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OPPORTUNITY: The Innovation Factory Redux

OPPORTUNITY: The Innovation Factory Redux

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OPPORTUNITY: The Innovation Factory Redux

You can invest in our growth. You finance one of these new facilities and you get a percentage of the profits.

Sponsor this auxiliary-expansion project and reap the rewards of a percentage of all of the IP profits from the facility that you sponsor. Be part of an actual "idea and product factory"!

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BE PART OF:

  • 50 engineers and development specialists
  • 10,000 square feet of the finest pre-volume engineering and build shops in the world
  • At least one new invention filed with the U.S. Government every three days
  • The finest CNC, lith, machining, sintering, stereolith, shop equipment
  • Multiple government contracts engaged at all times
  • The greatest showcase of bleeding edge prototypes for manufacturing partnerships
  • Faster and better G&A than any larger competitor
  • A record-breaking volume of patents, fully operational pre-volume units and engineering plans

CONTACT US to inquire about co-sponsoring an Innovation Factory Redux

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SHOP SHOTS FROM SOME OF SCOTT'S SHOP SPACES:

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HELP POWER A TEAM OF THE BEST AND THE BRIGHTEST CREATORS IN THE WORLD:

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TELECOM: LIGHT-CASTING EVEN WORKS IN OUTER SPACE

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Inquire about acquiring the issued mobile device patents on this technology

SCOTT'S PATENTED LIGHT-CASTING(TM) EVEN WORKS IN OUTER SPACE

THE INTERNET: POWERED BY LIGHT!

In 1977, a group of technicians and engineers in San Francisco, California went up on top of a mountain in the middle of San Francisco, named Twin Peaks, and broadcast the internet across all of San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley in Northern California. They did not use wires or radio waves. They used light.

Entrepreneur and technologist Scott Douglas Redmond ( http://www.scottdouglasredmond.com/ ) , and his team of brilliant engineers rigged up a system on the mountain designed to save time and money, but they soon discovered other advantages. The city of San Francisco gave him the mountain for nearly a week, during which he received a mayoral proclamation and the donation of an entire radio station and the main laser used in Star Wars for special effects.

What happens when you give a legion of engineers a whole mountain in the middle of San Francisco?

…They beam light, audio and video to over two million people….just for fun!

Take 148 crew, one mountain, a city center with 7 million people around it and more candle-power than many small cities have, and you get the first outdoor urban light networked experience for a whole city!

The event was viewed by millions but 1000 people interacted with it on the first public web, connected by light

 

You could see the event, hear the event on the radio, transduce audio from the light and transduce basic video from the light. It was one of the first mass broadcasts using light as the delivery platform. If you were close enough, you could feel the sound. Satellites could see the event. Mr. Redmond has now taken this technology to consumer pockets. He has built mini versions of his Lightcaster and has been issued multiple patents by the U.S. Government on cell phones networked by light. Redmond has offered the patents, engineering and manufacturing rights to any manufacturer who wishes to deliver the “lightphone” to the volume consumer market.

WAVEY GRAVY – THE MC IN THE FILM: “WOODSTOCK”, Keeping the crew fired up at one of the Twin Peaks lightcasting events


 

This kind of internet-by-light now has a name. It is often called Light-Fi or Li-Fi

Li-Fi (Light Fidelity) is a bidirectional, high speed and fully networked wireless communication technology similar to Wi-Fi. The term was coined by Harald Haas [1] and is a form of visible light communication and a subset of optical wireless communications (OWC) and could be a complement to RF communication (Wi-Fi or Cellular network), or even a replacement in contexts of data broadcasting. It is so far measured to be about 100 times faster than some Wi-Fi implementations, reaching speeds of 224 gigabits per second.[2]

It is wireless and uses visible light communication or infra-red and near ultraviolet (instead of radio frequency waves) spectrum, part of optical wireless communications technology, which carries much more information, and has been proposed as a solution to the RF-bandwidth limitations.[3]

Technology details

This OWC technology uses light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a medium to deliver networked, mobile, high-speed communication in a similar manner to Wi-Fi.[4] The Li-Fi market is projected to have a compound annual growth rate of 82% from 2013 to 2018 and to be worth over $6 billion per year by 2018.[5]

Visible light communications (VLC) works by switching the current to the LEDs off and on at a very high rate,[6] too quick to be noticed by the human eye. Although Li-Fi LEDs would have to be kept on to transmit data, they could be dimmed to below human visibility while still emitting enough light to carry data.[7] The light waves cannot penetrate walls which makes a much shorter range, though more secure from hacking, relative to Wi-Fi.[8][9] Direct line of sight isn't necessary for Li-Fi to transmit a signal; light reflected off the walls can achieve 70 Mbit/s.[10][11]

Li-Fi has the advantage of being useful in electromagnetic sensitive areas such as in aircraft cabins, hospitals and nuclear power plants[citation needed] without causing electromagnetic interference.[8][9] Both Wi-Fi and Li-Fi transmit data over the electromagnetic spectrum, but whereas Wi-Fi utilizes radio waves, Li-Fi uses visible light. While the US Federal Communications Commission has warned of a potential spectrum crisis because Wi-Fi is close to full capacity, Li-Fi has almost no limitations on capacity.[12] The visible light spectrum is 10,000 times larger than the entire radio frequency spectrum.[13] Researchers have reached data rates of over 10 Gbit/s, which is much faster than typical fast broadband in 2013.[14][15] Li-Fi is expected to be ten times cheaper than Wi-Fi.[7] Short range, low reliability and high installation costs are the potential downsides.[5][6]

PureLiFi demonstrated the first commercially available Li-Fi system, the Li-1st, at the 2014 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.[16]

Bg-Fi is a Li-Fi system consisting of an application for a mobile device, and a simple consumer product, like an IoT (Internet of Things) device, with color sensor, microcontroller, and embedded software. Light from the mobile device display communicates to the color sensor on the consumer product, which converts the light into digital information. Light emitting diodes enable the consumer product to communicate synchronously with the mobile device.[17][18]

History

Harald Haas, who teaches at the University of Edinburgh in the UK, coined the term "Li-Fi" at his TED Global Talk where he introduced the idea of "Wireless data from every light".[19] He is Chair of Mobile Communications at the University of Edinburgh and co-founder of pureLiFi.[20]

The general term visible light communication (VLC), whose history dates back to the 1880s, includes any use of the visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum to transmit information. The D-Light project at Edinburgh's Institute for Digital Communications was funded from January 2010 to January 2012.[21] Haas promoted this technology in his 2011 TED Global talk and helped start a company to market it.[22] PureLiFi, formerly pureVLC, is an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) firm set up to commercialize Li-Fi products for integration with existing LED-lighting systems.[23][24]

In October 2011, companies and industry groups formed the Li-Fi Consortium, to promote high-speed optical wireless systems and to overcome the limited amount of radio-based wireless spectrum available by exploiting a completely different part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[25]

A number of companies offer uni-directional VLC products, which is not the same as Li-Fi - a term defined by the IEEE 802.15.7r1 standardization committee.[26]

VLC technology was exhibited in 2012 using Li-Fi.[27] By August 2013, data rates of over 1.6 Gbit/s were demonstrated over a single color LED.[28] In September 2013, a press release said that Li-Fi, or VLC systems in general, do not require line-of-sight conditions.[29] In October 2013, it was reported Chinese manufacturers were working on Li-Fi development kits.[30]

In April 2014, the Russian company Stins Coman announced the development of a Li-Fi wireless local network called BeamCaster. Their current module transfers data at 1.25 gigabytes per second but they foresee boosting speeds up to 5 GB/second in the near future.[31] In 2014 a new record was established by Sisoft (a Mexican company) that was able to transfer data at speeds of up to 10Gbit/s across a light spectrum emitted by LED lamps.[32]

Standards

Like Wi-Fi, Li-Fi is wireless and uses similar 802.11 protocols; but it uses visible light communication (instead of radio frequency waves), which has much wider bandwidth.

One part of VLC is modeled after communication protocols established by the IEEE 802 workgroup. However, the IEEE 802.15.7 standard is out-of-date, it fails to consider the latest technological developments in the field of optical wireless communications, specifically with the introduction of optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (O-OFDM) modulation methods which have been optimized for data rates, multiple-access and energy efficiency.[33] The introduction of O-OFDM means that a new drive for standardization of optical wireless communications is required.

Nonetheless, the IEEE 802.15.7 standard defines the physical layer (PHY) and media access control (MAC) layer. The standard is able to deliver enough data rates to transmit audio, video and multimedia services. It takes into account optical transmission mobility, its compatibility with artificial lighting present in infrastructures, and the interference which may be generated by ambient lighting. The MAC layer permits using the link with the other layers as with the TCP/IP protocol.[citation needed]

The standard defines three PHY layers with different rates:

  • The PHY I was established for outdoor application and works from 11.67 kbit/s to 267.6 kbit/s.

  • The PHY II layer permits reaching data rates from 1.25 Mbit/s to 96 Mbit/s.

  • The PHY III is used for many emissions sources with a particular modulation method called color shift keying (CSK). PHY III can deliver rates from 12 Mbit/s to 96 Mbit/s.[34]

The modulation formats recognized for PHY I and PHY II are on-off keying (OOK) and variable pulse position modulation (VPPM). The Manchester coding used for the PHY I and PHY II layers includes the clock inside the transmitted data by representing a logic 0 with an OOK symbol "01" and a logic 1 with an OOK symbol "10", all with a DC component. The DC component avoids light extinction in case of an extended run of logic 0's.[citation needed]

The first VLC smartphone prototype was presented at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas from January 7–10 in 2014. The phone uses SunPartner's Wysips CONNECT, a technique that converts light waves into usable energy, making the phone capable of receiving and decoding signals without drawing on its battery.[35][36] A clear thin layer of crystal glass can be added to small screens like watches and smartphones that make them solar powered. Smartphones could gain 15% more battery life during a typical day. This first smartphones using this technology should arrive in 2015. This screen can also receive VLC signals as well as the smartphone camera.[37] The cost of these screens per smartphone is between $2 and $3, much cheaper than most new technology.[38]

Philips lighting company has developed a VLC system for shoppers at stores. They have to download an app on their smartphone and then their smartphone works with the LEDs in the store. The LEDs can pinpoint where they are located in the store and give them corresponding coupons and information based on which aisle they are on and what they are looking at.[39]

Internet by light promises to leave Wi-Fi eating dust

By Laure Fillon


 

Barcelona (AFP) - Connecting your smartphone to the web with just a lamp -- that is the promise of Li-Fi, featuring Internet access 100 times faster than Wi-Fi with revolutionary wireless technology.

French start-up Oledcomm demonstrated the technology at the Mobile World Congress, the world's biggest mobile fair, in Barcelona. As soon as a smartphone was placed under an office lamp, it started playing a video.

The big advantage of Li-Fi, short for "light fidelity", is its lightning speed.

Laboratory tests have shown theoretical speeds of over 200 Gbps -- fast enough to "download the equivalent of 23 DVDs in one second", the founder and head of Oledcomm, Suat Topsu, told AFP.

"Li-Fi allows speeds that are 100 times faster than Wi-Fi" which uses radio waves to transmit data, he added.

The technology uses the frequencies generated by LED bulbs -- which flicker on and off imperceptibly thousands of times a second -- to beam information through the air, leading it to be dubbed the "digital equivalent of Morse Code".

View gallery

A delegate checks his smartphone at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, on February 22, 2016 (AF …

It started making its way out of laboratories in 2015 to be tested in everyday settings in France, a Li-Fi pioneer, such as a museums and shopping malls. It has also seen test runs in Belgium, Estonia and India.

Dutch medical equipment and lighting group Philips is reportedly interested in the technology and Apple may integrate it in its next smartphone, the iPhone7, due out at the end of the year, according to tech media.

With analysts predicting the number of objects that are connected to the Internet soaring to 50 million by 2020 and the spectrum for radio waves used by Wi-Fi in short supply, Li-Fi offers a viable alternative, according to its promoters.

"We are going to connect our coffee machine, our washing machine, our tooth brush. But you can't have more than ten objects connected in Bluetooth or Wi-Fi without interference," said Topsu.

Deepak Solanki, the founder and chief executive of Estonian firm Velmenni which tested Li-fi in an industrial space last year, told AFP he expected that "two years down the line the technology can be commercialised and people can see its use at different levels."

 

Li-Fi has been tested in France, Belgium, Estonia and India (AFP Photo/Sam Yeh)

- 'Still laboratory technology' -

Analysts said it was still hard to say if Li-Fi will become the new Wi-Fi.

"It is still a laboratory technology," said Frederic Sarrat, an analyst and consultancy firm PwC.

Much will depend on how Wi-Fi evolves in the coming years, said Gartner chief analyst Jim Tully.

"Wi-Fi has shown a capability to continuously increase its communication speed with each successive generation of the technology," he told AFP.

Li-Fi (Light-Fidelity) has reached speeds of over 200 Gbps (AFP Photo/Jung Yeon-Je)

Li-fi has its drawbacks -- it only works if a smartphone or other device is placed directly in the light and it cannot travel through walls.

This restricts its use to smaller spaces, but Tully said this could limit the risk of data theft.

"Unlike Wi-Fi, Li-Fi can potentially be directed and beamed at a particular user in order to enhance the privacy of transmissions," he said.

Backers of Li-Fi say it would also be ideal in places where Wi-Fi is restricted to some areas such as schools and hospitals.

"Li-fi has a place in hospitals because it does not create interference with medical materials," said Joel Denimal, head of French lighting manufacturer Coolight.

In supermarkets it could be used to give information about a product, or in museums about a painting, by using lamps placed nearby.

It could also be useful on aircraft, in underground garages and any place where lack of Internet


 


 

Read More about internet-by-light:

  • Tsonev, Dobroslav; Videv, Stefan; Haas, Harald (December 18, 2013). "Light fidelity (Li-Fi): towards all-optical networking". Proc. SPIE (Broadband Access Communication Technologies VIII) 9007 (2). doi:10.1117/12.2044649.

  • "pureVLC Ltd". Enterprise showcase. University of Edinburgh. Retrieved 22 October 2013.

  • Tsonev, D.; Sinanovic, S.; Haas, Harald (15 September 2013). "Complete Modeling of Nonlinear Distortion in OFDM-Based Optical Wireless Communication". IEEE Journal of Lightwave Technology 31 (18): 3064–3076. doi:10.1109/JLT.2013.2278675.

  1. Philips Creates Shopping Assistant with LEDs and Smart Phone, IEEE Spectrum, 18 February 2014, Martin LaMonica


 

 

READ THIS TECH DOC ON LIGHTCASTING: LiFi News.pdf

The information transfer from a laser satellite will be 90 to 100 times faster than the speed of a home Internet connection, and hours faster than from current satellites.

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By Lonnie Shekhtman, Staff  

The European Space Agency Saturday launched a telecommunications satellite into space from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, that will use lasers to gather information from Earth observation satellites and quickly send it to sensors on Earth. The launch was part of a project known as European Data Relay System, or EDRS, and is the first of several of these data-transfer satellites that will be launched into space in the next several years. The ESA says that its new laser communications network will create what it calls a “SpaceDataHighway,” able to transfer information such as photos and videos from Earth observation satellites, drones, and even from the International Space Station down to Earth at a near real-time speed of 1.8 Gigabits per second. This is 90 to 100 times faster than the speed of a home Internet connection, says the ESA. Recommended: How well do you know the moon? Take our quiz! “EDRS is one of a kind and ESA’s most ambitious telecom programme to date, creating the means for an entirely new market in commercial satellite communications,” the agency said in an announcement. The faster transmission speed will be a boost to responders to disasters, pollution incidents, or illegal fishing or ocean piracy, for example, who could make better decisions with more immediate access to satellite data. "Some important shipping routes go through the North Pole region, where thick-ice [floes] can cause damage to vessels and even threaten human life," Magali Vaissiere, ESA's director of telecommunications told the BBC. "It's also an environment in constant motion which means that data that is two days old is not only unhelpful – it could even be unsafe,” she said, referring to the limitations of traditional radio satellites. Current satellites in low Earth orbit are able only to send back the data they collect during their 100-minute orbit time around Earth during a 10-minute window when they have line-of-sight with sensors on Earth. ESA’s first optical satellite will remain in a stationary position higher in space (same as television satellites) than other satellites, about 36,000 kilometers (nearly 23,000 miles) from the Earth's equator and above Europe. It will collect data from this location and relay it down to European ground stations, avoiding the time delay when other Earth observation satellites have to wait for “line of sight” with ground stations, says the ESA. EDRS laser technology was developed by German satellite builder Tesat, a subsidiary of French aerospace company Airbus at a cost of 500 million euros. The laser terminal will be tested over the coming weeks and months with ground stations in Germany, Belgium, and the United Kingdom, and is expected to be fully operational this summer, when it should start serving its first customer, the European Commission. Over the next several years, ESA plans to discharge two more laser-equipped satellites into space, one over Europe and the other over the Asia-Pacific region. Their biggest challenge, said ESA project manager Michael Witting, will be to get these laser terminals to talk to each other. "It's a laser beam; you have to point it accurately. It's the same as taking a torch in Europe and pointing at a two-euro coin in New York,” Mr. Witting told ArsTechnica. “That's one of the main challenges for developing the laser communication terminal, but also developing the satellite – it has to be stable enough to allow that kind of accuracy," he said. The rise of Wi-Fi and cellular data services made Internet access more convenient and ubiquitous. Now some of the high-speed backhaul data that powers Internet services looks set to go wireless, too.

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  Technology that uses parallel radio and laser links to move data through the air at high speeds, in wireless hops of up to 10 kilometers at a time, is in trials with three of the largest U.S. Internet carriers. It is also being rolled out by one telecommunications provider in Mexico, and is helping build out the Internet infrastructure of Nigeria, a country that was connected to a new high-capacity submarine cable from Europe last year. AOptix, the company behind the technology, pitches it as a cheaper and more practical alternative to laying new fiber optic cables. Efforts to dig trenches to install fiber in urban areas face significant bureaucratic and physical challenges. Meanwhile, many rural areas and developing countries lack the infrastructure needed to support fiber, says Chandra Pusarla, senior vice president of products and technology at AOptix. He says a faster way to install new capacity is to use his company’s wireless transmission towers to move data at two gigabits per second. Pusarla says the service is particularly attractive to wireless carriers, whose customers have growing appetites for mobile data. Many U.S. providers are currently scrambling to install fiber to replace the copper cables that still link up around half of all cellular towers, he says, but progress has been slow and costly. In the suburbs of New York City, the cost of installing a single kilometer of new fiber can be $800,000, says Pusarla. AOptix technology takes the form of a box roughly the size of a coffee table with an infrared laser peering out of a small window on the front, and a directional millimeter wave radio beside it. The two technologies form a wireless link with an identical box up to 10 kilometers away. A series of such connections can be daisy-chained together to make a link of any length. AOptix teamed up the laser and radio links to compensate for weaknesses with either technology used

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TELECOM: Close-loop three-laser scheme for chaos-encrypted message transmission

A Light-Casting Li-Fi detail sheet for deployment of one variable in our patented mobile technology. For information on purchasing the mobile version of this technology, Contact us.

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Quantum Computing DRM for mobile movie delivery? Yep!

Close-loop three-laser scheme for chaos-encrypted message transmission

 

DOI: 10.1007/s11082-010-9435-6

Cite this article as:
Annovazzi-Lodi, V., Aromataris, G., Benedetti, M. et al. Opt Quant Electron (2010) 42: 143. doi:10.1007/s11082-010-9435-6

Abstract

In this paper, we numerically evaluate private data transmission using a three-laser scheme, consisting of a pair of twin semiconductor lasers, driven to chaos by delayed optical feedback in a short cavity, and optically injected by a third chaotic laser which forces them to synchronize. This laser is selected with different internal parameters with respect to the twin pair, so that the emissions of the synchronized, matched lasers, are highly correlated, whereas their correlation with the driver is low. The digital message modulates the emission of the transmitter, as in a standard Chaos Modulation scheme. Message recovery is then obtained by subtracting, from the transmitted chaos-masked message, the chaos, locally generated by the synchronized receiver laser. Simulations have been performed with the Lang-Kobayashi model, and, in view of application to private transmission, we have investigated the effect of the parameter mismatch, between transmitter and receiver, on message recovery. A preliminary experimental evaluation has been also performed using specially designed InP integrated modules.

Keywords

Optical chaosChaos synchronizationCommunication systemsPrivate transmission

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DESIGN: LUMIASCAPES LARGE AREA AND EDIFICE ELECTRO-OPTICAL DISPLAYS

Our Team can deliver an incredible illumination event for millions of viewers. We produced the very first one!

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Our Team created the first and largest outdoor electro-optical disaplays ever produced in a major urban environment!

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CLICK ON ANY THUMBNAIL, BELOW, TO EXPAND THE IMAGE:

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TELECOM: Peer-to-peer internet makes every phone, gamebox, and anything with an antenna become an entire cell phone company.

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Peer-to-peer internet makes every phone, gamebox, and anything with an antenna become an entire cell phone company.

The international public internet group (IPIG) http://p2p-internet.weebly.com wants developers to know that internet is free, unlimited and you can reach it anywhere on Earth. Finding a cell phone tower or cable box is not required in order to reach the web.

The cell phone and cable companies spend billions of dollars trying to keep you from finding out about this. They will not be able to profiteer off you if you find out a basic service is actually available to everyone, for free.

Peer-to-Peer Internet and “Neighbor-Networked Web” just made ISP's obsolete overnight

FREE UNLIMITED INTERNET FROM PUBLIC P2P MESH NETWORKS IS HERE, NOW!

Per The P2P Alliances at http://p2p-internet.weebly.com

NYC Mesh is trying to get around the big ISPs — one node at a time. Between them and the Red Hook Initiative, here's the state of mesh networks in Brooklyn.

Brian Hall gets on his laptop and types “ev.mesh/” in the address bar. A splash page opens. “This is the Mesh. This is not the internet.”

From this page, Hall chats with other people connected to “the Mesh.” Soon, he hopes to create a social network, where people will find local events and special deals advertised by local businesses. Maybe they’ll even be able to access Netflix, Hall said, admitting that this last wish is “just a wacky idea for the future.”

Brian Hall is a member of NYC Mesh, an organization that tries to build a decentralized network of devices, or “nodes,” which are connected between them. This network is called “the Mesh,” or meshnet, and is independent from the internet: If the internet is down, people who have access to a node can still be connected to each other. And unlike the internet, access to a mesh network is free, once you’ve bought the hardware to set up the network.

The goal of NYC Mesh is to connect all New Yorkers, provide free internet and “be an alternative to Time Warner,” Hall said.

Eight people faced their computers in a room on 3rd Avenue in Brooklyn, during one of NYC Mesh’s recent meetings. In Spain, a meshnet group, Guifi.net, managed to create a 20,000-node network, Hall said — actually the network has close to 30,000 nodes, according to Guifi’s website. One person at the table asked how many NYC Mesh nodes exist. “About 17, I think,” Hall answered with a smile, as he looked down on the table.

The Community-Owned ISPs Building an Alternative to Big Telecom in New York City

Written by Jason Koebler Staff Writer

If you want high speed internet in most any spot in New York City, you’re stuck with Time Warner Cable. Or at least, that’s how it usually works. But increasingly around the city, citizens and small community groups are setting up their own locally owned and operated free wifi networks.

This week on Radio Motherboard, we take a trip to a meetup where two nascent but potentially disruptive groups were discussing how to collaborate in order to provide new connection options to people around the city. Since 2012, the nonprofit Red Hook Wifi network has been providing totally free internet to people in the small Brooklyn neighborhood. For weeks after Hurricane Sandy struck the neighborhood, the Red Hook Wifi network was the only way many in the community could get on the internet or make phone calls. On any given day, Red Hook Wifi has about 500 users.

Meanwhile, NYC Mesh is little more than a meetup group at the moment, but its organizers have big plans. Its network currently has about 40 “nodes,” or routers that connect to each other to form a larger wireless network. Organizer Brian Hall is currently working to set up two “super nodes” that are jacked into a large internet exchange will allow anyone in lower Manhattan and large swaths of Brooklyn to bypass traditional internet service providers and connect directly to the NYC Mesh network.

Finally, a brand new fiber project is about to give the masses a new option, at least when they’re out on the streets of New York. Link NYC is a $200 million project to replace 7,500 payphones in the city with a free, gigabit fiber-connected wifi hotspot. We took a trip to Link NYC’s headquarters to check out the new “links” and learn about how the project hopes to protect privacy, become a profitable enterprise, and provide connections that people will actually want to use.

Topics: Radio Motherboard, podcasts, new york city, Red Hook Wifi, Broadband competition, Municipal Networks, NYC Mesh, mesh networks

The challenge is to scale up to a size where it becomes a reliable internet source,” Hall said.

Programmers and people with a tech background “all get the idea immediately,” Hall said. They like the idea of having a community-run network that doesn’t need the big internet providers. But it’s hard to sustain without getting more people onboard. “The average person is just looking for internet, really,” Hall said. “Non-technical people just want to watch Netflix so it’s hard to explain to them.”

Free internet might be a selling point for Hall. If one node has access to the internet, it can provide internet to the other nodes of the mesh network for free.

That echoes the project another Brooklyn-based organization is also currently developing.

Building a free internet network that bypasses the big providers was on the mind of workers at Red Hook Initiative (RHI) for a while, but “Hurricane Sandy kind of pushed the development,” said Robert Smith, the assistant administrator for RHI’s free WiFi project. During Hurricane Sandy, the internet was down, and RHI started to set up internet access points so people could get information and contact their families, Smith said.

FOR TECHNICAL DETAILS ON ONE SOLUTION SEE:

http://www.tranzeo.com/products/docs/EnRoute500-Mesh-sample-design-report.pdf

RHI pays its internet subscription to Brooklyn Fiber, and redistributes this coverage for free to a dozen parts of Red Hook. “We still have a lot of work to do,” Smith said. There are 13 routers operating now, and Smith said he thinks they need about 40 to 50 to cover the entire neighborhood.

Back in the 3rd Avenue room, Brian Hall said he’s planning to offer similar services via NYC Mesh. As his organization installs more nodes, he hopes to connect network with others in New York City, including the one RHI has set up. Before his meshnet reaches Red Hook, though, Hall will have to convince a lot of Netflix lovers to set up a node.

ALSO SEE:

http://stopthecap.com/tag/antennas/

http://motherboard.vice.com/en_uk/read/how-a-diy-network-plans-to-subvert-time-warner-cables-nyc-internet-monopoly

Gregoire Molle is a recent graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism who has covered Brooklyn for The Brooklyn Ink. The native of France is a former radio intern for Parisian radio station Vivre FM, where he reported and produced daily stories for its news show.

Profile   /   @GregoireMolle  

The internet may feel free, but it certainly isn't. The only way for most people to get it is through a giant corporation like Comcast or Time Warner Cable, companies that choke your access and charge exorbitant prices.

In New York City, a group of activists and volunteers called NYC Mesh are trying to take back the internet. They're building something called a mesh network — a makeshift system that provides internet access. Their goal is to make TWC totally irrelevant.

How it works: Mesh networks start with one internet connection, which broadcasts that connection to another router and then jumps from router to router until it builds a whole web of "nodes." Each node is its own access point where you can log onto the internet like any other Wi-Fi connection.

In New York, NYC Mesh has about 40 of these nodes installed, and for the cost of the router (about $30), volunteers will come by and climb trees or rooftops to wire up a new node for anyone who wants to host one.

Mesh networks aren't just a makeshift version of a mainstream internet provider — they're an opportunity to create something more free and resilient. Mesh networks like the one in Red Hook, Brooklyn, are built so that if Time Warner broadband goes down in the area, mesh users still have internet access. What mesh networks need are new nodes that can daisy-chain out to existing nodes to reach places where traditional Wi-Fi hasn't gotten to. And in some parts of the world, this is already happening.

A global revolution: Mesh networks caught fire during Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution, a student-led protest movement in 2014. During the protests, the open internet wasn't safe: Chinese government was deleting mentions of the sit-ins online, wiping posts from Chinese sites and blacking out CNN's news coverage of the movement. 

So the protesters used an app called Firechat, which turns every phone into a node by linking them all together over Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to communicate. Tens of thousands of protesters at a time were organizing anonymously, without the use of an established cellular network where they could face censorship.

Mesh networks aren't just used for subverting government censors and telecom giants. They can also bring the internet to those who don't have a national broadband infrastructure.

To bring the internet to Spanish farmland and blow past telecommunications giant Telefónica, a Spanish NGO created guifi.net, the world's largest mesh network with over 30,000 nodes. In Germany, the Freifunk initiative helps people create free local networks where there are few public Wi-Fi access points.

If a storm or flood wipes out existing cable infrastructure, or knocks out the broadband in an area, a mesh network of rooftop nodes and home routers could bounce the signal along through the air, unhindered.

Guifi

The people's provider: NYC Mesh has the potential to be the internet provider of the people, but there's one problem: If you trace back the internet connections through the nodes to their root, you'll eventually reach the source of the network, which is — guess what — a Time Warner Cable connection.

"Everyone seems to hate Time Warner; that's the thing that unifies the city," NYC Mesh organizer Brian Hall told Motherboard. "It's going to be a while before we replace Time Warner, but there's some hope of it happening."

 

FREE UN-CAPPED, UN-THROTTLED, ULTRA-HIGH-SPEED INTERNET WITHOUT CENSORING HAS ARRIVED AND THERE IS NO POSSIBLE WAY TO STOP IT

The founder of Aereo is promising to bring gigabit internet to every home

At a launch event in New York City today, Chaitanya "Chet" Kanojia, the founder of the now-deceased startup Aereo, launched an ambitious new wireless hub called Starry. Starry is supposed to offer gigabit internet to the home, but delivered over a wireless network rather than a traditional wired one. The technology was built by the same antenna experts who made Aereo, and may run into its own regulatory troubles as it attempts to leverage unlicensed bands of spectrum.

"It’s a little bit like witchcraft."

Like Aereo, Starry is a questionably ambitious idea. Kanojia wants to deliver extremely high-speed internet over the air using millimeter waves, which don't travel very far and aren't very good at penetrating obstacles — not even water in the air. That means Starry will have a lot of technical hurdles to overcome. The company is only presenting a sleek wireless hub at its event today, but it seems like more hardware — perhaps something outside the home — will be needed to fully connect to Starry's gigabit wireless network. It also means that Starry will need to set up broadcast points in very close proximity to its customers or use some sort of mesh technology to improve its reach. Doing that would likely make it harder for Starry to reach its goal of gigabit speeds. So, to be very clear, there's a lot to be skeptical about here.

Starry hasn't provided details on how it'll get around the many technical limitations in its way. "What are millimeter waves you ask? It’s a little bit like witchcraft," Kanojia says. The company keeps repeating a dense list of technologies — OFDM modulation, MU-MIMO, active phased array — which apparently add up to a solution. Kanojia acknowledges that no one has attempted internet delivery over millimeter waves before because it's difficult to get a connection from outside to inside of a house. But Starry has supposedly figured out a way to "steer" the signal using a bank of tiny antennas that increase the connection's power and accuracy. "People historically assumed fiber was the answer at all times," Kanojia says. Starry's approach, he claims, is "the most meaningful, scalable architecture anyone has proposed to this point."

Kanojia says that he wanted to launch Starry to give consumers an option about how they get internet. Most people are stuck with only one choice of internet provider — two if they're lucky — and it's difficult for new competitors to enter the space. Laying wires is expensive, as is launching a more traditional wireless network, so Kanojia is once again in charge of a company taking an unconventional approach in an attempt to quickly enter and disrupt an established market.

The company's hub, called Starry Station, doubles as a Wi-Fi router that can be controlled through a small touchscreen. The Station is supposed to include a built-in "internet health monitoring system," which will break down how much bandwidth different devices are using throughout the home and can suggest creating new networks to better suit specific devices.

"Did he say what the solution was?"

Starry still has a lot to prove. "A phased array is the worst possible choice for millimeter wave antenna. It’s terrible. I don’t understand it. The feed structure is very lossy, and it’s not cost-effective compared to a reflector or lens antenna," says Spencer Webb, an antenna consultant and President of AntennaSys. "[Kanojia] said it’s hard to go from the outside to the inside, but did he say what the solution was? Millimeter wave won’t go through a window."

Starry will launch its service first in Boston, with its hub selling for $349.99. It hasn't said yet how much it'll cost to get internet service delivered to that hub, but it has said that there will be no contracts or data caps. Sales will start on February 5th, with deliveries beginning in March. Starry plans to launch in additional cities throughout the year.

 

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Topics: Radio Motherboard, podcasts, new york city, Red Hook Wifi, Broadband competition, Municipal Networks, NYC Mesh, mesh networks , mesh networks, mesh internet, p2p internet

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