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How My Science Teams Can See Everything: The Laser Raman Spectroscopic Study Device

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How My Science Teams Can See Everything: The Laser Raman Spectroscopic Study Device

Want to know about every toxin in your home, food or air? Want to see what is in that beverage you are about to drink? You can look at any object and know what it is and what it is made of with our E-Glasses interface. You can tune your life like you tune your music. You can dial-out certain substances and dial-in others. Our trade secret and patent-pending protected technology is the i-Pod of personal science. While large systems in this field exist, there is nothing out there for "regular folks". As they say: "If you can't buy it at Walgreens or Rite Aid, who cares?..." The technology is 100% functional right now. Factory DFM and volume price-point reduction is the final challenge.

A new gadget we are working on will let you put a device in your pocket that can tell you about every substance you put inside your body. It uses solid state lasers and other interesting things. What is the science behind part of it? Let’s take a look:

Micro-Laser Raman Spectroscopy is a spectroscopic analysis technique used to observe vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes in a system.[1] Raman spectroscopy is commonly used in chemistry to provide a visual structure fingerprint by which molecules, and that which they make up, can be identified. It can see the particles that make up that which is around you by identifying their molucular components.

It relies on inelastic scattering, or Raman scattering, of monochromatic light, usually from a laser in the visible, near infrared, or near ultraviolet range. The laser light interacts with molecular vibrations, phonons, or other excitations in the system, resulting in the energy of the laser photons being shifted up or down. The shift in energy gives information about the vibrational modes in the system. Infrared spectroscopy yields similar, but complementary, information.

Typically, a sample is illuminated with a laser beam. Electromagnetic radiation from the illuminated spot is collected with a lens and sent through a monochromator. Elastic scattered radiation at the wavelength corresponding to the laser line (Rayleigh scattering) is filtered out by either a notch filter, edge pass filter, or a band pass filter, while the rest of the collected light is dispersed onto a detector.

Spontaneous Raman scattering is typically very weak, and as a result the main difficulty of Raman spectroscopy is separating the weak inelastically scattered light from the intense Rayleigh scattered laser light. Historically, Raman spectrometers used holographic gratings and multiple dispersion stages to achieve a high degree of laser rejection. In the past, photomultipliers were the detectors of choice for dispersive Raman setups, which resulted in long acquisition times. However, modern instrumentation almost universally employs notch or edge filters for laser rejection and spectrographs either axial transmissive (AT), Czerny–Turner (CT) monochromator, or FT (Fourier transform spectroscopy based), and CCD detectors.

The advanced types of Raman spectroscopy include surface-enhanced Raman, resonance Raman, tip-enhanced Raman, polarized Raman, stimulated Raman (analogous to stimulated emission), transmission Raman, spatially offset Raman, and hyper Raman.

The Raman effect occurs when electromagnetic radiation interacts with a solid, liquid, or gaseous molecule’s polarizable electron density and bonds. The spontaneous effect is a form of inelastic light scattering, where a photon excites the molecule in either the ground (lowest energy) or excited rovibronic state (a rotational and vibrational energy level within an electronic state). This excitation puts the molecule into a virtual energy state for a short time before the photon scatters inelastically. Inelastic scattering means that the scattered photon can be of either lower or higher energy than the incoming photon, compared to elastic, or Rayleigh, scattering where the scattered photon has the same energy as the incoming photon. After interacting with the photon, the molecule is in a different rotational or vibrational state. This change in energy between the initial and final rovibronic states causes the scattered photon's frequency to shift away from the excitation wavelength (that of the incoming photon), called the Rayleigh line.

For the total energy of the system to remain constant after the molecule moves to a new rovibronic state, the scattered photon shifts to a different energy, and therefore a different frequency. This energy difference is equal to that between the initial and final rovibronic states of the molecule. If the final state is higher in energy than the initial state, the scattered photon will be shifted to a lower frequency (lower energy) so that the total energy remains the same. This shift in frequency is called a Stokes shift, or downshift. If the final state is lower in energy, the scattered photon will be shifted to a higher frequency, which is called an anti-Stokes shift, or upshift.

For a molecule to exhibit a Raman effect, there must be a change in its electric dipole-electric dipole polarizability with respect to the vibrational coordinate corresponding to the rovibronic state. The intensity of the Raman scattering is proportional to this polarizability change. Therefore, the Raman spectrum, scattering intensity as a function of the frequency shifts, depends on the rovibronic states of the molecule.

The Raman effect is based on the interaction between the electron cloud of a sample and the external electrical field of the monochromatic light, which can create an induced dipole moment within the molecule based on its polarizability. Because the laser light does not excite the molecule there can be no real transition between energy levels.[2] The Raman effect should not be confused with emission (fluorescence or phosphorescence), where a molecule in an excited electronic state emits a photon and returns to the ground electronic state, in many cases to a vibrationally excited state on the ground electronic state potential energy surface. Raman scattering also contrasts with infrared (IR) absorption, where the energy of the absorbed photon matches the difference in energy between the initial and final rovibronic states. The dependence of Raman on the electric dipole-electric dipole polarizability derivative also differs from IR spectroscopy, which depends on the electric dipole moment derivative, the atomic polar tensor (APT). This contrasting feature allows rovibronic transitions that might not be active in IR to be analyzed using Raman spectroscopy, as exemplified by the rule of mutual exclusion in centrosymmetric molecules. Transitions which have large Raman intensities often have weak IR intensities and vice versa. A third vibrational spectroscopy technique, inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (IINS), can be used to determine the frequencies of vibrations in highly symmetric molecules that may be both IR and Raman inactive. The IINS selection rules, or allowed transitions, differ from those of IR and Raman, so the three techniques are complementary. They all give the same frequency for a given vibrational transition, but the relative intensities provide different information due to the different types of interaction between the molecule and the incoming particles, photons for IR and Raman, and neutrons for IINS.

Although the inelastic scattering of light was predicted by Adolf Smekal in 1923,[3] it was not observed in practice until 1928. The Raman effect was named after one of its discoverers, the Indian scientist Sir C. V. Raman, who observed the effect by means of sunlight (1928, together with K. S. Krishnan and independently by Grigory Landsberg and Leonid Mandelstam).[1] Raman won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1930 for this discovery accomplished using sunlight, a narrow-band photographic filter to create monochromatic light, and a "crossed filter" to block this monochromatic light. He found that a small amount of light had changed frequency and passed through the "crossed" filter.

Systematic pioneering theory of the Raman effect was developed by Czechoslovak physicist George Placzek between 1930 and 1934.[4] The mercury arc became the principal light source, first with photographic detection and then with spectrophotometric detection.

In the years following its discovery, Raman spectroscopy was used to provide the first catalog of molecular vibrational frequencies. Originally, heroic measures were required to obtain Raman spectra due to the low sensitivity of the technique. Typically, the sample was held in a long tube and illuminated along its length with a beam of filtered monochromatic light generated by a gas discharge lamp. The photons that were scattered by the sample were collected through an optical flat at the end of the tube. To maximize the sensitivity, the sample was highly concentrated (1 M or more) and relatively large volumes (5 mL or more) were used. Consequently, the use of Raman spectroscopy dwindled when commercial IR spectrophotometers became available in the 1940s. However, the advent of the laser in the 1960s resulted in simplified Raman spectroscopy instruments and also boosted the sensitivity of the technique. This has revived the use of Raman spectroscopy as a common analytical technique.

Raman shifts are typically reported in wavenumbers, which have units of inverse length, as this value is directly related to energy. In order to convert between spectral wavelength and wavenumbers of shift in the Raman spectrum.

Raman spectroscopy is used in chemistry to identify molecules and study chemical bonding. Because vibrational frequencies are specific to a molecule’s chemical bonds and symmetry (the fingerprint region of organic molecules is in the wavenumber range 500–1500 cm−1,[5] Raman provides a fingerprint to identify molecules. For instance, Raman and IR spectra were used to determine the vibrational frequencies of SiO, Si2O2, and Si3O3 on the basis of normal coordinate analyses.[6] Raman is also used to study the addition of a substrate to an enzyme.

In solid-state physics, Raman spectroscopy is used to characterize materials, measure temperature, and find the crystallographic orientation of a sample. As with single molecules, a solid material can be identified by characteristic phonon modes. Information on the population of a phonon mode is given by the ratio of the Stokes and anti-Stokes intensity of the spontaneous Raman signal. Raman spectroscopy can also be used to observe other low frequency excitations of a solid, such as plasmons, magnons, and superconducting gap excitations. Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) uses the Raman-shifted backscatter from laser pulses to determine the temperature along optical fibers. The orientation of an anisotropic crystal can be found from the polarization of Raman-scattered light with respect to the crystal and the polarization of the laser light, if the crystal structure’s point group is known.

In nanotechnology, a Raman microscope can be used to analyze nanowires to better understand their structures, and the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes is commonly used to evaluate their diameter.

Raman active fibers, such as aramid and carbon, have vibrational modes that show a shift in Raman frequency with applied stress. Polypropylene fibers exhibit similar shifts.

In solid state chemistry and the bio-pharmaceutical industry, Raman spectroscopy can be used to not only identify active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), but to identify their polymorphic forms, if more than one exist. For example, the drug Cayston (aztreonam), marketed by Gilead Sciences for cystic fibrosis,[7] can be identified and characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopy. Using the correct polymorphic form in bio-pharmaceutical formulations is critical, since different forms have different physical properties, like solubility and melting point.

Raman spectroscopy has a wide variety of applications in biology and medicine. It has helped confirm the existence of low-frequency phonons[8] in proteins and DNA,[9][10][11][12] promoting studies of low-frequency collective motion in proteins and DNA and their biological functions.[13][14] Raman reporter molecules with olefin or alkyne moieties are being developed for tissue imaging with SERS-labeled antibodies.[15] Raman spectroscopy has also been used as a noninvasive technique for real-time, in situ biochemical characterization of wounds. Multivariate analysis of Raman spectra has enabled development of a quantitative measure for wound healing progress.[16] Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), which is less sensitive to surface layers than conventional Raman, can be used to discover counterfeit drugs without opening their packaging, and to non-invasively study biological tissue.[17] A huge reason why Raman spectroscopy is so useful in biological applications is because its results often do not face interference from water molecules, due to the fact that they have permanent dipole moments, and as a result, the Raman scattering cannot be picked up on. This is a large advantage, specifically in biological applications.[18] Raman spectroscopy also has a wide usage for studying biominerals.[19] Lastly, Raman gas analyzers have many practical applications, including real-time monitoring of anesthetic and respiratory gas mixtures during surgery.

Raman spectroscopy is an efficient and non-destructive way to investigate works of art.[20] Identifying individual pigments in paintings and their degradation products provides insight into the working method of the artist. It also gives information about the original state of the painting in cases where the pigments degraded with age.[21] In addition to paintings, Raman spectroscopy can be used to investigate the chemical composition of historical documents (such as the Book of Kells), which can provide insight about the social and economic conditions when they were created.[22] It also offers a noninvasive way to determine the best method of preservation or conservation of such materials.

Raman spectroscopy has been used in several research projects as a means to detect explosives from a safe distance using laser beams.[23][24][25] Airports and transit areas in NY City and Paris now use laser explosive detection.

Raman Spectroscopy is being further developed so it could be used in the clinical setting. Raman4Clinic is a European organization that is working on incorporating Raman Spectroscopy techniques in the medical field. They are currently working on different projects, one of them being monitoring cancer using bodily fluids such as urine and blood samples which are easily accessible. This technique would be less stressful on the patients than constantly having to take biopsies which are not always risk free.[26]

Handheld spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) has just been developed for a novel application to food security, in this case counterfeiting/food fraud. The first time such a handheld device has been used in a food or beverage product, it was able to detect multiple chemical markers of counterfeit alcohol in extremely low concentrations. This included six denaturants and four additives commonly used by counterfeiters worldwide. This was achievable directly through the bottle without any contact with the sample and through multiple colours of commercial bottles of a variety of spirit drinks.[27]

 

 

Comparison of topographical (AFM, top) and Raman images of GaSe. Scale bar is 5 μm.[28]

Raman spectroscopy offers several advantages for microscopic analysis. Since it is a scattering technique, specimens do not need to be fixed or sectioned. Raman spectra can be collected from a very small volume (< 1 µm in diameter); these spectra allow the identification of species present in that volume. Water does not generally interfere with Raman spectral analysis. Thus, Raman spectroscopy is suitable for the microscopic examination of minerals, materials such as polymers and ceramics, cells, proteins and forensic trace evidence. A Raman microscope begins with a standard optical microscope, and adds an excitation laser, a monochromator, and a sensitive detector (such as a charge-coupled device (CCD), or photomultiplier tube (PMT)). FT-Raman has also been used with microscopes. Ultraviolet microscopes and UV enhanced optics must be used when a UV laser source is used for Raman microspectroscopy.

In direct imaging, the whole field of view is examined for scattering over a small range of wavenumbers (Raman shifts). For instance, a wavenumber characteristic for cholesterol could be used to record the distribution of cholesterol within a cell culture.

The other approach is hyperspectral imaging or chemical imaging, in which thousands of Raman spectra are acquired from all over the field of view. The data can then be used to generate images showing the location and amount of different components. Taking the cell culture example, a hyperspectral image could show the distribution of cholesterol, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, and fatty acids. Sophisticated signal- and image-processing techniques can be used to ignore the presence of water, culture media, buffers, and other interference.

Raman microscopy, and in particular confocal microscopy, has very high spatial resolution. For example, the lateral and depth resolutions were 250 nm and 1.7 µm, respectively, using a confocal Raman microspectrometer with the 632.8 nm line from a helium–neon laser with a pinhole of 100 µm diameter. Since the objective lenses of microscopes focus the laser beam to several micrometres in diameter, the resulting photon flux is much higher than achieved in conventional Raman setups. This has the added benefit of enhanced fluorescence quenching. However, the high photon flux can also cause sample degradation, and for this reason some setups require a thermally conducting substrate (which acts as a heat sink) in order to mitigate this process. Another approach called global Raman imaging[29] uses complete monochromatic images instead of reconstruction of images from acquired spectra. This technique is being used for the characterization of large scale devices, mapping of different compounds and dynamics study. It has already been use for the characterization of graphene layers,[30] J-aggregated dyes inside carbon nanotubes[31] and multiple other 2D materials such as MoS2 and WSe2. Since the excitation beam is dispersed over the whole field of view, those measurements can be done without damaging the sample.

By using Raman microspectroscopy, in vivo time- and space-resolved Raman spectra of microscopic regions of samples can be measured. As a result, the fluorescence of water, media, and buffers can be removed. Consequently, in vivo time- and space-resolved Raman spectroscopy is suitable to examine proteins, cells and organs.

Raman microscopy for biological and medical specimens generally uses near-infrared (NIR) lasers (785 nm diodes and 1064 nm Nd:YAG are especially common). The use of these lower energy wavelengths reduces the risk of damaging the specimen. However, the intensity of NIR Raman is low (owing to the ω4 dependence of Raman scattering intensity), and most detectors require very long collection times. Recently advances were made which had no destructive effect on mitochondria in the observation of changes in cytochrome c structure that occur in the process of electron transport and ATP synthesis.[32]

Sensitive detectors have become available, making the technique better suited to general use. Raman microscopy of inorganic specimens, such as rocks and ceramics and polymers, can use a broader range of excitation wavelengths.[33]

The polarization of the Raman scattered light also contains useful information. This property can be measured using (plane) polarized laser excitation and a polarization analyzer. Spectra acquired with the analyzer set at both perpendicular and parallel to the excitation plane can be used to calculate the depolarization ratio. Study of the technique is useful in teaching the connections between group theory, symmetry, Raman activity, and peaks in the corresponding Raman spectra.[34] Polarized light only gives access to some of the Raman active modes. By rotating the polarization you can gain access to the other modes. Each mode is separated according to its symmetry.[35]

The spectral information arising from this analysis gives insight into molecular orientation and vibrational symmetry. In essence, it allows the user to obtain valuable information relating to the molecular shape, for example in synthetic chemistry or polymorph analysis. It is often used to understand macromolecular orientation in crystal lattices, liquid crystals or polymer samples.[36]

It is convenient in polarised Raman spectroscopy to describe the propagation and polarisation directions using Porto's notation,[37] described by and named after Brazilian physicist Sergio Pereira da Silva Porto.

Variants

Several variations of Raman spectroscopy have been developed. The usual purpose is to enhance the sensitivity (e.g., surface-enhanced Raman), to improve the spatial resolution (Raman microscopy), or to acquire very specific information (resonance Raman).

  • Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy – Term used to describe Raman spectroscopy without enhancement of sensitivity.

  • Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) – Normally done in a silver or gold colloid or a substrate containing silver or gold. Surface plasmons of silver and gold are excited by the laser, resulting in an increase in the electric fields surrounding the metal. Given that Raman intensities are proportional to the electric field, there is large increase in the measured signal (by up to 1011). This effect was originally observed by Martin Fleischmann but the prevailing explanation was proposed by Van Duyne in 1977.[38] A comprehensive theory of the effect was given by Lombardi and Birke.[39]

  • Resonance Raman spectroscopy – The excitation wavelength is matched to an electronic transition of the molecule or crystal, so that vibrational modes associated with the excited electronic state are greatly enhanced. This is useful for studying large molecules such as polypeptides, which might show hundreds of bands in "conventional" Raman spectra. It is also useful for associating normal modes with their observed frequency shifts.[40]

  • Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) – A combination of SERS and resonance Raman spectroscopy that uses proximity to a surface to increase Raman intensity, and excitation wavelength matched to the maximum absorbance of the molecule being analysed.

  • Angle-resolved Raman spectroscopy – Not only are standard Raman results recorded but also the angle with respect to the incident laser. If the orientation of the sample is known then detailed information about the phonon dispersion relation can also be gleaned from a single test.[41]

  • Hyper Raman – A non-linear effect in which the vibrational modes interact with the second harmonic of the excitation beam. This requires very high power, but allows the observation of vibrational modes that are normally "silent". It frequently relies on SERS-type enhancement to boost the sensitivity.[42]

  • Optical tweezers Raman spectroscopy (OTRS) – Used to study individual particles, and even biochemical processes in single cells trapped by optical tweezers.

  • Stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) – A pump-probe technique, where a spatially coincident, two color pulse (with polarization either parallel or perpendicular) transfers the population from ground to a rovibrationally excited state. If the difference in energy corresponds to an allowed Raman transition, scattered light will correspond to loss or gain in the pump beam.

  • Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) – The Raman scattering beneath an obscuring surface is retrieved from a scaled subtraction of two spectra taken at two spatially offset points

  • Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) – Two laser beams are used to generate a coherent anti-Stokes frequency beam, which can be enhanced by resonance.

  • Raman optical activity (ROA) – Measures vibrational optical activity by means of a small difference in the intensity of Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized incident light or, equivalently, a small circularly polarized component in the scattered light.[43]

  • Transmission Raman – Allows probing of a significant bulk of a turbid material, such as powders, capsules, living tissue, etc. It was largely ignored following investigations in the late 1960s (Schrader and Bergmann, 1967)[44] but was rediscovered in 2006 as a means of rapid assay of pharmaceutical dosage forms.[45] There are medical diagnostic applications particularly in the detection of cancer.[25][46][47]

  • Inverse Raman spectroscopy.

  • Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) – Uses a metallic (usually silver-/gold-coated AFM or STM) tip to enhance the Raman signals of molecules situated in its vicinity. The spatial resolution is approximately the size of the tip apex (20–30 nm). TERS has been shown to have sensitivity down to the single molecule level and holds some promise for bioanalysis applications.[48]

  • Surface plasmon polariton enhanced Raman scattering (SPPERS) – This approach exploits apertureless metallic conical tips for near field excitation of molecules. This technique differs from the TERS approach due to its inherent capability of suppressing the background field. In fact, when an appropriate laser source impinges on the base of the cone, a TM0 mode[49] (polaritonic mode) can be locally created, namely far away from the excitation spot (apex of the tip). The mode can propagate along the tip without producing any radiation field up to the tip apex where it interacts with the molecule. In this way, the focal plane is separated from the excitation plane by a distance given by the tip length, and no background plays any role in the Raman excitation of the molecule.[50][51][52][53]

  • Micro-cavity substrates – A method that improves the detection limit of conventional Raman spectra using micro-Raman in a micro-cavity coated with reflective Au or Ag. The micro-cavity has a radius of several micrometers and enhances the entire Raman signal by providing multiple excitations of the sample and couples the forward-scattered Raman photons toward the collection optics in the back-scattered Raman geometry.[54]

  • Stand-off remote Raman. In standoff Raman, the sample is measured at a distance from the Raman spectrometer, usually by using a telescope for light collection. Remote Raman spectroscopy was proposed in the 1960s[55] and initially developed for the measurement of atmospheric gases.[56] The technique was extended In 1992 by Angel et al. for standoff Raman detection of hazardous inorganic and organic compounds.[57] Standoff Raman detection offers a fast-Raman mode of analyzing large areas such as a football field in minutes. A pulsed laser source and gated detector allow Raman spectra measurements in the daylight[58] and reduces the long-lived fluorescent background generated by transition ions and rare earth ions. Another way to avoid fluorescence, first demonstrated by Sandy Asher in 1984, is to use a UV laser probe beam. At wavelengths of 260 nm, there is effectively no fluorescence interference and the UV signal is inherently strong.[25][59][60] A 10X beam expander mounted in front of the laser allows focusing of the beam and a telescope is directly coupled through the camera lens for signal collection. With the system's time-gating capability it is possible to measure remote Raman of your distant target and the atmosphere between the laser and target.[25]

 

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TELECOM: American Innovator Scott Douglas Redmond Receives Key U.S. Federal Government Engineering Validation

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American Innovator Scott Douglas Redmond Receives Key U.S. Federal Government Engineering Validation

By Andrew Cohen New York -

When you want to move high quality movies, large X-Ray files and big data sets over the internet you need to break those files up into something the internet can handle. Imagine trying to shove a single 15,000 pound elephant through your front door! It isn’t going to work very well. Let’s say that the elephant represents a high definition movie. You could push and shove and bend the elephant to try to jam him through your door. You might have to break the elephant in the process. This will be bad for both you and the elephant. Now let’s say you had 15,000 pounds worth of kittens that also represented that exact same movie. All you would need to do is open your door, put some catnip on the other side of the door and watch the kitties pour through the door like liquid mercury. That is how Bittorrent, Akamai, Kontiki and all of world’s high quality peer-to-peer mesh media distribution works; with the kittens and not the elephant. That is what Redmond invented and the federal government has now issued a large number of patent awards to Redmond to confirm it. Peer-to-peer mesh media distribution is the version with the kittens and the catnip.

It saves billions of dollars, eliminates the buffering stalls and lags, and gives you your media in the highest possible quality. Redmond’s technology also has advanced versions which are “the most anti-theft media files around.” The United States Government was challenged with investigating the claim over who first designed, engineered, documented, launched and first sold peer-to-peer mesh networked media distribution. Brahm Cohen of Bittorrent and Scott have had an ongoing bet about who was first. Scott Douglas Redmond won the bet! The government, the document records and the NDAs proved that Redmond was up and running years before Bittorrent. In one of Redmond’s deployments known as CLICKMOVIE, which was the first Netflix or Youtube-type online video storefront (before either of those companies even existed), Redmond was already delivering all of the functionality of YouTube years before YouTube was even formed.

Now Redmond is offering his technology to the world and helping disaster-relief and democracy programs with information and communication resources globally. Redmond created the first Democracy emergency services App, launched with the help of Steve Jobs and the Apple App store, for the Japanese Tsunami and later, for global refugee regions. Working with Sony Pictures’ most senior level executives, Redmond developed Sony Pictures MovieLink and Sony Vue online video distribution system. Redmond’s team is the only outside entity mentioned in extensive references in Sony’s own federal government patent filings. Redmond is strongly opposed to the use of his technology for piracy. He says that he built the technology for “efficiency and infrastructure cost savings and not for copyright violators...” In line with Peter Thiel’s “payback-is-a-bitch” efforts, Redmond has also been assisting with tabloid publication ethics efforts and counter-measures. When I asked Scott Douglas Redmond what he attributes his career of top problem solving inventions to, he says that “Luck is when preparation meets with opportunity. Observe the world around you and society will always tell you what it needs next. Then build the thing that will solve a problem for the most people.”

Redmond has been awarded dozens of U.S. federal patents on products in use by millions of people around the globe. He has sold companies and technologies to top investment groups ranging from global developers to Microsoft staff to federal agencies. What is Redmond working on next? With a wink, he replies “Something big…!”

 

 

Tags: Scott Redmond, Scott Douglas Redmond, Brahm Cohen, Sony Pictures, Bittorrent, Akamai, Kontiki, Microsoft, Peter Thiel, Movielink, Sony Vue, Sony Morpheus, ClickMovie, clickmovie.com, dropbox, qualcomm, Flashlinq, Peer-to-peer, Mesh networks, P2P Mesh, Democri-C

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TELECOM: Peer-To-Peer Mesh Network Technologies

The network technology that self-heals, saves billions and works anywhere on Earth

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PEER-TO-PEER Network Technologies By Scott

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: A variety of projects which deploy collaborative device connection to support communications in challenged regions and disaster situations. Our teams have built, patented, deployed and delivered some of the first, and leading, peer to peer technology in the world. Some of our team technology has saved many, many lives. PHYSICS: Any device that can see an electromagnetic signal can often also send an electromagnetic signal. Many devices, today, can send and receive many types of electromagnetic signals, on the same device, some concurrently. This approach turns each device (ie: your smartphone or gamebox)  into its own broadcasting, reception and relay station. This technology needs no servers, towers or infrastructure to operate. Signals can range from audio, radio, light, IR, UV, vibration, laser, reflection, GPS interrupts, induction,  and other modifications of the I/O capabilities of the device. USES:  To support communications in challenged regions and disaster situations

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http://www.vimeo.com/125658259

http://www.vimeo.com/125390652

http://www.vimeo.com/125390151

http://www.vimeo.com/125390152

http://www.vimeo.com/126023660

Related Past Projects:

Our team developed, engineered, produced, patented and marketed the software suite that has become one of the leading solutions sets in the intelligence, defense and emergency services arenas globally with over $300 Million invested in it’s production and deployment. One of the packages was distributed by Apple Computer with marketing personally accelerated by Steve Jobs in support of the Tsunami disaster. Other versions of the software have been used in refugee zones globally. When an illegal copycat version of our software failed in one region (Putting lives at risk), our authorized version kept on working. Our architecture has been proven to be unstoppable – against all odds. The full version STILL has yet to be hacked, in the field, by any known technology. It is STILL the least network- congestive, lowest-cost infrastructure, most ultra-secure, network solution in the world! A copy of the Movie: BIRTH OF A NATION was placed in the network flow out on the open web, using the technology, with a phrase imprinted across the center of the image. A $250,000.00 reward was offered to anyone who could provide a fully reassembled copy of the film with the imprinted image and certification headers intact. To this day: Nobody has been able to acquire that film sample off of the web, and reassemble it; proving the strength of the technology.
 

EMERGENCY REFUGEE COMMUNICATIONS FOR DISASTERS AND WAR-ZONES:

The CIA's associated group: IN-Q-TEL, invited us to show our technology to them and then delivered it, via their sister organization: New America Foundation, under the names Serval, Commotion, and other identifiers. Federal accounting agencies report that over $200M has been spent, to date, via State Department budgets, to deliver the system globally. Peer-to-peer data relaying is now the #1 software solution for troubled regions and disaster zones. 

Scott’s Original “Internet in a Suitcase” - Multiple U.S. Patents issued as "First-To-Invent"

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When inferior copy-cat versions failed, costing lives, our original version kept on working.

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Using the technology, only 3 people's cell phones can cover San Francisco from ocean-to-bay, without the need for any servers.

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FIRECHAT and other P2P Emergency Communications Systems Are Changing The World:


GET IT ON IOS STORES and at  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.opengarden.firechat

The internet-free messaging app that’s sweeping the world

Apps use P2P combination of Bluetooth and WiFi

We already have Whatsapp, Facebook messenger, Snapchat etc, what makes FireChat different?
You can chat “off the grid”, even if there is no internet connection or mobile phone coverage. How is that possible? Instead of relying on a central server, it is based on peer-to-peer “mesh networking” and connects to nearby phones using Bluetooth and WiFi, with connectivity increasing as more people use it in an area. Firechat lets you talk anonymously Where might this be useful? According to FireChat, “on the beach or in the subway, at a big game or a trade show, camping in the wild or at a concert, or even travelling abroad, simply fire up the app with a friend or two and find out who else is there.” Seriously though. In Hong Kong mostly, where pro-democracy protesters are using it to communicate amid fears of network shutdowns. It’s also been used by Iraqis and Taiwanese students during their anti-Beijing Sunflower Movement. Aside from not being reliant on the internet (which some governments restrict), it is more clandestine and less traceable. You can also join group conversations How popular is FireChat? Over 100,000 people downloaded it in 24 hours in Hong Kong over the weekend, with the CEO saying that numbers are “booming” and up to 33,000 people were using the app at the same time.
CNN NEWS:

– Lasers, Video Projectors, Drones, P2P, coded-hashcodes, Mass-mouthing – GEEK VS. GEEK CYBERWAR! – Lasers write messages on buildings and project animations – Pocket video projectors show digital posters and movies on sides of buildings – Protestor’s drones monitor crowd safety – Entire New INTERNET, built by Democracy Protestors, does not use any corporate back-bone infrastructure. – Complex codes on Twitter and in TEXT messages have hidden meanings – Blinking laser dots on buildings use MORSE CODE – Arm Signals and hand signals use visual message relay – Hong Kong protesters in cyberwar

 

By Jeff Yang
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 A pro-democracy protester holds on to a barrier as he and others defend a barricade from attacks by rival protest groups in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong on Saturday, October 4.

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 Pro-democracy student protesters pin a man to the ground after an assault during a scuffle with local residents in Mong Kok, Hong Kong on October 4. Friction persisted between pro-democracy protesters and opponents of their weeklong occupation of major Hong Kong streets, and police denied they had any connection to criminal gangs suspected of inciting attacks on largely peaceful demonstrators.

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 Pro-democracy protesters raise their arms in a sign of nonviolence as they protect a barricade from rival protest groups in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong on October 4.
 
Students in the massive protests in Hong Kong want representative democracy
  • Jeff Yang: These protesters may be the most sophisticated and technologically savvy ever
  • He says Chinese authorities are blocking images and creating apps that trick protesters
  • Yang: Smartphone a great tool for populist empowerment but it can easily be used against us

Editor’s note: Jeff Yang is a columnist for The Wall Street Journal Online and can be heard frequently on radio as a contributor to shows such as PRI’s “The Takeaway” and WNYC’s “The Brian Lehrer Show.” He is the author of “I Am Jackie Chan: My Life in Action” and editor of the graphic novel anthologies “Secret Identities” and “Shattered.” The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

(CNN) — The massive protests in Hong Kong took an ugly turn on Friday when students pressing for representative democracy clashed with opponents, prompting a breakdown of talks aimed at defusing the crisis.

This negativity followed a week of remarkably peaceful civil disobedience in what has been dubbed the “Umbrella Revolution,” after the widely shared image of a man defiantly holding up an umbrella in a haze of police tear gas fired to disperse the tens of thousands of activists crowding the city’s main government and business thoroughfare, the region referred to as Central.

But protesters shrugged off the gas assault as if it had never happened. Behind the barricades, they studied for exams, coordinated the cleanup and recycling of trash generated by the crowd, and jerry-rigged guerrilla charging stations for the voluminous array of devices the demonstrators are using as part of the sophisticated war they’re waging on the virtual front, wielding the digital-age weapons of image feeds, live streaming video and ceaseless social media updates.

 
 
Jeff Yang

The Umbrella Revolution is hardly the first protest to harness the power of technology to coordinate activities and broadcast messages, but it’s almost certainly the most sophisticated.

Andrew Lih, a journalism professor at American University, discussed the infrastructure the activists have adopted in an article for Quartz, a system that incorporates fast wireless broadband, multimedia smartphones, aerial drones and mobile video projectors, cobbled together by pro-democracy geektivists like the ad-hoc hacker coalition Code4HK.

Given this remarkable show of force by the crowd under the Umbrella, it’s not surprising that Beijing has moved quickly to prevent transmissions from reaching the mainland, blocking Chinese access to Instagram, where images and videos from the demonstrations and police crackdowns are regularly being posted, and banning all posts on popular messaging sites like Weibo and WeChat carrying keywords that refer to the protests.

Activists have fought back by downloading the peer-to-peer “mesh messaging” app FireChat — which allows communication among nearby users even when centralized mobile services are unavailable by linking smartphones directly to one another via Bluetooth and wifi — in the hundreds of thousands, and by creating an elaborate system of numerical hashtags to stand in for forbidden terms.

For example, #689 is the codename for Hong Kong chief executive C.Y. Leung, referring to the number of votes he received in his selection as the region’s highest government representative, a scant majority of the 1,200 members of the the Communist Party-approved nominating committee. #8964 references Beijing’s brutal June 4, 1989, crackdown on student democracy activists in Tiananmen Square, which casts a looming shadow over the Occupy Central demonstrations.

These strategies seem to have prompted the Chinese authorities to resort to new and more insidious tactics. Links — seemingly posted by Code4HK — have begun popping up on social media, inviting users to download a new app that allows for secure coordination of protest activities.

Instead, clicking the link downloads a Trojan horse that gives its developers — presumed by some security experts to be “red hat’ hackers working with support from the Chinese government — open access to the messages, calls, contacts, location and even the bank information and passwords of those naive enough to download it.

That’s a harsh lesson not just for those living under authoritarian regimes, but for us citizens of nominally free and democratic societies as well.

The smartphone is by far the most formidable tool for populist empowerment ever invented, turning individual human beings into mobile broadcast platforms and decentralized mobs into self-organizing bodies. But it’s also jarringly easy for these devices to be used against us.

Here in the United States, revelations of the existence of massive government surveillance programs like the NSA’s PRISM have caused an uproar among digital libertarians. Likewise, criminal smartphone hacking and cloud cracking has led to the release of celebrity nude photos and sex videos, to the humiliation of those who thought them private.

The response from leading smartphone developers like Apple and Google has been to announce new methods of locking and encrypting information to make it harder for individuals, businesses or governments to gain access to our personal information.

But even as they add these fresh layers of security, they continue to extend the reach of these devices into our lives, with services that integrate frictionless financial transactions and home systems management into our smartphones, and wearable accessories that capture and transmit our very heartbeats.

Imagine how much control commercial exploiters, criminals — or overreaching law enforcement — might have if it gained access to all these features. The upshot is that we increasingly have to take matters into our own hands (and handsets), policing our online behavior and resisting the temptation to click on risky links.

It may be worth exploring innovative new tools that offer unblockable or truly secure alternatives to traditional communications, like the free VPN browser extension Hola, which evades global digital boundaries to Web access; open-source projects likeServal and Commotion, which are attempting to develop standards for mesh connectivity that route around the need for commercial mobile phone networks; and apps like RedPhone and Signal, which offer free, worldwide end-to-end encrypted voice conversations.

Most of these are works in progress. But as technology becomes ever more deeply embedded into our lifestyles, keeping our digital identities secure and private is becoming increasingly critical. And as the protests in Hong Kong have shown, the only solution may be to use technology to defend against technology — in other words, to fight fire with FireChat.

Read CNNOpinion’s new Flipboard magazine

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook.com/CNNOpinion.


EXAMPLES OF TECHNOLOGY:

 

HTTP://p2p-Internet.weebly.com

 

IEEE Communications Magazine Publishes InterDigital Paper on P2P Communications

written by sstocker
 
InterDigital’s M2M team was recently published in the prestigious IEEE Communications Magazine with their article, “CA-P2P: Context-Aware Proximity-Based Peer-to-Peer Wireless Communications.” The work was co-authored by Chonggang Wang, Qing Li, Hongkun Li, Paul Russell, Jr. and Zhuo Chen, all engineers at InterDigital. The authors argue that CA-P2P may be a viable solution to both existing and new proximity-based services, including commercial applications such as advertising as well as emergency/disaster relief, when centralized networks may become unavailable.  Taking various levels of context into account during the P2P connection results in quick, efficient peer discovery and peer association. This will become increasingly important in the emerging fifth generation, with growing numbers of small cell and D2D communications becoming common. The paper delves into the benefits and challenges of CA-P2P and offers performance evaluations of simulations as evidence. Interested in learning even more? Visit our Vault, where you can search keywords such as peer-to-peer, device-to-device, D2D and IoT to find additional resources.

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MEDIA: VIRTUAL REALITY AND ENHANCED REALITY PROJECTS

Inventors of some of VR's first big hits!

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Virtual Reality & Simulation/Visualization Technologies

Our team is known as “The Father’s of VR”. They built, and received U.S. Government patent awards on, the first immersive VR and augmented digital reality systems. Some of those systems were very expensive, as high as $2.5M at the time. Now you buy them in retail stores for under $600.
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MORE PROJECT TRACK RECORD VIDEO: Our patented ShapeWALL Tactile VR Surface Modules, Pods, Mobile devices and Modeling surfaces. From “Crazy Idea” to functional tool:

Our super-low cost VR googles:

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 If you can use tape, scissors, glue and pliers; you can, most likely, build some of these systems yourself. You already have the main part of the electronics by using your phone, tablet, computer or gamebox. You don’t even have to tear any electronics apart. You can make what you already have do dual purpose. As shown in this image, and in the time-stamps on our patent filings and issuance’s, we developed one of the first, if not the first, uses of a smartphone as the head-mounted display and position-sensor unit:   Discussion Of Parts Suppliers: Get a new back mount or get new lenses and swap them out when you need to. It is designed for hot swap lenses. Ideal lenses are the stacked Fresnel flat stamp 70-120 degree or the Erfle 65 degree lens, or the Plano Convex 92/95 degree lens. These lenses, or lens sets, can be purchased from various suppliers online for less than $30.00. You can hot dip the whole mount in truck bed coating or black electrical tape-it for various amounts of blackout/immersion of the unit. (A famous game company spent millions on legal research to determine that due to past litigation from users of other gaming VR headsets from other companies, not ours, one cannot legally sell you a fully blacked-out headset mount.) You choose your safest blackout/immersion level based on your use and safety parameters.


Past VR Work & Products Include:

The U.S. Government, after extensive investigation, awarded us multiple seminal patents as sole inventor of immersive virtual reality chambers, now known as “The Cave” or “The Holodeck”. This technology is used in the highest end tactical mission simulators and defense training systems:  We has consulted on Virtual Reality, Networked Simulation and wearable visualization technologies for a number of government and corporate clients. Here is an E! Entertainment Network segment about Scott’s work with the Production of Oliver Stone’s“Wild Palms”:

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http://www.vimeo.com/125658258

CLICK EACH THUMBNAIL TO ENLARGE:

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TELECOM: Close-loop three-laser scheme for chaos-encrypted message transmission

A Light-Casting Li-Fi detail sheet for deployment of one variable in our patented mobile technology. For information on purchasing the mobile version of this technology, Contact us.

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Quantum Computing DRM for mobile movie delivery? Yep!

Close-loop three-laser scheme for chaos-encrypted message transmission

 

DOI: 10.1007/s11082-010-9435-6

Cite this article as:
Annovazzi-Lodi, V., Aromataris, G., Benedetti, M. et al. Opt Quant Electron (2010) 42: 143. doi:10.1007/s11082-010-9435-6

Abstract

In this paper, we numerically evaluate private data transmission using a three-laser scheme, consisting of a pair of twin semiconductor lasers, driven to chaos by delayed optical feedback in a short cavity, and optically injected by a third chaotic laser which forces them to synchronize. This laser is selected with different internal parameters with respect to the twin pair, so that the emissions of the synchronized, matched lasers, are highly correlated, whereas their correlation with the driver is low. The digital message modulates the emission of the transmitter, as in a standard Chaos Modulation scheme. Message recovery is then obtained by subtracting, from the transmitted chaos-masked message, the chaos, locally generated by the synchronized receiver laser. Simulations have been performed with the Lang-Kobayashi model, and, in view of application to private transmission, we have investigated the effect of the parameter mismatch, between transmitter and receiver, on message recovery. A preliminary experimental evaluation has been also performed using specially designed InP integrated modules.

Keywords

Optical chaosChaos synchronizationCommunication systemsPrivate transmission

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TELECOM: Peer-to-peer internet makes every phone, gamebox, and anything with an antenna become an entire cell phone company.

P2P.png

Peer-to-peer internet makes every phone, gamebox, and anything with an antenna become an entire cell phone company.

The international public internet group (IPIG) http://p2p-internet.weebly.com wants developers to know that internet is free, unlimited and you can reach it anywhere on Earth. Finding a cell phone tower or cable box is not required in order to reach the web.

The cell phone and cable companies spend billions of dollars trying to keep you from finding out about this. They will not be able to profiteer off you if you find out a basic service is actually available to everyone, for free.

Peer-to-Peer Internet and “Neighbor-Networked Web” just made ISP's obsolete overnight

FREE UNLIMITED INTERNET FROM PUBLIC P2P MESH NETWORKS IS HERE, NOW!

Per The P2P Alliances at http://p2p-internet.weebly.com

NYC Mesh is trying to get around the big ISPs — one node at a time. Between them and the Red Hook Initiative, here's the state of mesh networks in Brooklyn.

Brian Hall gets on his laptop and types “ev.mesh/” in the address bar. A splash page opens. “This is the Mesh. This is not the internet.”

From this page, Hall chats with other people connected to “the Mesh.” Soon, he hopes to create a social network, where people will find local events and special deals advertised by local businesses. Maybe they’ll even be able to access Netflix, Hall said, admitting that this last wish is “just a wacky idea for the future.”

Brian Hall is a member of NYC Mesh, an organization that tries to build a decentralized network of devices, or “nodes,” which are connected between them. This network is called “the Mesh,” or meshnet, and is independent from the internet: If the internet is down, people who have access to a node can still be connected to each other. And unlike the internet, access to a mesh network is free, once you’ve bought the hardware to set up the network.

The goal of NYC Mesh is to connect all New Yorkers, provide free internet and “be an alternative to Time Warner,” Hall said.

Eight people faced their computers in a room on 3rd Avenue in Brooklyn, during one of NYC Mesh’s recent meetings. In Spain, a meshnet group, Guifi.net, managed to create a 20,000-node network, Hall said — actually the network has close to 30,000 nodes, according to Guifi’s website. One person at the table asked how many NYC Mesh nodes exist. “About 17, I think,” Hall answered with a smile, as he looked down on the table.

The Community-Owned ISPs Building an Alternative to Big Telecom in New York City

Written by Jason Koebler Staff Writer

If you want high speed internet in most any spot in New York City, you’re stuck with Time Warner Cable. Or at least, that’s how it usually works. But increasingly around the city, citizens and small community groups are setting up their own locally owned and operated free wifi networks.

This week on Radio Motherboard, we take a trip to a meetup where two nascent but potentially disruptive groups were discussing how to collaborate in order to provide new connection options to people around the city. Since 2012, the nonprofit Red Hook Wifi network has been providing totally free internet to people in the small Brooklyn neighborhood. For weeks after Hurricane Sandy struck the neighborhood, the Red Hook Wifi network was the only way many in the community could get on the internet or make phone calls. On any given day, Red Hook Wifi has about 500 users.

Meanwhile, NYC Mesh is little more than a meetup group at the moment, but its organizers have big plans. Its network currently has about 40 “nodes,” or routers that connect to each other to form a larger wireless network. Organizer Brian Hall is currently working to set up two “super nodes” that are jacked into a large internet exchange will allow anyone in lower Manhattan and large swaths of Brooklyn to bypass traditional internet service providers and connect directly to the NYC Mesh network.

Finally, a brand new fiber project is about to give the masses a new option, at least when they’re out on the streets of New York. Link NYC is a $200 million project to replace 7,500 payphones in the city with a free, gigabit fiber-connected wifi hotspot. We took a trip to Link NYC’s headquarters to check out the new “links” and learn about how the project hopes to protect privacy, become a profitable enterprise, and provide connections that people will actually want to use.

Topics: Radio Motherboard, podcasts, new york city, Red Hook Wifi, Broadband competition, Municipal Networks, NYC Mesh, mesh networks

The challenge is to scale up to a size where it becomes a reliable internet source,” Hall said.

Programmers and people with a tech background “all get the idea immediately,” Hall said. They like the idea of having a community-run network that doesn’t need the big internet providers. But it’s hard to sustain without getting more people onboard. “The average person is just looking for internet, really,” Hall said. “Non-technical people just want to watch Netflix so it’s hard to explain to them.”

Free internet might be a selling point for Hall. If one node has access to the internet, it can provide internet to the other nodes of the mesh network for free.

That echoes the project another Brooklyn-based organization is also currently developing.

Building a free internet network that bypasses the big providers was on the mind of workers at Red Hook Initiative (RHI) for a while, but “Hurricane Sandy kind of pushed the development,” said Robert Smith, the assistant administrator for RHI’s free WiFi project. During Hurricane Sandy, the internet was down, and RHI started to set up internet access points so people could get information and contact their families, Smith said.

FOR TECHNICAL DETAILS ON ONE SOLUTION SEE:

http://www.tranzeo.com/products/docs/EnRoute500-Mesh-sample-design-report.pdf

RHI pays its internet subscription to Brooklyn Fiber, and redistributes this coverage for free to a dozen parts of Red Hook. “We still have a lot of work to do,” Smith said. There are 13 routers operating now, and Smith said he thinks they need about 40 to 50 to cover the entire neighborhood.

Back in the 3rd Avenue room, Brian Hall said he’s planning to offer similar services via NYC Mesh. As his organization installs more nodes, he hopes to connect network with others in New York City, including the one RHI has set up. Before his meshnet reaches Red Hook, though, Hall will have to convince a lot of Netflix lovers to set up a node.

ALSO SEE:

http://stopthecap.com/tag/antennas/

http://motherboard.vice.com/en_uk/read/how-a-diy-network-plans-to-subvert-time-warner-cables-nyc-internet-monopoly

Gregoire Molle is a recent graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism who has covered Brooklyn for The Brooklyn Ink. The native of France is a former radio intern for Parisian radio station Vivre FM, where he reported and produced daily stories for its news show.

Profile   /   @GregoireMolle  

The internet may feel free, but it certainly isn't. The only way for most people to get it is through a giant corporation like Comcast or Time Warner Cable, companies that choke your access and charge exorbitant prices.

In New York City, a group of activists and volunteers called NYC Mesh are trying to take back the internet. They're building something called a mesh network — a makeshift system that provides internet access. Their goal is to make TWC totally irrelevant.

How it works: Mesh networks start with one internet connection, which broadcasts that connection to another router and then jumps from router to router until it builds a whole web of "nodes." Each node is its own access point where you can log onto the internet like any other Wi-Fi connection.

In New York, NYC Mesh has about 40 of these nodes installed, and for the cost of the router (about $30), volunteers will come by and climb trees or rooftops to wire up a new node for anyone who wants to host one.

Mesh networks aren't just a makeshift version of a mainstream internet provider — they're an opportunity to create something more free and resilient. Mesh networks like the one in Red Hook, Brooklyn, are built so that if Time Warner broadband goes down in the area, mesh users still have internet access. What mesh networks need are new nodes that can daisy-chain out to existing nodes to reach places where traditional Wi-Fi hasn't gotten to. And in some parts of the world, this is already happening.

A global revolution: Mesh networks caught fire during Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution, a student-led protest movement in 2014. During the protests, the open internet wasn't safe: Chinese government was deleting mentions of the sit-ins online, wiping posts from Chinese sites and blacking out CNN's news coverage of the movement. 

So the protesters used an app called Firechat, which turns every phone into a node by linking them all together over Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to communicate. Tens of thousands of protesters at a time were organizing anonymously, without the use of an established cellular network where they could face censorship.

Mesh networks aren't just used for subverting government censors and telecom giants. They can also bring the internet to those who don't have a national broadband infrastructure.

To bring the internet to Spanish farmland and blow past telecommunications giant Telefónica, a Spanish NGO created guifi.net, the world's largest mesh network with over 30,000 nodes. In Germany, the Freifunk initiative helps people create free local networks where there are few public Wi-Fi access points.

If a storm or flood wipes out existing cable infrastructure, or knocks out the broadband in an area, a mesh network of rooftop nodes and home routers could bounce the signal along through the air, unhindered.

Guifi

The people's provider: NYC Mesh has the potential to be the internet provider of the people, but there's one problem: If you trace back the internet connections through the nodes to their root, you'll eventually reach the source of the network, which is — guess what — a Time Warner Cable connection.

"Everyone seems to hate Time Warner; that's the thing that unifies the city," NYC Mesh organizer Brian Hall told Motherboard. "It's going to be a while before we replace Time Warner, but there's some hope of it happening."

 

FREE UN-CAPPED, UN-THROTTLED, ULTRA-HIGH-SPEED INTERNET WITHOUT CENSORING HAS ARRIVED AND THERE IS NO POSSIBLE WAY TO STOP IT

The founder of Aereo is promising to bring gigabit internet to every home

At a launch event in New York City today, Chaitanya "Chet" Kanojia, the founder of the now-deceased startup Aereo, launched an ambitious new wireless hub called Starry. Starry is supposed to offer gigabit internet to the home, but delivered over a wireless network rather than a traditional wired one. The technology was built by the same antenna experts who made Aereo, and may run into its own regulatory troubles as it attempts to leverage unlicensed bands of spectrum.

"It’s a little bit like witchcraft."

Like Aereo, Starry is a questionably ambitious idea. Kanojia wants to deliver extremely high-speed internet over the air using millimeter waves, which don't travel very far and aren't very good at penetrating obstacles — not even water in the air. That means Starry will have a lot of technical hurdles to overcome. The company is only presenting a sleek wireless hub at its event today, but it seems like more hardware — perhaps something outside the home — will be needed to fully connect to Starry's gigabit wireless network. It also means that Starry will need to set up broadcast points in very close proximity to its customers or use some sort of mesh technology to improve its reach. Doing that would likely make it harder for Starry to reach its goal of gigabit speeds. So, to be very clear, there's a lot to be skeptical about here.

Starry hasn't provided details on how it'll get around the many technical limitations in its way. "What are millimeter waves you ask? It’s a little bit like witchcraft," Kanojia says. The company keeps repeating a dense list of technologies — OFDM modulation, MU-MIMO, active phased array — which apparently add up to a solution. Kanojia acknowledges that no one has attempted internet delivery over millimeter waves before because it's difficult to get a connection from outside to inside of a house. But Starry has supposedly figured out a way to "steer" the signal using a bank of tiny antennas that increase the connection's power and accuracy. "People historically assumed fiber was the answer at all times," Kanojia says. Starry's approach, he claims, is "the most meaningful, scalable architecture anyone has proposed to this point."

Kanojia says that he wanted to launch Starry to give consumers an option about how they get internet. Most people are stuck with only one choice of internet provider — two if they're lucky — and it's difficult for new competitors to enter the space. Laying wires is expensive, as is launching a more traditional wireless network, so Kanojia is once again in charge of a company taking an unconventional approach in an attempt to quickly enter and disrupt an established market.

The company's hub, called Starry Station, doubles as a Wi-Fi router that can be controlled through a small touchscreen. The Station is supposed to include a built-in "internet health monitoring system," which will break down how much bandwidth different devices are using throughout the home and can suggest creating new networks to better suit specific devices.

"Did he say what the solution was?"

Starry still has a lot to prove. "A phased array is the worst possible choice for millimeter wave antenna. It’s terrible. I don’t understand it. The feed structure is very lossy, and it’s not cost-effective compared to a reflector or lens antenna," says Spencer Webb, an antenna consultant and President of AntennaSys. "[Kanojia] said it’s hard to go from the outside to the inside, but did he say what the solution was? Millimeter wave won’t go through a window."

Starry will launch its service first in Boston, with its hub selling for $349.99. It hasn't said yet how much it'll cost to get internet service delivered to that hub, but it has said that there will be no contracts or data caps. Sales will start on February 5th, with deliveries beginning in March. Starry plans to launch in additional cities throughout the year.

 

To start using free-forever internet today, see:

SopCast - Free P2P internet TV | live football, NBA, cricket

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SopCast is a simple, free way to broadcast video and audio or watch the video and listen to radio on the Internet. Adopting P2P(Peer-to-Peer) technology, It is very ...

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FilesOverMiles - Send files direct to other users (P2P ...

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Freenet

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Peer to Peer: Das neue Internet | ZEIT ONLINE - Die Zeit

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Kein Problem: Wer seine Daten den umstrittenen Internet-Giganten nicht ... Office -Anwendung, Video- und Datentausch über P2P-Netzwerke.

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PPTV

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wikipedia

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Peer-to-peer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Peer-to-peer (P2P) computing or networking is a distributed application architecture that partitions tasks or work loads between peers. Peers are equally privileged ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer-to-peer

Shareaza - Bringing P2P Together

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Shareaza is a peer-to-peer client for Windows that allows you to download any file-type found on several popular P2P networks. Shareaza is FREE & contains NO Spyware ...

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Watch Football Online

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Watch Football Online. Football live streaming from England, Spain, Germany, Italy and France to your pc or mobile devices. It is free preview only.

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Ares - [Home] Download latest version 2.3.8

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AresGalaxy is a free Filesharing-Bittorrent p2p client connected to TCP supernode/leaf network and UDP DHT network. Ares features a built-in directshow media player ...

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Peer-to-Peer – Wikipedia

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Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Connection (von englisch peer „Gleichgestellter“, ... auf dem Internet realisiert werden, ist daher ein zweites internes Overlay-Netz, welches ...

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Ares | Ares Download - P2P File Sharing Program |...

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Ares.net is the official Ares website of the ONLY working version of Ares – the revolutionary P2P file-sharing platform that lets you download unlimited free music ...

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gulli.com - Internet - Filesharing - Grundwissen - P2P

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P2P steht eigentlich für Peer-to-Peer, also die Verbindung zwischen zwei Teilnehmern einer Tauschbörse. Gemeint ist hierbei also der direkte Austausch von ...

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P2P/Winsock/Internet Programming VB.NET tutorial

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Welcome to the p2p.wrox.com Forums. You are currently viewing the VB.NET section of the Wrox Programmer to Programmer discussions. This is a community of tens of ...

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Internet2 Peer to Peer Working Group - P2P WG

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The Internet2 End-to-End Performance Initiative (E2Epi) is aimed at improving end-to-end performance in the network infrastructure by focusing resources and ...

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The Pirate Bay founders are building a P2P internet | KitGuru

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6 Jan 2014 ... The Pirate Bay has been shaking up the internet for over a decade at this point, first by helping popularise torrents, then by its founders ...

 

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How to setup and configure DVR Cloud P2P …

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Complete version of how to connect DVR to Internet and Android mobile and laptop or Internet Explorer settings from www.cctvcameraspy.com In this video we ...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dbRSZzFUzE

The Alternative P2P Wireless Internet Network: The Netsukuku Idea

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Would it be possible, using p2p and wireless technologies, to gain independence from internet providers and make free and open net ...

 

http://www.masternewmedia.org/the-alte[...]s-internet-network-the-netsukuku-idea/

P2P, Top-Downloads für Linux - Download - heise online

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Internet, Dateitransfer, P2P, 12 Programme für Linux bei heise Download.

 

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Firechat Enables Private Off-The-Internet (P2P) - Disruptive Telephony

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In the text he outlines how they do decentralized "off-the-grid" private messaging using an ad hoc mesh network established between users of ...

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MEDIA: Oliver Stone's Virtual Reality TV Series: "Wild Palms" With Tech-Dev Services by Scott

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Wild Palms: See Scott's E! Entertainment Network Video Interview:

CLICK (OR DOWNLOAD) THE VIDEO AT THIS LINK >>: oliver_stone__star_trek__scott_douglas_redmonds_vr_cave_287.mp4

 
 
Wild Palms
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Wild Palms main cast (listed below)
Created by Bruce Wagner
Written by Bruce Wagner
Starring Nick Mancuso Bebe Neuwirth Angie Dickinson Dana Delany James Belushi Kim Cattrall Robert Loggia
Music by 坂本 龍 (Ryuichi Sakamoto)
Country of origin USA
No. of episodes 5
Production
Executive producer(s) Oliver Stone Bruce Wagner
Producer(s) Michael Rauch
Running time 285 minutes
Release
Original network ABC
Original release May 16, 1993 – May 19, 1993[1]
Wild Palms is a five-hour mini-series which was produced by Greengrass Productions and first aired in May 1993 on the ABC network in the United States. The sci-fi drama, announced as an "event series",[2] deals with the dangers of politically motivated abuse of mass media technology, virtual realities in particular. It was based on a comic strip written by Bruce Wagner and illustrated by Julian Allen first published in 1990 in Details magazine. Wagner, who also wrote the screenplay, served as executive producer together with Oliver Stone. The series stars James Belushi, Dana Delany, Robert Loggia, Kim Cattrall and Angie Dickinson. The episodes were directed by Kathryn Bigelow, Keith Gordon, Peter Hewitt and Phil Joanou.

Contents

Plot synopsis

In the United States in the year 2007, the right-wing "Fathers" dominate large sections in politics and in the media. A libertarian movement, the "Friends", opposes the government, often making use of underground guerilla tactics. In California, the powerful representative of the "Fathers" is Senator Tony Kreutzer, who is also the leader of the religious sect "Church of Synthiotics" and owner of the "Wild Palms" media group. Kreutzer's TV station "Channel 3" is about to start a new television format, "Church Windows", which creates a virtual reality on the basis of popular shows like sitcoms, using a new technique called "Mimecom". Harry Wyckoff is a successful patent attorney on the brink of becoming a partner in the agency he works at. He has two children with his wife Grace, a perfect housewife who also moonlights as a boutique owner: 11-year-old Coty, who has just been cast for the new "Channel 3" series, and the ever-silent 4-year-old Deirdre. His mother-in-law is the impossibly chic socialite and interior decorator Josie Ito, a woman of strong will and numerous connections. At night, Wyckoff is plagued by strange dreams of a rhinoceros and a faceless woman who has palm trees tattooed on her body. One day, he is visited by a former lover of his college days, the alluring Paige Katz, who asks for his help in tracking down her son Peter, who disappeared five years earlier. As Paige is closely associated with Kreutzer's "Wild Palms Group", which Wyckoff's firm is going up against in court, their meetings raise suspicions and cost Wyckoff his promotion. After this, he gladly accepts when Kreutzer offers him a job at "Channel 3" with an even higher salary. In the wake of his new career, Harry's wife Grace alienates from him and attempts suicide. To his dismay Harry learns that Coty is actually the son of Kreutzer and Paige, and that her search request was a plot to bring him and the Senator together. Meanwhile, Coty not only becomes a child TV star but also, due to his ruthlessness, a high-ranking member of the "Church of Synthiotics". Grace's mother turns out to be the Senator's sister who disposes of possible rivals with the same violently brutal means as her brother. Her only weak point is her former marriage to Eli Levitt, leader of the "Friends" and Grace's father, with whom she is still in love. Kreutzer tries to get hold of the "Go chip" which supposedly will enable him to become a living hologram with unlimited power; he does not even stop at murder. Disgusted by his methods, his future wife Paige gives information to the "Friends". Harry discovers that Peter, a straying boy who has connections to the "Friends", is his real son who was taken away by the "Fathers" shortly after his birth. Kreutzer, who suspects Harry of collaborating with his opponents, has him tortured and kidnaps his daughter Deirdre, while Josie throttles her own daughter, Grace, to death. Harry joins the "Friends" and enforces the broadcast of Grace's murder, which had been videotaped. The broadcast causes a social uproar. "Synthiotics" facilities and campaigning offices of Kreutzer, who is running for president, are attacked. Even a transmission of a fake video that shows Harry as Grace's murderer, and the secret execution of Eli can't stop the upheaval. Josie is brutally killed by a former victim, Tully Woiwode. Kreutzer finally manages to get hold of the "Go chip" and has it implanted, but not before it is secretly altered by Harry and Peter. Kreutzer reveals to Harry that he is his biological father, just before he loses cohesion and dissolves into nothingness. As Coty, now the leader of the "Fathers", finds his followers dispersed, Harry, Paige, Peter and Dierdre escape the chaos, although Harry knows he must "go back" and lead the "Friends" against their enemies.

Episodes

ABC aired the mini-series over five consecutive nights:

  • 16 May 1993: Everything Must Go (approx. 90 minutes) - directed by Peter Hewitt
  • 17 May 1993: The Floating World (approx. 45 minutes) - directed by Keith Gordon
  • 18 May 1993: Rising Sons (approx. 45 minutes) - directed by Kathryn Bigelow
  • 19 May 1993: Hungry Ghosts (approx. 45 minutes) - directed by Keith Gordon
  • 20 May 1993: Hello, I Must Be Going (approx. 45 minutes) - directed by Phil Joanou

Cast

  • James Belushi as Harry Wyckoff, a Beverly Hills based patent attorney and later, CEO of the Wild Palms group.
  • Dana Delany as Grace Wyckoff, his wife, suburban housewife and owner of Hiroshima, a retro fashion boutique.
  • Ben Savage as Coty Wyckoff, their 11-year-old son, a child actor on the verge of a breakthrough to stardom.
  • Robert Loggia as Senator Tony Kreutzer, former sci-fi author, founder of the Wild Palms group, and of the Synthiotics cult.
  • Angie Dickinson as Josie Ito, Grace's mother, a celebrated interior decorator with numerous connections and secrets.
  • David Warner as Eli Levitt, Grace's father, former History professor imprisoned for terrorism. Founder of the "Friends".
  • Kim Cattrall as Paige Katz, PR director of the Wild Palms group and Kreutzer's fiancée, she and Harry have past history together.
  • Ernie Hudson as Tommy Laszlo, Harry Wyckoff's childhood friend, an eccentric entrepreneur who is also a closet homosexual.
  • Nick Mancuso as Tully Woiwode, infamous and popular visual artist and toast-of-the-town, Tommy Laszlo's secret lover.
  • Bebe Neuwirth as Tabba Schwartzkopf, Academy Award winning actress who befriends Grace, and is part of the Wild Palms group.
  • Aaron Michael Metchik as Peter Katz, a street urchin with mysterious connections with Harry, Grace and the "Fathers".
  • Brad Dourif as Chickie Levitt, Eli Levitt's son from another relationship. Virtual reality boy genius and technology wizard.
  • Charles Hallahan as Gavin Whitehope, Harry's associate at the Wild Palms group. Reformed alcoholic an Synthiotics devotee.
  • Robert Morse as Chap Starfall, erstwhile pop star reduced to lounge singer status until the Wild Palms group "revives" him.
  • Beata Pozniak as Tambor, the Wyckoff's dutiful au-pair.
  • Bob Gunton as Dr. Tobias Schenkl, Harry's psychiatrist upon whom he confides everything that is going on in his work and home lives.
  • Rondi Reed as Eileen Whitehope, Gavin's wife, a "Lady-who-lunches" who also alerts Grace to a danger in her own home.
  • Charles Rocket as Stitch Walken, a stand-up comedian who is also a surreptitious agent of the "Friends".
  • Eugene Lee as Lt. Bob Grindrod, a corrupt detective of the LAPD under contract to the Wild Palms group.
  • Fraçois Chau as Hiro, Grace's childhood sweetheart from her years spent in Japan, and an enemy of Kreutzer.
  • Monica Mikala as Deirdre Wyckoff, Harry and Grace's silent four-year-old daughter, who gets kidnapped and used as a pawn later on.

Cameos

  • Cyberpunk author William Gibson has a cameo appearance as himself. When the author is introduced as the man who invented the term Cyberspace, he remarks, "and they won't let me forget it".
  • Wild Palms producer and film director Oliver Stone also has a cameo. In a fictitious interview he appears as himself and comments on the release of files pertinent to the assassination of John F. Kennedy, revealing that the theories in his film JFK were right.
  • Wild Palms director Kathryn Bigelow has an uncredited cameo. She plays the character Maisy Woiwode.

Production

Oliver Stone had originally planned to film Bruce Wagner's novel Force Majeure, but then decided to film Wagner's comic strip Wild Palms, published in Details magazine, instead: "It was so syncretic. It was such a fractured view of the world. Everything and anything could happen. Maybe your wife isn't your wife, maybe your kids aren't your kids. It really appealed to me." Wagner referred to his creation as "a sort of surreal diary […] a tone poem", set in an "Orwellian Los Angeles". ABC agreed to finance the project on a budget of $11 Million, but, remembering the eventual decline of David Lynch's Twin Peaks, insisted that the series had "a complete story, with a beginning, a middle, and an end".[2][3] Actor James Belushi compared the series (among others) to the British TV serial The Prisoner, and stated: "It's very tough, very challenging—a lot of viewers probably won't dig it." Dana Delany suggested that viewers should "let it wash over you, enjoy each scene, and by the end it'll make sense". Robert Loggia compared it to Elizabethan play The Duchess of Malfi and the ancient Greek tragedy Medea. ABC, bound to make sure that viewers wouldn't lose attention, had a supplemental book, The Wild Palms Reader, published and offered a telephone hotline with the show's initial run.[2] These measures notwithstanding, Stone considered the atmosphere to be more important than the storyline.[4] William Gibson later stated that "while the mini-series fell drastically short of the serial, it did produce one admirably peculiar literary artifact, The Wild Palms Reader" (to which he contributed). Both Stone and Gibson called Wagner the creative force behind the series.[4][5]

Production design

The United States of the year 2007 as depicted in the series shows a strong influence of Japanese culture, e. g., in dress and interior and exterior design. Holograms of Miss Alabama and girl group The Supremes even bear Japanese facial features. Other interior details show the influence of Scottish designer and architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868–1928). Deliberately anachronistic elements include 1960s cars (like Studebaker police vehicles) and Edwardian fashion.

References in Wild Palms

Non-fictitious references

While the comic strip makes clear references with Senator Kreutzer to Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, the series gives only allusions. Hubbard publicised a psychological technique, "Dianetics", which is practised in his "Church of Scientology". Kreutzer's technique is called "Synthiotics", and his religious organization "Church of Synthiotics". Kreutzer's organization has a naval subsidiary called "The Floating World", paralleling the "Church of Scientology"'s "Sea Org". In their reviews of the series, both The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly noted resemblances.[1][6] Shortly after Harry joins the "Wild Palms Group", competing TV stations file a lawsuit against the senator's company, arguing that his new exclusive broadcasting technique "Mimecom" would create a technical monopoly. The lawsuit refers to the 1948 Paramount Consent Decree which forced major Hollywood studios to sell their movie theater chains to liquidate the existing oligopoly. During a conversation, Kreutzer explains that his mother died as victim of Executive Order 9066 because she had Japanese ancestors. In 1942, U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt had signed EO 9066 which led to the internment of Japanese Americans and Japanese living along the Pacific coast of the United States in so called "War Relocation Camps". A manipulated video showing Harry killing his wife Grace (who was in fact murdered by her mother Josie) is announced to be broadcast on several TV channels. CNN alone is mentioned by name. After the broadcast, Harry contacts Josie one last time, sarcastically suggesting that she should start a weekly TV show featuring the murder of a surprise guest. As the first two attendants, he proposes ancient Roman dictator Caesar and controversial union leader Jimmy Hoffa who disappeared in 1975.

Artistic and other references

Literature

  • The poem Of Mere Being by Wallace Stevens is repeatedly used as a mantra by "Synthiotics" members.
  • Running to Paradise by W. B. Yeats is, among others, quoted by Senator Kreutzer in conversation with Harry Wyckoff: "The wind is old and still at play / While I must hurry upon my way, / For I am running to Paradise."
  • Comedian Stitch Walken quotes a chapter title ("The Pool of Tears") from Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland: "Down, down, down through the pool of tears."
  • Grace alludes to her life as the Diary of a Mad Housewife—a very popular 1960s novel by Sue Kaufman, which deals with the crack-up of the titular character.
  • The hologram of Dex Wyckoff recites Shakespeare's Hamlet: "It is an honest ghost, that let me tell you."
  • When given a precious dagger by Eli Levitt, Harry quotes The Art of War by Sun Tzu.
  • The Hollow Men by T. S. Eliot features in Kreutzer's last words: "This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper."
  • O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman is repeatedly alluded to and recited by the "Friends".

Other books are referred to variously in dialogue, including Neuromancer, The Illustrated Man, The Day of the Locust, Stranger in a Strange Land, The Emperor's New Mind and Grimms' Fairy Tales.

Music

Other songs referred to are Frankie Valli's "Can't Take My Eyes Off You", Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On", and "19th Nervous Breakdown" (as "18th Nervous Breakdown") by The Rolling Stones.

  • Gimme Shelter [The Rolling Stones] is used several times in the soundtrack

Film

References in dialogue or images can also be found to From Here to Eternity, Bride of Frankenstein, The Eagle Has Landed, Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon, Kwaidan, The Shining, Goldfinger and the TV shows Star Trek, The Mickey Mouse Club, and The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show.

Visual arts

  • While describing the random seizing of a man in a restaurant, Harry points out "[it] looked like one of those Robert Longo paintings".
  • Tully Woiwode is claimed to have sold "deconstructed" Hockney paintings.
  • After Kreutzer has supposedly died, his son Coty states that he saw his body floating over the roof "like a Chagall".

Religion

  • While being visited by Josie, Chickie Levitt prays the Jewish Kaddish.
  • As seen throughout the series, the cult of Synthiotics is a fictionalized variation on some of the themes of Scientology and its inception is quite similar, with Kreutzer being partially modelled after L. Ron Hubbard.
  • When asked about the effect the "Go chip" implantation will have on Kreutzer, his sister Josie explains, "he'll be like Christ".
  • Buddhism is referenced numerous ways throughout the series. Several characters mutter, "Everything must go," an allusion to detachment. Hungry Ghosts, another Buddhist concept, is referenced in dialogue and by an episode title.

Other

The recurring rhinoceros image is a symbol used by Keutzer's "Synthiotics" associates: Kreutzer's sister Josie tells his son Coty early on not to be afraid of the rhino. Later, Coty leaves one toy rhinoceros at the site of Gavin Whitehope's murder; another one is stuffed into the mouth of a murdered "Friends" collaborator. In Eugène Ionesco's play Rhinoceros, human individuals turn into rhinoceroses, symbolizing conformity and affirmation of a totalitarian mass movement. To character Paige Katz, the rhino also represents maternity.

Thematically related works

In David Cronenberg's film Videodrome (1983), lenses manufacturer "Spectacular Optical" plans to change the viewers' perception of reality with their "Videodrome" program and forces TV station owner Max Renn to hand over his "Channel 83" for broadcast. In Wild Palms, the "Wild Palms Group" uses the "Mimecom" technique on its own "Channel 3" to manipulate their audience. In Videodrome, the organisation behind "Spectacular Optical" wants to release the viewers' potential aggressive energies and reinstate a strong North America which is currently "rotting from the inside". In Wild Palms, televised virtual realities are used to draw the audience's attention away from the state's increasing totalitarianism. In Videodrome, "Channel 83" owner Renn finally turns against the conspirators, killing their chief executive and shouting, "Death to Videodrome! Long live the New Flesh!" In Wild Palms, a manipulated video shows Harry murdering his wife Grace, proclaiming "Long live the Friends! Death to New Realism!" In Philip K. Dick's novel The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (1965), consumers immerse themselves into an artificial soap opera world, which appears virtually real, by taking a drug called Can-D. In Wild Palms, the pseudo-realistic effect is enhanced by a drug called "Mimezine". In The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, a new drug appears on the market which enables its supplier, Palmer Eldritch, to affect the consumer's perception and personally appear in his altered reality. In Wild Palms, senator Kreutzer wants the "Go chip" implantated into his body, which as his sister Josie explains will turn him into a hologram and enable him to enter everyone's dreams. In 2014, Cronenberg and Wagner collaborated on the film Maps to the Stars, starring Julianne Moore and John Cusack, which makes several references to the Wild Palms universe, including pieces of dialogue and certain situations and character traits.

Supplements

Soundtrack album

In addition to Ryuichi Sakamoto's music score, a number of 1960s rock and pop songs and classical compositions could be heard in the series. On the 1993 released soundtrack album, the following songs were included besides Sakamoto's music:

The following songs and compositions can be heard in the series but are not featured on the album:

Books

A book, The Wild Palms Reader, was published by St. Martin's Press before the series aired. It included time lines, secret letters, and character biographies. ABC, concerned that viewers might get "hopelessly lost in the tangled story line",[2] arranged for the primer to be published. It also included writing supposedly from the "world of the series". Contributors included:

While the comic series was published in book form in Germany, the Wild Palms Reader was not. Instead, a novelization, written by German dime novel author Horst Friedrichs, was published under the title Wild Palms.

Reception

Reviews of the series were mixed,[3] with some decidedly positive. The New York Times critic John J. O'Connor called Wild Palms a "truly wild six-hour mini-series" resembling "nothing so much as an acid freak's fantasy, drenched in paranoia and more pop-culture allusions than a Dennis Miller monologue." He described it as "rich and insinuating as a good theatrical film, albeit harder to follow" and concluded, "You wanted something different? Here it is. And Wild Palms also happens to be terrific."[1] Ken Tucker in Entertainment Weekly stated that "in its length, scope, sweeping visual tableaux, and over-the-top passion, Wild Palms is more like an opera than a TV show." Comparing it to David Lynch's Twin Peaks, he decided that "unlike Peaks, which started out brilliantly lucid and then rambled into incoherence, Palms sustains its length and adds layers of complexity to its characters. It also has something crucial that Peaks did not: a sense of humor about itself."[6] Mary Harron of the British Independent suggested that viewers "forget about the message, and about what the rhino means. Wild Palms should be watched like opera; for its gorgeous images, its emotional set-pieces and its high style."[3] Readers of the British trade weekly Broadcast were much more negative, calling it one of the worst television shows ever exported by the U.S. to the U.K. It placed fourth on their list, exceeded only by Baywatch, The Anna Nicole Show and The Dukes of Hazzard.[7] TV Guide also blasted it, offering the interpretation that Oliver Stone was condemning television while covertly lauding cinematic films. [citation needed]

 
Wild Palms U.S. DVD cover.

Home media releases

Wild Palms was released on VHS cassette in the UK in 1993,[8] where it aired between 15 November and 7 December the same year.[3] It was released on CLV laserdisc in the U.S. in March 1995[9] and on VHS in various countries. It was released as a Region 4 DVD in Australia in 2004, a Region 1 DVD in the U.S. in 2005 and a Region 2 DVD in the UK in 2008.

References

 

 

  1. Laserdisc details from IMDb

External links

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PORTFOLIO: Affiliations and Memberships

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Past Affiliations and Memberships:

Affiliated with several professional organizations reflecting a broad range of expertise. Key memberships have included: National Computer Graphics Association; Society for Information Display; Optical Society of America; American Society for Industrial Security; American Institute of Physics; Illuminating Engineering Society of North America; American Film Institute; Association for Computing Machinery - SIGGRAPH/SIGCHI; International Society for Arts, Science and Technology; Society for Manufacturing Engineers; American Society for Testing Materials, International Themed Entertainment Association; International Interactive Communications Society; Media Communications Association; National Computer Graphics Association; Association Internationale du Film D`Animation; Washington Research Institute; National Association of Exhibit Manager, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Fort Mason Foundation; State of California-Dept. of Consumer Affairs; High Power Laser Systems – USDA; San Francisco Symphony Foundation; and many more…

Past Delivered Projects Led By Scott for Clients and Employers:


§ Development, launch & public marketing of TechMate ™, One of the first-ever online social networks in 1986. Advertised in national newspapers. Confirmed by Secretary of State.

§ Recipient of Congressional Commendation in the Iraq War Bill, Federal Grant, listing in the Federal Register, numerous awards and nominations and extensive suite of issued patents on, an instant-swap/recharge battery that runs longer than almost any other battery, can use almost any one of over 3000 chemical configurations, leaves only drinkable water as it's waste, needs no new infrastructure and can be created entirely from domestic materials.

§ First online video broadcast consumer service in 1986 via TechMate™ (per State & Federal) filings.

§ White House commendation for first online interactive video & gaming network in 1994.

§ Recipient of Mayoral proclamations, State Assembly Proclamations and Senator commendation letters.

§ Winner “Scientists Helping America” from DARPA.

§ Developed, patented & built wireless device power system.

§ Received multiple patents for the first extrusive 3D tactile surface technology for virtual, tele-present and augmented reality.

§ Developed wireless social networking technology now in use by industry.

§ Developed & patented electronic propulsion technology which superseded a previous NASA patent.

§ Founder/creator of one of the first, patented, lightest weight, lowest cost-to-manufacture, safest electric car technologies.

§ Founder of one of America’s leading green housing ventures, sponsored by Dwell Magazine and the National Association of Home-Builders.

§ Keynote Speaker: TechTextile material science convention, Las Vegas.

§ Recipient of multiple mayoral and senate proclamations.

§ Associate Speaker: National Education Conference- Chicago

§ Developed community major events facilities and logistics for Fort Mason Center.

§ Keynote speaker: Global Summit for Project Innovation National Convention.

 § Received multiple White House commendation letters from Vice President Al Gore.

 § Developed The NowHouse national home construction technology showcase home at the San Francisco Giant's Stadium. Toured by visitors from around the world and visited online by millions.

§ Facility Manager: Showplace Square commercial design and architectural resources centre as personal associate to founder, Henry Adams.

§ Founder/CEO- for venture-backed start-ups

§ Executive Director: The Family Foundation. Benefitting child, animal, medical & social issues.

§ Winner, National Award for best Producer/Director from 3D Design Magazine.

§ Producer/founder: Footstock. Bay To Breakers Finale section for world's largest race.

§ Logistics Director: San Francisco Blues Festival; America's longest run music festival.

§ Developed and designed the first touring, motion-based, portable theme park, PC-based interactive video attraction for NFL Network Tour.

§ Developed, delivered & patented first global low-bandwidth, DVD-quality internet broadcasting network and delivered the system and multiple working software packages prior to any other online video system of it’s kind. Web products and sites included: ClickMovie.com, Personal Producer, Trailer Park and others. First to develop, patent and demo peer-to-peer and particulated file media delivery. A global standard for large file delivery as shown in United States patent filings, federal records, filed records, industry reports and other documented proofs of invention. (See Firechat, Napster, Bittorrent, Kontiki, Vudu, MS Avalanche, etc.)

§ U.S. Patent awarded as “First Inventor” of iPhone™ and cell phone P2P Ad hoc multi-antenna/modem networking

§ First to develop, patent and demo mobile media device PDA form factor and architecture and to demonstrate VOD on HP IPAQ PDA. Beat Apple iPhone by 3 years prior IP. Issued and filed U.S. Patents confirmed date in previous invention date dispute.

§ First to invent, patent file, demonstrate and become patent awardee for iPhone™ wearable VR headset integrating iPhone™ into goggles

§ First to present Internet VOD to the largest film studios in Hollywood. Designed web video on demand system for one of the largest Hollywood Studios. Contracts, letters, and communication confirmed.

§ Recipient of hundreds of letters of reference and acclaim (as shown in the attached links) from industry and government leaders (Multiple administrations), Mayors (multiple administrations), Fortune 1000 leaders, Government Agency heads, Community organization executives State assemblies and many more

§ His mobile App, “Democri-C” , with help from Steve Job's office at Apple Computer, was the first refugee to-peer software in the world, in use for disaster communications and regime change worldwide. He has received multiple issued patents on the technology.

§ Created one of the first online “design-to-build” technology for modern home design and construction. Scott, his team and his system were featured in a Discovery Channel TV Series

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TELECOM: At-Sea Internet with Frickin’ Laser Beams

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TELECOM: DATA CENTER POWER ADVANTAGES OF THE FUEL CASSETTE

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ENERGY: Seawater Offers a Brand New Way to Produce Clean Energy

This works with our technology:

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Zain Charkawi
 
As the world starts to move away from using fossil fuels towards cleaner and greener forms of energy, there seems to be more and more alternatives arising from somewhat unlikely sources. For instance, scientists have just found a way to use seawater as a clean and renewable energy source. By utilizing sunlight, scientists have found that they can turn seawater into hydrogen peroxide (H202), a chemical compound that can then be used to generate electricity in fuel cells. One of the researchers responsible for this new study had this to say about their new find:
Opening quote
Utilization of solar energy as a primary energy source has been strongly demanded to reduce emissions of harmful and/or greenhouse gases produced by burning fossil fuels. However, large fluctuation of solar energy depending on the length of the daytime is a serious problem. To utilize solar energy in the night time, solar energy should be stored in the form of chemical energy and used as a fuel to produce electricity
Closing quote
Some may be asking why seawater? Couldn't freshwater work just as well? The answer to that is a firm "no," as gaseous hydrogen production from pure water has a lower solar energy conversion and turns out to be much more difficult to store and transport. For a comparison, one of the tests conducted showed that after 24 hrs, the H202 concentration in seawater reached 48 millimolar; the concentration in pure water only reached 2 millimolar. Researchers found that the negatively charged chlorine in the seawater was responsible for why seawater is such an effective method. The process works using something called a photocatalytic method, one of the first techniques to make H202 production a legitimate option, seeing as how other ways of making H202 requires a good deal of energy as well. This process takes a new photoelectrochemical cell developed to make H202 when the sun shines on the photocatalyst, which then takes in photons and begins certain chemical reactions, essentially creating H202. Though the researchers say they are currently planning to develop a way for low cost and large scale production of H202 of seawater, the process of creating energy still isn't quite as efficient as other methods of producing solar power. However, this is certainly another big step forward as the world moves away from fossil fuels and closer to greener energy sources.
Science
Technology
Science News
 

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MEDIA: INTERNET VIDEO AND MEDIA DISTRIBUTION TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS

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Internet Music and Video Distribution, Video-On-Demand (VOD)

During his work on the development of synthetic virtual environments, later known as “virtual reality”, Scott found that the quality of the image data, in VR, was limited by the network. So, he set out to create photo-real network-capable video. This led him to develop, launch and commercialize the world’s First full-screen, full-color, 30 FPS, internet-distributed video service: ClickMovie.com

SEE THIS VIDEO: HTTP://WWW.VIMEO.COM/126024571

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The technology is called WEB-VOD (Video-on-demand). While two different people have had a long standing disagreement about who invented torrents, The U.S. Government, industry researchers and documented historical facts have resolved that issue in favor of Scott. Many people first think of torrents as a piracy tool. That was never what Scott, and his team, created the technology for. While a pencil can be used to write beautiful poetry, it can also be used to poke someones eye out. The pencil was created as a communications tool. It was not made for poking eyes out. Every technology, or tool, could be used by bad people to do bad things. Please don't use torrents for crimes. Use them for what they were made for: infrastructure cost savings, improved communications, self-repairing networks, emergency communications, security, and network efficiency. Don't use torrents for crime, please!

8 Legal Uses For BitTorrent: You’d Be Surprised

To many people, BitTorrent is synonymous with piracy. This isn’t true — BitTorrent is certainly used for piracy, but it’s also used for many legal things. If we banned BitTorrent tomorrow and removed it from the Internet, many organizations, businesses, and content creators would have to scramble to replace it. Like HTTP, which your browser uses to communicate with websites, BitTorrent is just a protocol. You could use your browser to download pirated content, just as you could use a BitTorrent client to download pirated content, but that isn’t the only possible use. Sure, let’s face it — BitTorrent is probably primarily used for downloading unauthorized content. But that’s far from its only use, and the protocol still has a lot of value to people who don’t pirate.

Game Updates & Downloads

Blizzard Entertainment uses its own BitTorrent client to download World of Warcraft, Starcraft II, and Diablo III. When you purchase one of these games and download it, you’re actually just downloading a BitTorrent client that will do the rest of the work. When an update is available, the BitTorrent client built into the game’s launcher automatically downloads it for you. This allows Blizzard to save money on bandwidth and offer faster download speeds to its many players. Players can choose whether they want to contribute their upload bandwidth to speed things up for other people.

Facebook and Twitter  Use BitTorrent Internally

Facebook and Twitter both use BitTorrent internally to move files around. Ars Technica revealed Facebook’s usage of BitTorrent:
Moving a 1.5GB binary blob to countless servers is a non-trivial technical challenge. After exploring several solutions, Facebook came up with the idea of using BitTorrent, the popular peer-to-peer file sharing protocol. BitTorrent is very good at propagating large files over a large number of different servers.
BitTorrent is designed to distribute large files to multiple different computers, allowing each system to contribute some of its own bandwidth to speed up the process. This makes it useful for any situation where you want to transfer large files as fast as possible in a scalable way. bittorrent-facebook

The Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is a non-profit organization that preserves content and makes it downloadable on the Internet. It’s known for its Wayback Machine, which stores copies of websites and allows you to go back in time and relive the past. The organization also offers a huge archive of public domain media — recordings of live concerts, eBooks, old movies and TV shows, and other audio recordings. The Internet Archive recommends people use BitTorrent to download its content, as it’s the fastest method and allows the non-profit organization to save on bandwidth costs. internet-archive-torrents

Government Uses

In 2010, the UK government released several large data sets showing how public money was being spent. To make these available, they offered them via BitTorrent. This allowed the government to save on bandwidth costs. And, let’s face it — BitTorrent is also the fastest way to make such documents available to the largest number of people possible. NASA has also used BitTorrent to make a 2.9GB picture of the Earth available. nasa-blue-marble

File Syncing With BitTorrent Sync

BitTorrent, Inc. — the company behind BitTorrent — recently released BitTorrent Sync. BitTorrent Sync works differently from standard BitTorrent clients. it’s entirely private — you install the client, choose one or more folders to share, and then link it up with other computers. Files anyone places in their copy of the shared folder are all automatically synced with all other copies of the shared folders. In this way, BitTorrent Sync is a lot like Dropbox. Unlike Dropbox, it doesn’t store your files in a centralized server online — it just syncs them between computers you own or computers your friends own. This means that it offers easy file sharing over the Internet and, unlike Dropbox, you can sync an unlimited number of files as long as you have the space on your computers for them. BitTorrent Sync could be used to share pirated content, but that would be silly when pirated content is available in so many public BitTorrent streams. It’s a great way to roll your own Dropbox-like service and share files across the Internet without trusting them to a central server or being limited by the size of your cloud storage account. bittorrent syncapp

Linux ISOs

If you’re familiar with BitTorrent, you’ll know that BitTorrent users always say they’re downloading “Linux ISOs” as a joke when they’re actually downloading pirated content. This may be a common joke, but it’s also a good excuse — Linux ISOs are a common use for BitTorrent. Whether you’re downloading the latest release of Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, or any Linux distribution, there’s a good chance you’re getting it via BitTorrent. These distributions offer themselves for free to everyone and they’re often 1 GB or larger. BitTorrent can help them save on bandwidth costs and speed up downloads.

Distributing Videos and Music

If you want to make media available — perhaps you’ve produced a documentary and want to release it for free or you’re a band that wants to release free music as a promotion — BitTorrent is one of the best ways to do it. If you hosted the files yourself, you’d have to pay for a lot of bandwidth. If you make the files available via BitTorrent, you’d save a lot of bandwidth by letting your fans contribute their bandwidth as they downloaded your content. You’d also receive press just for making your files available via BitTorrent. The official BitTorrent website has a list of “bundles” of music and videos artists make available to hook fans, just as the radio was — and still is — used to offer free music to large number of people in hopes that they’ll attend live shows and buy albums. bittorrent-bundles

Distributing Any Large Data

BitTorrent is a great way to distribute any large chunk of data as fast as possible, saving money on bandwidth. In addition to all the uses above, BitTorrent has been used to share large scientific data sets with anyone interested. Any large chunk of data that’s free for anyone to access can be distributed publically with BitTorrent.

So What Does This Tell Us About BitTorrent?

If we look at the examples above, we can see that BitTorrent is very useful in several situations:
  • Public distribution of data that’s free for anyone to access. Whether it’s public domain videos, Linux ISOs, scientific data sets, or high-resolution pictures of the Earth, BitTorrent is an effective way to distribute the content. Even Blizzard doesn’t care if people use its BItTorrent clients to download its game files — they have to authenticate online before they can play the games, so Blizzard is happy to provide its game files to anyone.
  • Private distribution of data among a few trusted sources. Whether it’s Facebook and Twitter using BitTorrent to update their servers or average people using BitTorrent Sync to move their personal data back and forth between their computers, BitTorrent is a fast way to leverage multiple computers’ Internet connections and quickly sync data.

BitTorrent is a tool, and a particularly useful one — that’s why it’s so widely used for piracy. There was piracy before BitTorrent and there would be piracy after BitTorrent if BitTorrent died tomorrow. BitTorrent also allows the Internet to be more participatory, enabling average people to share their files without paying for massive amounts of bandwidth and contribute their own bandwidth to share other people’s files. If you’re looking for more examples, check out the “Does BitTorrent Equal Piracy?” website, set up by BitTorrent, Inc. bittorrent-etsy[4]

Do you use BitTorrent for other legal purposes?


 

Scott and his Team have received numerous seminal patent awards, by the U.S. Government, for the invention, and first delivery of high def, full color, full-screen movies on the internet. Scott developed the SONY VOD system and is acknowledged in Sony's patent filings.

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