell and D2D communications becoming common. The paper delves into the benefits and challenges of CA-P2P and offers performance evaluations of simulations as evidence. Interested in learning even more? Visit our Vault, where you can search keywords such as peer-to-peer, device-to-device, D2D and IoT to find additional resources.

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MANAGEMENT: LOGISTICS DIRECTION FOR LARGE PUBLIC PROGRAMS

We do BIG!

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Our teams have been engaged to produce and/or manage million square foot+ venues with hundreds of thousands of people. We layout the operation, stage the logistics, source all suppliers and infrastructure, run the operations, keep everyone safe and then disappear these entire "temporary cities" as if they were never there.

Here are a few samples of  past work for the community, organizations and sponsors: 

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San Francisco Blues Festival Logistics

We ran logistics for the San Francisco Blues Festival working with the Founder: Tom Mazzolini and the Co-Sponsors: The National Park Service.

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The San Francisco Blues Festival broke the record as the longest continuously operated American music festival in national Park service history.

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http://www.vimeo.com/125657421

...To the top major events centre in the Bay Area with record-setting crowds and novel presentations, with production and operations by Scott, working for both The National Park Service and Fort Mason Center:

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Production Sets and Decorations for Mimi Farina for Bread and Roses -

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Production Lead for THE GREAT GAMING HOUSE. One hundred theaters in the same building for an interactive walk-through venue about the game of life. Created by the founder or arena theater in America; author Kelly Yeaton.-

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Producer and designer of the promotional program for the San Francisco Symphony called: AMERICAN CLOUD -

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Scott was the Creative Director for Showplace Square and assisted with tenant relations and produced the annual music spectacular -

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For the Opening of Ramada's top hotel, Our crew were tasked with rappelling the building to install the world's largest ribbon and bow -

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PUT THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY OUT ON A PIER? NO PROBLEM:

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MEDIA: VIRTUAL REALITY AND ENHANCED REALITY PROJECTS

Inventors of some of VR's first big hits!

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Virtual Reality & Simulation/Visualization Technologies

Our team is known as “The Father’s of VR”. They built, and received U.S. Government patent awards on, the first immersive VR and augmented digital reality systems. Some of those systems were very expensive, as high as $2.5M at the time. Now you buy them in retail stores for under $600.
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MORE PROJECT TRACK RECORD VIDEO: Our patented ShapeWALL Tactile VR Surface Modules, Pods, Mobile devices and Modeling surfaces. From “Crazy Idea” to functional tool:

Our super-low cost VR googles:

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 If you can use tape, scissors, glue and pliers; you can, most likely, build some of these systems yourself. You already have the main part of the electronics by using your phone, tablet, computer or gamebox. You don’t even have to tear any electronics apart. You can make what you already have do dual purpose. As shown in this image, and in the time-stamps on our patent filings and issuance’s, we developed one of the first, if not the first, uses of a smartphone as the head-mounted display and position-sensor unit:   Discussion Of Parts Suppliers: Get a new back mount or get new lenses and swap them out when you need to. It is designed for hot swap lenses. Ideal lenses are the stacked Fresnel flat stamp 70-120 degree or the Erfle 65 degree lens, or the Plano Convex 92/95 degree lens. These lenses, or lens sets, can be purchased from various suppliers online for less than $30.00. You can hot dip the whole mount in truck bed coating or black electrical tape-it for various amounts of blackout/immersion of the unit. (A famous game company spent millions on legal research to determine that due to past litigation from users of other gaming VR headsets from other companies, not ours, one cannot legally sell you a fully blacked-out headset mount.) You choose your safest blackout/immersion level based on your use and safety parameters.


Past VR Work & Products Include:

The U.S. Government, after extensive investigation, awarded us multiple seminal patents as sole inventor of immersive virtual reality chambers, now known as “The Cave” or “The Holodeck”. This technology is used in the highest end tactical mission simulators and defense training systems:  We has consulted on Virtual Reality, Networked Simulation and wearable visualization technologies for a number of government and corporate clients. Here is an E! Entertainment Network segment about Scott’s work with the Production of Oliver Stone’s“Wild Palms”:

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http://www.vimeo.com/125658258

CLICK EACH THUMBNAIL TO ENLARGE:

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TELECOM: LIGHT-CASTING EVEN WORKS IN OUTER SPACE

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Inquire about acquiring the issued mobile device patents on this technology

SCOTT'S PATENTED LIGHT-CASTING(TM) EVEN WORKS IN OUTER SPACE

THE INTERNET: POWERED BY LIGHT!

In 1977, a group of technicians and engineers in San Francisco, California went up on top of a mountain in the middle of San Francisco, named Twin Peaks, and broadcast the internet across all of San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley in Northern California. They did not use wires or radio waves. They used light.

Entrepreneur and technologist Scott Douglas Redmond ( http://www.scottdouglasredmond.com/ ) , and his team of brilliant engineers rigged up a system on the mountain designed to save time and money, but they soon discovered other advantages. The city of San Francisco gave him the mountain for nearly a week, during which he received a mayoral proclamation and the donation of an entire radio station and the main laser used in Star Wars for special effects.

What happens when you give a legion of engineers a whole mountain in the middle of San Francisco?