Tag - inventions

Entries feed - Comments feed

-

INFO: The Very First "Google"?

INVENTING THE FUTURE.png

Who made the first "Google"? Let's Take A Look:

 

UNIFREE(TM) and TECH-Mate(TM) are said, by many legal experts, to have been the "very first Google" that Tom Perkins and Larry Page came and looked at before going off to launch their own version of a search engine that became a free-services aggregation provider...

___________

The original Unifree Search Engine and free-services online tool existed before Google was even created and offered 100% of the same services Google later offered:

UNIFREE

SEARCH: [_______________________________________________________________]


100% of the same services...years before Google existed...reviewed by the founders of Google...with NDA's, federal patent records, emails, videos and phone calls proving the "who-did-it-first" arguement

About:

TECHMATE and Unifree were created by Scott Douglas Redmond in San Francisco as an expansion of his work on virtual reality networks. His, and his Team’s, work has continued, and patents have continued to issue, up to today. UNIFREE was launched on the web and has always operated as an on-line search engine and search web services offering. Previously filed patents and federal records prove pre-existence of the technology, company and website prior to the existence of Google. Larry Page met Scott at Stanford University and in Bay Area technology club meetings. As the name implies, UNIFREE is a collection of UNIVERSALLY FREE on-line services such as mail, video, search, social networking, messaging, VOIP, etc., UNIVERSALLY available for the world population integrated across a common front end. Unifree is a web-site service offering based around a main launch-page which, exactly like the later “Google”, offers all of the free on-line services that Google offers today, with a particular emphasis on on-line media. The United States Patent Office Trademark filings and records describe the free UNIFREE online services center in a manner which many observers feel describes the LATER creation of Google.

The State of California confirms that UNIFREE LLC existed with a California Entity Number as of 11/12/1997 at Plaintiffs incubator address in San Francisco, CA. The public interest ranking algorithm that Plaintiffs created to automatically determine which links to services would be ranked above others on the home page was called “mombot” ™ . It was a robotic formula which acted as the internet mom for your web experiences, just as Google does today. Unifree was fully operational on the world wide web far earlier than Google existed. On February 4, 1998 Scott executed a Non-Disclosure Business Partnership development agreement with Yahoo, inc. for UNIFREE partnership and acquisition discussions, and engaged in numerous time-stamped email communications with funding inquiries and fishing expedition inquiries from Google venture capital investors.

Scott received White House commendation letters, on White House letterhead, for his work on these social networks.

Scott and UNIFREE were featured on a nationally broadcast hour long TV show on FOX discussing the technology. The name Google was formally incorporated on September 4, 1998 at girlfriend Susan Wojcicki‘s apartment in Menlo Park, California. The first patent filed under the name “Google Inc.” was filed on August 31, 1999. This patent, filed by Siu-Leong Iu, Malcom Davis, Hui Luo, Yun-Ting Lin, Guillaume Mercier, and Kobad Bugwadia, is titled “Watermarking System and Methodology for Digital Multimedia Content” and is the earliest patent filing under the assignee name “Google Inc.”12][13].

Our associate Rajeev Motwani worked with early Google staff on this watermarking technology which was a way to track users activities without their knowledge. The social media aspect of Plaintiff’s internet engine was deployed as the TECHMATE ™ social network long before the Google founders had even met each other. Techmate was advertised in Bay Area newspaper display advertising and certified by the State of California in filed public records with the Secretary of State on March 1, 1987. Did Scott and his team invent Google? Did the founders of Google simply copy something from Plaintiff and add a weird name to it?

SCREEN SHOT FROM 1996:

 

google.png 

Does Larry Page at Google Steal Technology For Google? The New York Times Thinks So:

 

How Larry Page’s Obsessions Became Google’s Business

한국어로 읽기 Read in Korean

By CONOR DOUGHERTY

Photo

Credit Minh Uong/The New York Times

Three years ago, Charles Chase, an engineer who manages Lockheed Martin’s nuclear fusion program, was sitting on a white leather couch at Google’s Solve for X conference when a man he had never met knelt down to talk to him.

They spent 20 minutes discussing how much time, money and technology separated humanity from a sustainable fusion reaction — that is, how to produce clean energy by mimicking the sun’s power — before Mr. Chase thought to ask the man his name.

“I’m Larry Page,” the man said. He realized he had been talking to Google’s billionaire co-founder and chief executive.

“He didn’t have any sort of pretension like he shouldn’t be talking to me or ‘Don’t you know who you’re talking to?’” Mr. Chase said. “We just talked.”

Continue reading the main story

 

Larry Page is not a typical chief executive, and in many of the most visible ways, he is not a C.E.O. at all. Corporate leaders tend to spend a good deal of time talking at investor conferences or introducing new products on auditorium stages. Mr. Page, who is 42, has not been on an earnings call since 2013, and the best way to find him at Google I/O — an annual gathering where the company unveils new products — is to ignore the main stage and follow the scrum of fans and autograph seekers who mob him in the moments he steps outside closed doors.

Photo

A prototype for a car Google is developing. Credit Google

But just because he has faded from public view does not mean he is a recluse. He is a regular at robotics conferences and intellectual gatherings like TED. Scientists say he is a good bet to attend Google’s various academic gatherings, like Solve for X and Sci Foo Camp, where he can be found having casual conversations about technology or giving advice to entrepreneurs.

Mr. Page is hardly the first Silicon Valley chief with a case of intellectual wanderlust, but unlike most of his peers, he has invested far beyond his company’s core business and in many ways has made it a reflection of his personal fascinations.

He intends to push even further with Alphabet, a holding company that separates Google’s various cash-rich advertising businesses from the list of speculative projects like self-driving cars that capture the imagination but do not make much money. Alphabet companies and investments span disciplines from biotechnology to energy generation to space travel to artificial intelligence to urban planning.

Investors will get a good look at the scope of those ambitions on Feb. 1, when the company, in its fourth-quarter earnings report, will disclose for the first time the costs and income of the collection of projects outside of Google’s core business.

As chief executive of Alphabet, Mr. Page is tasked with figuring how to spin Google’s billions in advertising profits into new companies and industries. When he announced the reorganization last summer, he said that he and Sergey Brin, Google’s other founder, would do this by finding new people and technologies to invest in, while at the same time slimming down Google — now called Google Inc., a subsidiary of Alphabet — so their leaders would have more autonomy.

Photo

Sundar Pichai, chief of Google Inc. Credit Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

“In general, our model is to have a strong C.E.O. who runs each business, with Sergey and me in service to them as needed,” Mr. Page wrote in a letter to investors. He said that he and Mr. Brin would be responsible for picking those chief executives, monitoring their progress and determining their pay.

Google’s day-to-day management was left to Sundar Pichai, the company’s new chief executive. His job will not be about preventing cancer or launching rocket ships, but to keep Google’s advertising machine humming, to keep innovating in emerging areas like machine learning and virtual reality — all while steering the company through a thicket of regulatory troubles that could drag on for years.

Mr. Page’s new role is part talent scout and part technology visionary. He still has to find the chief executives of many of the other Alphabet businesses.

And he has said on several occasions that he spends a good deal of time researching new technologies, focusing on what kind of financial or logistic hurdles stand in the way of them being invented or carried out.

His presence at technology events, while just a sliver of his time, is indicative of a giant idea-scouting mission that has in some sense been going on for years but is now Mr. Page’s main job.

Photo

Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google, wearing Google Glass. Credit Carlo Allegri/Reuters

In the investor letter, he put it this way: “Sergey and I are seriously in the business of starting new things.”

An Interest in Cool Things

Mr. Page has always had a wide range of interests. As an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, he worked on solar cars, music synthesizers and once proposed that the school build a tram through campus. He arrived at Stanford’s computer science doctorate program in 1995, and had a list of initial research ideas, including self-driving cars and using the web’s many hyperlinks to improve Internet search. His thesis adviser, Terry Winograd, steered him toward search.

“Even before he came to Stanford he was interested in cool technical things that could be done,” Mr. Winograd said. “What makes something interesting for him is a big technical challenge. It’s not so much where it’s headed but what the ride is like.”

Inside Google, Mr. Page is known for asking a lot of questions about how people do their jobs and challenging their assumptions about why things are as they are. In an interview at the Fortune Global Forum last year, Mr. Page said he enjoyed talking to people who ran the company’s data centers.

“I ask them, like, ‘How does the transformer work?’ ‘How does the power come in?’ ‘What do we pay for that?’” he said. “And I’m thinking about it kind of both as an entrepreneur and as a business person. And I’m thinking ‘What are those opportunities?’”

Photo

LinkNYC Wi-Fi consoles, a product of Sidewalk Labs, a company owned by Google. Credit Cole Wilson for The New York Times

Another question he likes to ask: “Why can’t this be bigger?”

Mr. Page declined multiple requests for comment, and many of the people who spoke about him requested anonymity because they were not supposed to talk about internal company matters.

Many former Google employees who have worked directly with Mr. Page said his managerial modus operandi was to take new technologies or product ideas and generalize them to as many areas as possible. Why can’t Google Now, Google’s predictive search tool, be used to predict everything about a person’s life? Why create a portal to shop for insurance when you can create a portal to shop for every product in the world?

But corporate success means corporate sprawl, and recently Google has seen a number of engineers and others leave for younger rivals like Facebook and start-ups like Uber. Mr. Page has made personal appeals to some of them, and, at least in a few recent cases, has said he is worried that the company has become a difficult place for entrepreneurs, according to people who have met with him.

Part of Mr. Page’s pitch included emphasizing how dedicated he was to “moonshots” like interplanetary travel, or offering employees time and money to pursue new projects of their own. By breaking Google into Alphabet, Mr. Page is hoping to make it a more welcoming home for employees to build new businesses, as well as for potential acquisition targets.

It will also rid his office of the kind of dull-but-necessary annoyances of running a major corporation. Several recently departed Google staff members said that as chief executive of Google, Mr. Page had found himself in the middle of various turf wars, like how to integrate Google Plus, the company’s struggling social media effort, with other products like YouTube, or where to put Google Now, which resided in the Android team but was moved to the search group.

 
What Is Separated Under Alphabet?
  • Google: search, advertising, maps, YouTube and Android.
  • Calico, an anti-aging biotech company
  • Sidewalk, a company focused on smart cities
  • Nest, a maker of Internet-connected devices for the home
  • Fiber, high-speed Internet service in a number of American cities
  • Investment arms, such as Google Ventures and Google Capital
  • Incubator projects, such as Google X, which is developing self-driving cars and delivery drones

Such disputes are a big reason Mr. Page had been shedding managerial duties and delegating the bulk of his product oversight to Mr. Pichai, these people said. In a 2014 memo to the company announcing Mr. Pichai’s promotion to product chief, Mr. Page said the move would allow him to “focus on the bigger picture” at Google and have more time to get the company’s next generation of big bets off the ground.

People who have worked with Mr. Page say that he tries to guard his calendar, avoiding back-to-back meetings and leaving time to read, research and see new technologies that interest him.

Given that he is worth in the neighborhood of $40 billion and created the world’s most famous website, Mr. Page has the tendency to attract a crowd when he attends technology events. At last year’s Darpa Robotics Challenge, he was trailed closely by a handler who at times acted as a buffer between Mr. Page and would-be cellphone photographers. That commotion could annoy anyone, but it is particularly troubling for Mr. Page, who, because of damaged vocal cords, speaks just above a whisper and sometimes uses a microphone in small meetings.

At home in Palo Alto, Mr. Page tries to have the most normal life possible, driving his children to school or taking his family to local street fairs, according to people who know him or have seen him at such events.

And at Google, even events that are decidedly not normal aspire to a kind of casualness. Take the Camp, an exclusive and secretive event that Google holds at a resort in Sicily and where invitees have included Elon Musk, the chief executive of Tesla Motors and SpaceX, Lloyd C. Blankfein, the chief executive of Goldman Sachs, and Tory Burch, the fashion designer.

Photo

A Project Loon balloon. Credit Google

One attendee, who asked to remain anonymous because guests were not supposed to discuss the gathering, recalls being surprised by how much time Mr. Page spent with his children.

In public remarks, Mr. Page has said how important his father, Carl V. Page, a computer science professor at Michigan State University who died in 1996, was to his choice of career.

“My dad was really interested in technology,” Mr. Page said at Google I/O in 2013, the last time he took the stage at the event. “He actually drove me and my family all the way across the country to go to a robotics conference. And then we got there and he thought it was so important that his young son go to the conference, one of the few times I’ve seen him really argue with someone to get in someone underage successfully into the conference, and that was me.”

People who work with Mr. Page or have spoken with him at conferences say he tries his best to blend in, and, for the most part, the smaller groups of handpicked attendees at Google’s academic and science gatherings, tend to treat him like a peer.

The scope of his curiosity was apparent at Sci Foo Camp, an annual invitation-only conference that is sponsored by Google, O’Reilly Media and Digital Science.

Photo

A Nest thermostat.

The largely unstructured “unconference” begins when each of its attendees — an eclectic batch of astronomers, psychologists, physicists and others — write something that interests them on a small card and then paste it to a communal wall. Those notes become the basis for breakout talks on topics like scientific ethics or artificial intelligence.

The last conference was held during a weekend in June on Google’s Mountain View, Calif., campus, and Mr. Page was there for most of it. He did not host or give a speech, but mingled and went to talks, just like everyone else. That impressed investors and computer scientists who did not expect to see so much of him, but researchers who had come from outside Silicon Valley barely noticed.

“I have a vague memory that some founder type person was walking through the crowd,” said Josh Peek, an assistant astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore.

Another benefit of these gatherings for the reserved Mr. Page is that they are mostly closed to the news media.

A Forward Thinker

When Mr. Page does talk in public, he tends to focus on optimistic pronouncements about the future and Google’s desire to help humanity. Asked about current issues, like how mobile apps are challenging the web or how ad blockers are affecting Google’s business, he tends to dismiss it with something like, “People have been talking about that for a long time.”

Photo

A contact lens with a wireless chip. Credit Google

Lately, he has talked more about his belief that for-profit companies can be a force for social good and change. During a 2014 interview with Charlie Rose, Mr. Page said that instead of a nonprofit or philanthropic organization, he would rather leave his money to an entrepreneur like Mr. Musk.

Larry Page: Where's Google going next? Video by TED

Of course, for every statement Mr. Page makes about Alphabet’s technocorporate benevolence, you can find many competitors and privacy advocates holding their noses in disgust. Technology companies like Yelp have accused the company of acting like a brutal monopolist that is using the dominance of its search engine to steer consumers toward Google services, even if that means giving the customers inferior information.

Financially speaking, Mr. Page is leaving his chief executive job at Google at a time when things could not be better. The company’s revenue continues to grow about 20 percent a year, an impressive figure for any business, but particularly so for one that is on pace to generate approximately $60 billion this year.

In fact, the company’s main business issue seems to be that it is doing too well. Google is facing antitrust charges in Europe, along with investigations in Europe and the United States. Those issues are now mostly Mr. Pichai’s to worry about, as Mr. Page is out looking for the next big thing.

It is hard to imagine how even the most ambitious person could hope to revolutionize so many industries. And Mr. Page, no matter how smart, cannot possibly be an expert in every area Alphabet wants to touch.

His method is not overly technical. Instead, he tends to focus on how to make a sizable business out of whatever problem this or that technology might solve. Leslie Dewan, a nuclear engineer who founded a company that is trying to generate cheap electricity from nuclear waste, also had a brief conversation with Mr. Page at the Solve For X conference.

She said he questioned her on things like modular manufacturing and how to find the right employees.

“He doesn’t have a nuclear background, but he knew the right questions to ask,” said Dr. Dewan, chief executive of Transatomic Power. “‘Have you thought about approaching the manufacturing in this way?’ ‘Have you thought about the vertical integration of the company in this way?’ ‘Have you thought about training the work force this way?’ They weren’t nuclear physics questions, but they were extremely thoughtful ways to think about how we could structure the business.”

Dr. Dewan said Mr. Page even gave her an idea for a new market opportunity that she had not thought of. Asked to be more specific, she refused. The idea was too good to share.

Doris Burke contributed reporting from New York.

Trying to interview Google’s chief executive can feel ... emasculating. Conor Dougherty provides a look in Times Insider at how he covers the company and its elusive chief, Larry Page.

-----

So...does Google steal much of it's technology?

7588728_orig-618x500.png

Kinda' looks like it. Google's attorney ran the patent office while Google controlled the White House in the Obama Administration and Google spent the largest amount of money in history to try to force laws into being to outlaw indiependent American inventors.

 

 

Share

MANAGEMENT: BAY TO BREAKERS "FOOTSTOCK" MULTI-YEAR MANAGEMENT PROJECT

As Producer Scott delivered an instant temporary city for 200,000+ people, year-after-year...

BTBSTAGE.jpg

Bay To Breakers “Footstock” Production

We created the first 200,000+ person post-race sports-city and ran logistics for that event for the “World’s Largest Sports Event, The Bay To Breakers.” as Producer; contracted for design, development and construction of a 1,200,000 square foot temporary “City”, with all of the functions required to keep people safe and functional, for hundreds of thousands of people.

     http://www.vimeo.com/125390567

 
GALLERY OF PROJECT IMAGES:
 

Share

-

ENERGY: TOP MODERN ENERGY SOLUTION

howafuelcellworks.gif

THE TOP MODERN ENERGY SOLUTION IN THE WORLD!

Use solar, hydrogen, battery, petrol and other technologies in one system. This is your "forever energy solution". Award-winning, patented, Congressionally acclaimed, working energy solutions. Energy With Attitude TM The first company in the mobile fuel cell space. The originators of the mobile fuel cell power pack. "GREAT SCOTT!" TAKE A LOOK AT THIS VIDEO AND THEN CONTACT US TO SEE HOW TO MAKE YOUR FCV CAR FUEL, AT HOME, AND POWER YOUR CAR FOR TWO THOUSAND MILES WITHOUT HUNTING FOR A FUEL STATION: 

CLICK TO WATCH OR DOWNLOAD VIDEO >> : toyota fuel cell.mp4
 
OUR TECHNOLOGY NOW MATES TO, AND RANGE-EXTENDS, ANY HONDA, TOYOTA, FORD, BMW, HYUNDAI, KIA, MERCEDES, AND OTHER FUEL CELL VEHICLE, ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD! ADD THOUSANDS OF MILES OF RANGE AND NEVER HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT HUNTING FOR A FUEL STATION AGAIN!
Picture
 
Is it clean and non-toxic? You can use solar, wind, bio-waste, geo-thermal, water and more, to generate free, or low cost, energy from domestic resources. Make your energy go farther, more safely, than any competing solution. 
 

 
THE LIM-PACTM POWER PACK BEATS EVERYTHING ON THE MARKET!  Organic-based battery, power source and fuel production in one system, scalable from pocket-size to freight-train size. In use, around the world, by NASA, all branches of the armed forces, the medical industry, camping industries and organizations in every country. Patented, Fuel Cell-based, Clean, Efficient, Non-toxic, Domestic sourced, Instant recharge, Sustainable, Non-explosive, Low Cost, Light-weight, Longer duration, Self-repairing, Longer-range; Power from Water, Solar and Organic Waste Materials.
  • Lasts longer than any other commercial battery.
  • Runs safer than any other commercial battery.
  • Gives you more range, in mobile, vehicle and transport systems, than any other commercial battery.
  • Can be recharged, or powered, by more sustainable sources, than any other commercial battery.
  • Can use more domestic resources than any other commercial battery.
Nothing on Earth can offer you these advantages:
  • One little cube can power your phone, your car, your house, your RV or your city!
  • Fuel storage and energy output in one little blue square.
  • Zero-issue about whether or not "it works": Featuring technology now in use, and proven by: NASA, The Pentagon, The Navy Seals, and the Olympics.
  • Fuelled by, either: water, and/or solar and/or or any organic material.
  • Stack them up for power, convenience and customization. Power the smallest, and the biggest, products that need power.
  • Safe, non-toxic, organic, sustainable, efficient, stackable, modular, clean, dependable, self repairing, mobile, easy, instant re-charge.
  • Best power-to-weight-to-factory cost ratio in the world.
  • You can make power at home, or pick up more fuel from millions of locations you can locate with a mobile App.
  • No carcinogenic fumes, like competing energy solutions.
  • Modular system fits every physical space foot-print.
  • No self-ignition, like competing solutions.
  • All materials available inside your own national borders so it does not create a national security threat, like other solutions.
  • Doubles the value of your existing wind, solar or geothermal power systems.
  • The waste material is just drinkable water; which can be recycled.
  • Tens of thousands of examples of the technology, now in use, via land, sea, air and space.
  • Can be easily manufactured at low cost with simple factory systems already on-line.
  • Protected by the top mobile energy patent suite of issued patents, and multiple pending patents, in this market, in the world.
- One Cube - Every Power Need  - Now featuring some of the most potent competitor protection in the world. Competitors spent over TWO BILLION dollars trying to halt this technology with lobbying, shills, "doubt articles" and nay-saying. Many of them failed, went out of business, and were indicted for misbehaviours. After all that, we are still around, they are failing, and we now have government support globally, and dramatically increasing demand for our technology. - Now seeking licensing and manufacturing partners. Over 100 factories now capable of contracting for your order. - Consumers: Contact your Best Buy, Radio Shack, REI, Target, Walmart, Safeway, Walgreens, Piggley Wiggly, Rite Aid, or other retailer, and ask them to place a manufacturing order, with us, for Lim-Pac's. We do not sell direct-to-consumer, but ask your local retailer to place an order with us, so you can conveniently buy Lim-Pac's in your neighbourhood . We are recipients of federal and industry commendations, federal grants, historical patents, federal contracts, and U.S. Congressional commendation in the Federal Register, for creating of this technology. Our system is an instant-swap/recharge battery that runs longer than almost any other battery, can use almost any one of over 3000 chemical configurations, leaves only drinkable water as it’s waste, needs no new infrastructure and can be created entirely from domestic materials. NO NEW INFRASTRUCTURE COSTS ARE REQUIRED. THE INFRASTRUCTURE FOR LIM-PAC IS ALREADY IN PLACE IN YOUR COUNTRY! DOUBLE THE RANGE OF YOUR ELECTRIC OR HYBRID VEHICLE. QUADRUPLE THE USE TIME OF YOUR DEVICE WITHOUT EXPOSING YOURSELF TO DANGEROUS TOXINS.  ENSURE YOUR DOMESTIC SECURITY!!!  ARE ALL THE SOURCES, OF YOUR OTHER ENERGY OPTIONS, NOW WAR-ZONES? BRING ENERGY HOME. USE LIM-PAC'S TO GET POWERED UP, WITHIN YOUR NATIONAL BORDERS. OVER 220 MILLION LOCATIONS TO RE-CHARGE YOUR LIM-PAC EXIST TODAY, INCLUDING YOUR HOME OR OFFICE! SEE SOME OF OUR ISSUED PATENTS. (CLICK HERE) Our patented technology scales to any size to provide the best power solutions for: - Portable Power- Electronics, Emergency, Mobile - Vehicle Power- EV, CNG, Hybrid, RV, Tactical - Stationary Power- Community, Field Unit, Back-up, Remote Housing Why Is This Better?: - Longer Vehicle Range Than Any Other Solution. - Longer Electronic Device Operation Than Any Other Solution. - Less Carcinogenic Than Any Other Solution. - Faster Recharge Than Any Other Solution. - Provides Greater National Security Than Any Other Solution. - Easier To Produce And Manufacture Domestically Than Any Other Solution. - Reduces The Weight, Decreases The Cost And Increases The Range Of EV's Better Than Any Other Solution. - More Worldwide Recharge/Refuel Locations Than Any Other Solution. - Eliminates The Need For Extension Cords More Than Any Other Solution. - Able To Produce More Power From A Clean Grid Than Any Other Solution. - Easier To Glass-Encapsulate, To Avoid Accidents, Than Any Other Solution. - Better Able To Load-Balance Energy Demands Than Any Other Solution. - Least Toxic Fuel Than Any Other Solution. - Better Able To Provide Power From Within National Borders Than Any Other Solution. - Exceeds The Metrics Of All Competing Energy Solutions. - Our Patents Cover Over 3000 Energy Storage Chemistries. - And Many More Reasons... Tested globally in thousands of test deployments, millions of miles of auto use and in space. We license and design portable power, electric vehicle power and range extenders. We are a developer of clean, green, safe, recyclable energy solutions. We hold one of the premier patent portfolios for in-house engineered energy storage. We are an expert in time-shifted energy deployment.
Picture
 
Picture
 
Picture
 
Picture
 
 

 
Eliminates the extension cord. Featuring: The safest chemical energy storage, via our glass encapsulation technology, for over 3000+ different energy storage compounds Turn Toxic Coal Ashe into Clean Energy Storage material using our patented technology. Find out about our solution to turn waste "Powder into Power"! Ask us about licensing or partnering. 
 
 

Picture
 
 

 
SUPPORTED BY THE U.S.CONGRESS, THE PUBLIC AND INDUSTRY -
Picture
 
 

 

Clean, mobile, long-lasting, local power.

Picture

 
The energy density of even today's most extreme batteries is less than that of our technology. In other words: there is no other battery solution on the market today that can beat the patented system energy density capability and features. Our systems can deploy end-to-end, zero-GHG, clean, SAFE, energy paths without the use of "dirty power" sources. Our automotive technology eliminates the need to get stuck sitting around in "out-in-the-sticks" towns, staring at the ground, waiting for your car to charge. The US Department of Energy has released its final report that collected data from more than 180 fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) over a six year period from 2005–2011. Within this period the vehicles made more than 500,000 trips and travelled more than 3.6 million miles, implementing more than 33,000 fill-ups at refuelling stations across the USA. The project found that these vehicles achieved more than twice the efficiency of today’s gasoline vehicles with refuelling times of five minutes average. The report comes as the world’s major auto-makers prepare to commercially deploy FCEV from as early as next year and is a positive reminder of the benefits the technology can offer. Our technology includes patent-protected glass-encapsulation technology which prevents solvents and moisture from degrading the energy storage materials. A leader in innovation and the delivering of the key solution for reducing dependence on foreign oil; Our engineers are the inventors of patented hot-swap transportable energy storage, the Fuel Cassettes®; Endless-EV™ range-extenders, electric vehicle power plants, and gas station-pumpable encapsulation bead storage compounds. We deploy proprietary solar, inductive, wind, fuel cell and battery hybridization which are technologies that have been proven for decades by NASA, the Department of Defense, the aerospace industry, Federal energy agencies and in universities around the world. Power resources for:  Homes, offices, special events, hosting centers, portable soldier power, rack-mount markets, cell tower back-up, home power, forklift power, portable generators, boating power, camping power, portable electronics, aircraft power, neighborhood power, co-generation power, solar panel intermittency elimination, wind intermittency elimination, and back-up power. Winner: Congressional commendation & federal grant award. Awardee: Multiple issued U.S. patents. We hold patents on all core technology disclosed on this website. Be prepared for any disaster with our power technology.

Why Does Elon Musk Spend So Much Time Sabotaging and Nay-Saying Hydrogen? Take A Look at This:
Countering_the_anti-hydrogen_trolls_and_shills_1-21.pdf

 

Share